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Farhad
01-26-2007, 10:57 PM
In Alphabetical Order

Achakzai

is a Pashtun subtribe of Barakzai Clan. there are various other subtribes within the Achakzai clan like ( Adozai,Shamshozai,sultanzai,matakzai,ishaqzai,aliz ai,shakarzai,hamidzai and ghabizai ) mainly settled in Pakistan. The village or hometown of the Achakzai's is Qilla Abdullah in Balochistanand in the pashtun dominated areas of Afghanistan mainly in Kandahar Urzgan and Helmand provinces. Various political figures aroused in the history of Achakzai tribe like Mula Abdullah khan who fought against the British Raj of India in the 19th centrury when they extended to the border of Afghanistan. Esmat Muslim was achakzai of The Adozai subclan and was a renowned militry leader of the Soviat backed regime in Aghanistan. The people of the region opposed the occupation. Major cities of The achakzai dwelling are Chaman along the border of Afghanistan in Pakistan and Spin Boldak on the side of Afghanistan. Gulistan and Toba Achakzai also abdullah Khan and Quetta. The Achakzai's have demanded a separate province for the Pashtun ethic group, a province that should include Quetta, Qilla Abdullah, Mianwali and Pastun parts of Balochistan, NWFP, FATA and named as Pashtunistan. Some famous Achakzai's are Mahmood Khan Achakzai (MNA & Chairman of Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party), and his father was another respectable politician, Shaheed Abdul Samad Khan Achakzai. Historically Achakzais are brave intelligent and parioitic people. They have always fought for their land and have a good sense of discussion and critical thinking. Most of the achakzais are very good in negotiation and conflict resolution.In addition, achakzai's are famous for their ouitspokeness.




Afridi

Men from the Afridi tribe in battleAfridi (Urdu: آفریدی ) (Pashto: اپريدي ) is a Pashtun tribe. The Afridi tribe is the most powerful and dominant tribe of the Khyber Agency. The Afridis inhabat about 1000 miles of rough hilly area in the eastern Safed Koh range west of the Peshawarvalley. Maidan in Tirah which can be accessed by the Kajurhi plains and the valleys of Bara and Churah. The tribe numbers in about 315,000 people.

The famous historian Herodotus mentions a country bordering on the banks of the Indus occupied by a people called the Pactyae who were divided into four nations, one which was the Aparthea, or Aparutai, identified with the modern Afridis. They lay claim to an inaccessible upland area of refuge, the Tirah and it's central place, Maidan and at Bagh. As a result, they have literally have been able to force every passing conqueror to pay toll tax for use or passafe through the Khyber Pass. Some writers think that some tribes like the Afridis and Khattaks are indigenous, considering, for instance, that the afrids inhabited this terrain even during prehistoric times, which is before the recorded movement of other notable Pakhtun tribes to their present abodes. Olaf Caroe and Aurel Stein are reported to have suggested that the Afridis may be the original inhabitants of the Gandhare area rather than an integral part of the great clans allegedly descended from the tribes of Israel.

There are eight clans in the Afridi tribe. Adam Khel, Aka Khel, Kamar Khel, Kambar Khel, Kuki Khel, Malikdin Khel, Zakka Khel, and Sipah. All of the Afridi clans have their own areas in the Tirah, and most of them extend down into the Khyber over which they have always exercised the right of toll. The Malikdin Khel live in the center of the Tirah and hold Bagh, the traditional meeting place of Afridi jirgas or assemblies. The Aka Khel are scattered in the hills south of Jamrud. All of this area is included in the Khyber Agency. The Adam Khel live in the hills between Peshawar and Kohat. Their preserve is the Kohat Pass. In which several of the most important Afridi gun factories are located. The afridi Adam khel is further divided into seven clans as Jawakies, Bosti khel, Sherakies, Zarghoon Khel, Tor Chaaper, Akhorwal and Hassan Khel
Most Afridis have a meat eating cuisine eat kabob, lamb curry, chicken curry, goat curry, sheep, keema, Pata Teeka, and much more. Their vegetable cuisine consists of bendai(okra), choley, cuarka (red beans), dal, and more. Their desserts include keer (rice pudding), meenchai (sugared noodles). They drink a lot of chai.


Famous Afridis

Khatir Afridi , a prominent poet who wrote over 40,000 poems in his only four years of writing poetry. He died very young at the age of 32. He has only one son left who has collected all his poems and made a book out of them , a book which has achieved a good market value among the speakers of Pushto.
Shahid Afridi, famous in the world of cricket for his destructive batsmanship, once a pinch-hitter but now an all-rounder in the Pakistan ODI cricket team. Holds world record for fastest 100 (off only 37 balls).
Ayub Afridi, an associate of Abdul Qadir, described as a notorious drug baron.[1]
Ehsan Faraaz Afridi Khan, the notorious Ehsan Faraaz Afridi Khan is a cricketer from the province of Slough. His reputation precedes him wherever he goes. He was given the nickname "ACE" because of his formidable ability to get the wickets.

Dr Munawar Khan Afridi President & Chairman of WHO in the sixties




Ahmadzai
Ahmadzai is one of the largest tribes of Pashtuns.

Belonging to the Ghalzai or Ghaljai family of Pashtuns, the father of the tribe Ahmad Aba (father Ahmad) is buried in Paktika province in the southern part of Afghanistan.

Ahmadzai tribe originally sprung from the Junoobi province of the country, now divided in three provinces known as Paktya, Paktika and Khost. The tribe lives, apart from the three provinces, in Logar, Kabul, Maidan, Ghazni, Kapisa, Laghman, Nangarhar, Baghlan, Kunduz, Takhar and Balkh provinces.

A large part of the tribe lives in the south-eastern side of the Durnad line in Waziristan, Pakistan.

A number of Ahmadzai sub-tribes are Kuchi (nomads).

The former president of Afghanistan, Dr Mohammad Najibullah professor Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai are among the famous people of the tribe.


Alizai
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Alizai is a village in Pakistan located in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas near the Afghan border.

The United States has maintained detention facilities in Alizai, Pakistan. It is rumored that this site has been used to torture prisoners.[1][2]


Alizai

There are Three Places Named 'Alizai' In 'Kurram Agency' But the place we are talking about is Alizai Lower Kurram Agency. It is a Tehsil.It is occupied By Turi Tribe{Shia}.There are also Sunni Muslims in Alizai surroundings.It is the most Peaceful place in Kurram Agency.The people of Alizai are highly educated.It is near afghan border.This is the only place where every man can live a happy and peaceful life.




Barakzai

Barakzai or Barakzay is a Pashtun clan, belonging to Afghanistan and some also to Pakistan. The "Barakzai Dynasty" was the line of rulers in Afghanistan in the 19th and 20th centuries. Following the fall of the Durrani Empire in 1818, chaos reigned in the domains of Ahmed Shah Durrani's empire as various sons of Painda Khan struggled for supremacy. Afghanistan temporarely ceased to exist as a single nation, disintegrating for a brief time into a fragmented collection of small units. Dost Mohammad Khan gained preeminence in 1826 and founded the dynasty about 1837. Thereafter, his descendants ruled in direct succession until 1929, when King Amanullah Khan abdicated and his cousin Mohammed Nadir Shah was elected king. The most prominent subclan of the Barakzai Pashtun tribe is the Mohamedzai (Mohammadzai) clan, of which the several last kings had come from, including Mohammad Zahir Shah, the last king of Afghanistan.


List of Barakzai rulers

Emirate of Afghanistan

Emir Dost Mohammad Khan (1818-August 1839)
Emir Dost Mohammad Khan (1843-June 9, 1863)
Emir Shir Ali Khan (June 1863-February 21, 1879)
Emir Ya'qub Khan (February 1879-October 1879)
Emir Abdur Rahman Khan (October 1879/July 22, 1880-October 3, 1901)

Kingdom of Afghanistan

King Habibullah Khan (October 3, 1901 - February 20, 1919)
King Amanullah Khan (February 28, 1919 - January 14, 1929)
King Inayatullah Khan (January 14, 1929 - January 17, 1929)
King Mohammed Nadir Shah (October 17, 1929 - November 8, 1933)
King Mohammed Zahir Shah (November 8, 1933 - July 17, 1973)



Baburkhel

Baburkhel is a Pashtun tribe notably settled in the Nowshera District, Sarhad, Pakistan.

Babarkhel have settled in areas as far as at Zhob and there are small communities of Babarkhel, at Quetta, Multan and Dera Ismail Khan as well as in Muzaffargarh District.




Bangash

Bangash is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan. They are found mainly in the district and city of Kohat (also known as Kohistan) and in various surrounding towns such as Tirah, Obbatal, Darsamand, Hangu which is located in Kohat distric, Toghbala and Toraori in the Sarhad of Pakistan. Some Bangash are also settled in Khorasan and Mazandaran in Iran. Bangash are also found in India, especially in Farrukhabad. The Nawab of Farrukhabad was from the Bangash Tribe whose dynasty ruled until 1801 when power was transferred to the British. The Bangash speak the Pushtu dialect of Pashto.







Baranzai

Baranzai is a Pashtun tribe in the North West Frontier Province and Balochistan provinces of Pakistan.



Battanni

Battanni is the name of a small tribe who originally resided in the regions of Dera Ismail Khan district of North West Frontier Province of Pakistan.




Bazai

Bazai is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan.



Chamkanni

Chamkanni is the name of a small Pashtun tribe of Afghanistan. The Chamkannis residing in the western part of the Kurmana valley are considered to be a distinct race. During the Tirah Campaign (1897-98) of the British Raj, the bands of rebellious Chamkannis were also attacked.


Darpa Khel

Darpa Khel is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan.



Daulat Khel

Daulat Khel, along with the Maghdud Khel, Mahmud Khel, Mahsud Khel, Khulozai, Umar Khel and Yusaf Khel, is a sub-division of the Kakazai, Tarkanis/Mamund tribe of the Pashtuns located in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Dilazak

TheDilazak 17:02, 3 January 2007 (UTC)==DILAZAK-AN AFGHAN TRIBE ==

It is an Afghan Tribe which descended into the valley of Peshawar (Pakistan) in Smanyid's dynasty from 'Suleman Range’ between 750 AD and 850 AD. They were the First of all Afghans and were Muslims by that time. They expelled or subdued local people of Swati, Degan and Tirahi castes. By the time of Mehmood Ghaznavi, they had reached up to Sind River (Also called Abaseen & Neelaab. They participated in Mehmood Ghaznavi's campaigns in large numbers under their leader Malik Yahya. Later they extended up to present day Hassan Abdal (Near Taxila) and towards north up to Abbott Abad. Around 1520 AD, another Afghan Tribe Yousafzi was expelled from Kabul (Afghanistan) by the uncle of Mughal Emperor Zaheeruddin Muhammad Babur, Mirza ulugh Beg. The Yousafzi's migrated to Peshawar valley and sought help from The Dilazak which was granted to them by The Dilazak. Later on relation between the two Tribes deteriorated and a long war ensued. Ultimately Yousafzi along with few other tribes (Including Utmanzi-Cousins of The Dilazak) were able to push away The Dilazak east of Sind River under their leader Malik Ahmed Khan after 20 Years. Tragedy of The Dilazak did not end here. The Mughals had fluctuating relations with the Afghans. To their hard luck, The Dilazak were on the eastern side of Sind River and thus totally accessible to a properly trained huge Mughal Army. Around 1607 AD, Mughal Emperor Jahangir (Muhammad Saleem) once visiting Kabul in Afghanistan, left His large Army under the command of Zaffar Khan Koka son of Zain Khan Koka and ordered him to wipe out The Dilazak and arrest the leaders of Khhattar Tribe (Non-Afghan).Zain Khan Koka did it well and deported 0.1 million (1,00,000) families of The Dilazak to Lahore for onward dispersal in whole of India. Only few families of The Dilazak survived from this tragic event. These families still survive. Today they are found in Districts Abbott Abad, Haripur, Charsadda, Swat, Peshawar (All in North West Frontier Province) and Attock (In Punjab Province). They are in districts Shahjehan Pur & also in village Shahjahanpur District(Meerut)on Meerut Garh Road(Uttar Perdesh), Jullandhar (Indian Punjab), Bari Town (Rajasthan) and Dilazi & other villages in Andhera Perdesh-old Deccan), Western Bengal and few other regions of India. References to this article are more than 100 English books and same no of Urdu/Pashto and Persian books. However, read 'The Pathans" by Sir Olaf Caroe, 'Baburnama' by Anitta S.Beverage, 'Taareekh-e-Khanjehani Wa Makhzan-e- Afghani' by Nematullah Hurvi etc. If you want to know anything more about this Karrani (Karlani) Tribe, Send an E mail to me at dilazak1@yahoo.com




Daulatzai

The Daulatzai are one of the Pashtun tribes of northern Afghanistan. They reside mainly in the province of Balkh, and also in parts of surrounding provinces.


Davi

Davi (also spelled as Dawee, Daavi or Daway) is a Pashtun tribe and the brother of the Kakar tribe. Both are the sons of Ghorghosht tribe. Ghorghosht was the third and youngest son of Qais Abdur-Rashid, the father of Pashtuns. Davis are traditionally known for their bravery, hardness and simplicity. They are said to be hospitable. They are living in Balochistan, especially in Quetta, Pishin, Zhob, Chaman and everywhere where Kakar lives. In Sarhad they are living in Katlang village and in sawaldhere village.


Durrani

Durrani (Persian: درانی) or Abdali (Persian: ابدالی) tribe is one of the two largest Pashtun tribes of Afghanistan and is also found in large numbers in western Pakistan. They are estimated to be roughly 20% of the population of Afghanistan and number around 7 million there with another 1-2 million found in Pakistan and hundreds of thousands also live in northeast Iran. The Durrani are the most "Persianized" of Pashtun tribes, often bilingual in Dari (or Afghan Persian), as well as arguably being among the most urbanized and educated of the Pashtuns in Afghanistan.

The Durrani have been prominent leaders, as the royal family of Afghanistan is derived from the tribe, and a substantial number of Durrani are bureaucrats and public officials, as well as businessmen and merchants. The particular dialect of Pashto favored by the Durrani tends to be tinged with a slight Persian inflection and is considered the more genteel and urbane dialect, often viewed by Pashtuns overall as the more 'proper' dialect, as opposed to the rougher "Pukhtu" version favored in the north and by most of the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The Durrani, like most other Pashtuns, are Muslim and are mostly of the Hanafi Sunni Islamic sect and, like most Pashtuns, continue to follow the Pashtun honor code known as Pashtunwali.


A brief history

The Durrani are, like other Pashtuns, primarily descendants of Aryan invaders of the Iranian variant (as well as the various invaders, such as the Greeks, and migrants who have passed through Afghanistan over the centuries) and probably arose in what is today southern Afghanistan near the Suleiman Mountains at some point between 2000 BCE to 1500 BCE. The Durrani were known as the Abdali since Islamic times and frequently lived under Persian rule in ancient times. They emerged near the city of Kandahar and were most likely Pagan, Buddhist and Zoroastrian in religion prior to the coming of Muslim Arabs who began the conversion of the local population to Islam. The Abdalis appear to have begun to spread out during the early Middle Ages along with other Pashtun tribes and came to inhabit most of what is today Afghanistan by 1000 CE at the latest. Often affiliated with the Persians of Iran, some rose to upper ranks of the Persian military during the reign of the Safavids and gained particular prominence under the rule of Nadir Shah. One of his prominent generals was a young Pashtun Abdali chieftain named Ahmad Shah Abdali who would later make himself the king of Afghanistan.

The name 'Durrani' or 'Durr-i-Durran' means the 'pearl of pearls' in Persian and was given to the Abdali tribe in 1747 when Ahmad Shah Abdali united the Pashtun tribes following a loya jirga and changed his own name to Ahmad Shah Durrani when he became the king of Afghanistan and founded the Durrani Empire. Since this period, the kings of Afghanistan have been of Durrani extraction. The Durrani were the most divided Pashtun tribe during the rule of the Ghilzai-dominated Taliban, with some having openly opposed them. The Durrani are the politically dominant Pashtun group in Afghanistan as the current President of Afghanistan is Hamid Karzai who is of the Durrani sub-group known as the Popalzay and has close ties to the former king of Afghanistan Zahir Shah, another member of the Durrani tribe.


Current social conditions

Like most Pashtun groups, the Durrani can be sub-divided into smaller clans and subtribes (such as the aforementioned Popalzai) which will still acknowledge each other as kinsmen. The literacy rate of the Durrani is the highest of all of the Pashtun tribes in Afghanistan and hovers around 25%. Perhaps the most liberal of the Pashtun groups, the Durrani are currently at the forefront of rebuilding war-torn Afghanistan and are quickly filling the ranks of the military and are valued as city officials and policemen in cities such as Kandahar and Kabul. The Durrani in Pakistan are largely refugees, but many have become prominent merchants in Quetta and Peshawar. The Durrani continue to live in close proximity to other Afghans and culturally overlap in many ways with the Tajiks with whom they often share more cultural and socio-economic traits in comparison to the more tribal Pashtuns such as the Ghilzai, who are the other major Pashtun group in Afghanistan. The Durrani are part of Sarbans, a Pashtun tribal group.



Edo-Khel

Edo-Khel is a Pashtun tribe whom inhabit the mountainous and vallied regions of south-eastern Afghanistan; mainly Wardak and Logar.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:03 PM
Gandapurs

The Gandapurs are a Pashtun tribe inhabiting the environs of Dera Ismail Khan, a major commercial center the west bank of the Indus River, in the southern region of the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan, near the frontier with South Waziristan. The Gandapurs reside principally in the small town of Kulachi on the bank of River Gomal, a tributary of River Indus and trace their origin to Afghanistan.

They settled in Dera Ismail Khan area in 17th Century A.D. A part of the tribe lives in Sur Kalay in Ghazni Province of Afghanistan.


History
The Gandâpûr, like many other nomadic Pashtun groups in the region, regularly moved between Afghanistan and the Dâmân plains stretching from the Indus to the eastern slopes of the Solaymân mountains. They combined pastoral nomadism with transporting and peddling of goods between Central Asia and South Asia. The pattern of these nomadic movements and the transformations of their society fluctuated with the rhythms of trade and the nature of their contacts with the surrounding political economies throughout their history. During the 17th century, most of the Gandâpûr had settled in Dêra Ismâîl Khân, with large numbers engaged in the trade between India and Khorasan, which intensified in the next two centuries (Elphinstone, p. 373).


Tradition of tribe's origin

The origin of the Gandapurs is based only on traditions not yet properly researched. In some sources, Gandapurs are described as syeds. There is a tradition that they are the descendants of Syed Muhammad Gaisu Daraaz who was a Sufi Poet of 16th Century AD. This tradition, as supported by Tarikh-e-Pushtun and Tarikh-e-Gandapur, traces the origin of Gandapurs as follows;

Syed Muhammad Gaisu Daraaz =>> Storay (meaning Star in Pashto) =>> Tairi Khan or Gandapur.
The tradition tells us that Tairi married a girl Gul Andama (Persian words meaning 'having limbs like flowers'). Gul andama belonged to a hostile tribe and so Tairi had to migrate to avoid revenge from his wife's tribe. His Father Storay bid him farewell and prayed for him as "Ganda pura" (Pashto words meaning Ganda = Bag and Pura = Full) and it meant "Tairi should always have full bounties and blessings of all kinds" and hence it became the epithet of Tairi and was later known as Gandapur.

Modern linguist Asif Amir Khan Gandapur doubts the credibility of the above tradition regarding the origin of Gandapurs. He says," No historical tradition supports that Syed Muhammad Gaisu Daraaz came all the way from Deccan to Sulaiman Range and married any Shirani tribe girl here. Gaisu Daraaz lived in 16th Century and there are evidences that there was a sizeable population of Gandapurs in the 16th century and hence it is not possible that they could be the descendant of Gaisu Daraaz. Moreover in the Mughal era it was quite common to associate one self with syeds (descendants of the Holy Prophet Muhammad) in order to get more respect in Muslim Society."

He further adds, "Linguistic and Anthropolical research and Geographical and traditional evidences show that they are part of the large Ghilzai Tribe. In Afghanistan, they are considered close or rather cousins of Tarakai tribe. Traditionally they have followed the same nomadic route as other Ghilzai tribes from Ghazni or Ghilzai tribe's area to Damaan, Dera Ismail Khan ."

The Khaddal Luvañ Episode

Luvañ is a small Pashtun tribe residing in and around Qamardin Karez in the west of Zhob district in the north-west Balochistan. Gandapurs used to pass through their area while going from their place in Ghazni to Dera Ismail Khan in a usual annual cycle of Nomadic life.

Khaddal Luvanh was chief of the Luvanh tribe in 16th century A.D. He chose a narrow pass in the way of nomadic tribes going to Dera Ismail Khan and the rest of Indus plain passing through his area and laid their. He demanded that girls from various tribes should come and lift him in their shawls. That was very humiliating demand and none of the tribe could accede to that. When the Gandapurs arrived to at the narrow pass, they found Khaddal luvanh lying in the pass. When lengthy negotiations bore no fruit, some of the Gandapur young men disguised themselves as girls wearing shawls of women and came to Khaddal. Apparently they had come to lift him in their shawls but they divided him into pieces.
The death of Khaddal Luvanh brought them in confrontation with the Luvanh tribe and their route from Ghazni to Dera Ismail Khan no longer remained safe. This led to the separation of the tribe into two parts. One part of the tribe settled in Damaan, Kulachi, Dera Ismail Khan and the other part remained in their original abode in Ghazni, Afghanistan. A distance of more than 450 kilometers between two places and the enemy tribe inhabiting the route divided the tribe. Over a period of almost four centuries, both the parts of Gandapur tribe have lost any contact between them.

Gandapur or Afghanpur

When the great Afghan King and worrior Ahmad Shah Abdali gathered all the Pashtun tribes and conquered a large part of the area presently comprising Afghanistan and Pakistan, Gandapurs were part of his army. As the tradition goes, soldiers speaking Persian used to pronounce "d" in the word Gandapur as soft d (such as th in the English word The). With the soft d, the word "Ganda" would become a Hindustani language word "Ganda" (meaning not clean or untidy). When Ahmad Shah Abdali came to know that fact, he bestowed upon Gandapurs the title of "Afghanpur". Gandapurs were held in high esteem by Ahmad Shah Abdali.


Size of the tribe
Gandapurs living in Pakistan do not form a very large tribe. They have occupied northern part of Tehsil Kulachi. The area occupied by Gandapurs is roughly one-third of the area as occupied by Marwat Tribe. Population of Gandapurs may range from 40,000 to 60000. But their influence is more as compared to their size of population.

The Gandapurs living in Afghanistan may also range between 30000 to 40000 according to conservative estimates. They live in Ghazni district in Afghanistan where they associate themselves with Tarakai tribe.

There is no interaction between Gandapurs living in Afghanistan and Pakistan.


Sub Tribes
The tribe is further divided into following sub-tribes;

Ibrahim Zai
Yaqub Zai
Hussain Zai
Bara Khel
Shehzad Khel
Khadar Khel
Bahadur Khel
Usman Khel
Allah Dad Khel
Zahak Zai
Nakundar Zai
Nattu Zai
Imran Zai
Kamal Khel
Musa Zai
Some of the sub tribes though living with Gandapurs are not considered as part of the original tree. They are as follows;

Shakhi
Rana Zai
In Afghanistan, Gandapurs are considered as Cousins or a part of the large Tarakai tribe.


Present State of Gandapurs
Gandapur are a small tribe as compared to other Pashtun tribes. Their main concentration is in northern part of Tehsil Kulachi where every sub tribe was allotted large chunk of lands. A large number of Gandapurs reside in Dera Ismail Khan, Zhob, and also in Loralai. Some educated and wealthy families also reside in Peshawar, Islamabad and Quetta. As their lands are mostly barren, they are not very rich people. Most of them live below poverty line. Education has been the only escape from the clutches of poverty. They are regarded as one of the most talented Pashtun tribe.


Distinguished sons
Since Gandapurs live in Kulachi on lands most barren due to paucity of water, education has been the only means to move forward on the path of development and prosperity. Gandapurs have made a mark in various walks of life and ratio of of educated and talented people is more than any other tribe of Southern NWFP as compared to their total population. Some of the important personalities are as follows;


Politics
Noor Muhammad Tarakai: He was the President of Afghanistan after the Communist Revolution. He founded the Afghan Peoples Party. He was also a great literary figure.
Naurang Khan: He was the chief of Ibrahim Zais in second half of the 19th Century A.D. According to the Gazzetteer of Dera Ismail Khan District 1882-83, Naurang Khan "did a yeoman service" and saved the British forces in Multan in the Indian War of Independence 1875 A.D. He was rewarded jagir in the Marwat area near Bannu and the village has been named after him as Sarai Naurang. He was cursed by Muslim pious people for his anti-Muslim services and loyalty to British Empire. The curse still continues and there is atleast one insane person in his family in every generation.
Aurang Zeb Khan: He was the chief Minister of the North-West Frontier Province before 1947 Muslim Goovernment. He was the one who endorsed the Pakistan Resolution on 23rd March 1940 representing the North-West Frontier Province Muslim League.
Inayat Ullah Khan: Born in Kulachi on 27th August, 1919, famous for his Texan attire, served as Chief Minister of the North-West Frontier Province from 1973 to 1975,and held various portfolios of Revenue,Excise & taxation,Transport,Law & Parliamentary affairs,Communication and works, Irrigation, Finance, Agriculture from his tenure in 1970s to 2005. He would always stand as an independent candidate in his political career. He enjoyed shooting and hunting especially wild boar hunting. He was famous for his political integrity and never had any other assets apart from his inherited landed property,family home and a 1970 Land Cruiser 4 Wheeler, with a special number plate carrying the first numbers of Peshawar (PR-1) by which he performed Hajj by road from his home town Kulachi to Mecca and reutrn journy too. He was the oldest member of the North West Frontier Province and died, while still being a member of parliament at the age of 86, on 28th April 2005, leaving behind 6 daughters and 3 sons.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:04 PM
Ghilzai


The Ghilzais (also known as Khiljis or Ghaljis) are one of two largest groups of Pashtuns, along with the Durrani tribe, found in Afghanistan with a large group also found in neighboring Pakistan. They are the most populous Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan, occupying the north of Kandahar and extending eastwards towards the Suleiman Mountains.

The Ghilzais are concentrated in an area spanning Ghazni and Kalat-i-Ghilzai eastward into western Pakistan, but are predominantly a nomadic group unlike the Durrani who can be found in permanent settlements. Population estimates vary, but they are most likely around 20 to 25% of the population of Afghanistan and probably number over 9 million in Afghanistan alone with 2 million or more found in neighboring Pakistan. They are reputed to be descended at least in part from the Khalaj or Khilji Turks, who entered Afghanistan in the 10th century as well as the numerous other invaders from Central Asia and the Middle East who have entered Afghanistan over the centuries. Most Ghilzai are Sunni Muslims of the Hanafi school and are often devout to their faith and also follow the Pashtun code of honor known as Pashtunwali. Most Ghilzai work as herders as well as in construction and other jobs that allow them to travel. Often displaying an uncanny mechanical apptitude, the Ghilzai nonetheless have an extremely low literacy rate hovering below 10%.

The Ghilzai have played a prominent role throughout the history of the Middle East, Central Asia, and South Asia. The Nasher (Ghaznavids) are Ghilzais, as well as the Lodi dynasty, who were rulers of the Delhi Sultanate (1450–1526), were Ghilzai Pashtuns. In 1709, Mirwais Khan Hotak, a Ghilzai Pashtun and founder of the short-lived Hotaki Dynasty (1709-38), led an Afghan tribal revolt against Persian rule that eventually led to the short-lived Afghan domination of Persia from 1722 until 1734 when Nadir Shah began to wrest control from the Ghilzais.

In the early 20th century, Sher Khan Nasher gained much political prominence as a Ghilzai Khan who became founder and governour of Kunduz. He was followed by his son, Gholam Serwar Nasher, who headed the Spinzar Company as well as by his nephew, the parliamentarian Gholam Nabi Nasher. During the period of Soviet invasion of Afghanistan many of the Muhajadeen were also Ghilzai Pashtuns including Gulbuddin Hekmatyar. Most Ghilzai are not particularly political. The Ghilzai remain one of the largest and most prominent ethnic groups in Afghanistan and continue to enjoy considerable autonomy as they have for millennia.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:05 PM
Ghoriah Khel

Ghoriah Khel is a Pashtun tribe settled in the town of Peshawar valley in North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan. The legendary Pashto poet Rahman Baba also belonged to this tribe.



Ghourghushti

Ghorghushti refers to the Pashtun sub-tribes that are descended from Ghorghusht, one of Qais Abdur Rashid's sons. According to Pashtun oral history, Ghourghusht had only one son who was named Dani.

Below are some of the sub-tribes present today that claim descent from Ghorghusht:

Kakar
Mando
Gadun
Safi
Many of the people belonging to these sub-tribes reside in the Attock District of Pakistan, and speak Hindko as opposed to Pashto as their mother tongue.

Unofficially the region encompassing Attock is called Chach and the Pashtuns living there are usually called Chach Pashtuns. Chach Pashtuns are revered for their vicious fighting ability in ancient times and more recently for their many advancements in education, culture, and society.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:07 PM
Hassanzai

Hassanzai is a leading tribe in the Black Mountain of Hazara region of modern Pakistan. Their fighting strength against British Government at the end of the 19th century was over 2500 armed men.





Hoti

Oothay (Pashto) is inhabited by the Kamalzai Pashtuns, a sub-tribe of the Yousafzai. Hoti is located in the North West Frontier Province (NWFP) of Pakistan. It is part of Mardan District, just west of Peshawar, the capital of the NWFP.

The people of this area speak Pashto as well as Hindko and adhere strongly to the Pashtun traditions of hospitality and loyalty.

Although the MPs are democratically elected in the NWFP, the old feudal system is still strong in Hoti. The head of the leading feudal family is Mohammad Ali Khan Hoti, ex-education minister of Pakistan. They are a well educated family and Mohammad Ali's grandson, Jaffar Khan, was the first Muslim President of the Cambridge Union.

The main source of livelihood for the Hoti tribe is agriculture and they process and export sugarcane to the rest of the country



Hussain Zai

Hussain Zais are the descendants of Hussain, the third son of Gandapur.

Hussain Zais are a small segment of the whole tribe of Gandapurs. Most of them live close to Mosa Zais in Kulachi, Dera Ismail Khan.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:10 PM
Ishakzai

The Ishakzai are a Afghani subtribe of the Durrani tribe who, in turn, are a subtribe of the Pashtun tribe. They are predominant in Southern Afghanistan, particularly the provinces of Kandahar and Helmand.


Jadoon
Jadoon is a Pashtun tribe. They live in the Abbottabad District, Haripur Districts and Swabi District of Sarhad, Pakistan. Their spoken language is Pashto in Swabi and mostly Hindko in Abbottabad. The Jadoons were freedom fighters and they showed bravery against their rivals, especially the Sikhs and the British with other prominent Pashtun tribes of the region like Swati, Tareens and Shilmani. Their leader Sakhi Jan Jadoon has been martyred during the freedom efforts against the Sikhs in the 18th century. They are divided into two clans, namely Salar and Mansoor. Hassa Zai is also one of the major sub tribes of Jadoon. They are mostly living in Gadoon Amazai, Abbottabad (Sheikh-ul-Bandi, NawanShehr, Dhamtor and Mir Pur, Havalian), Haripur(Bagra, Karakki, Gandian, Langrial) and Kala Dhaka area.


Jahangiri

Jahangiris are one of the leading Pashtun (Pathan) clans of the Swati tribes of the Sarhad of Pakistan, mainly residing in the Hazara division of the districts of Batagram and Mansehra. The Jahangiris were well known as the Jahangiri chain of Sultans in the history of Pakistan and Afghanistan. According to Major Raverty, their kingdrom stretched from Jalalabad to Jehlum. At times, the Jahangiris even ruled over Kashmir. The last of the Jahangiri Sultans of Swat were Owais Jahnagiri and Mir Haider Ali Gebri of Bajaur, who were defeated by Babur and their allies in the late 15th century.

Some famous subsections of the Jahangiris are Amier Khani, Sab Dini, Adlai, Akhun khel, Aspi khel, Ali khel, Hassani, Manshahi, Khabardin khel, Hassab din khel, Esap ali khel, Barkhan khel and Khazan khel or Khazani. Pashto, Hindko and in some places Dari is spoken in the tribe.

The tribe is living mostly in Mansehra distict (Kotkey, Jobari, Laborkot etc). They are also resident in the Agror Valley in the basin of Tur Ghar (Kala Dhaka)or the black mountain, the Pakhli Plain and parts of Upper Tanawal.



Jogezai

Jogezai is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan and Afghanistan as well as India. The majority of the Jogezais live in the valley of Zhob. Due to certain tribal fudes, they had to migrate to other parts of Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Jogezai is a sub and ruling tribe of the Kakar tribe (one of the largest tribes) among the Pashtuns of both Pakistan and Afghanistan. Kakars reside in Afghanistan and in Pakistan apart of those who migrated to India and a large section of those in India are Hindus. Their chief (Sardar) or head of the tribe was Baikar Khan, who along with other tribes went with Ahmed Shah Abdali and conquered India. He was given the title of King of Zhob by the Afghan Monorchs. At that time Zhob was part of Afghanistan until the British took it over. The Jogezais hold a very prominent position among the Pashtun tribe of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:11 PM
Kahol

Kahols is the smallest layer in Pashtun tribal organization.

More precisely, there are several levels of organization: the Tabar (tribe) is subdivided into kinship groups each of which is a Khel. The Khel in turn is divided into smaller groups (Pllarina or plarganey), each of which consists of several extended families or Kahols. [Wardak, 2003, p. 7] "A large tribe often has dozens of sub-tribes whose members may see themselves as belonging to each, some, or all of the sub-tribes in different social situations (co-operative, competitive, confrontational) and identify with each accordingly."

Farhad
01-26-2007, 11:12 PM
To be Cont:yes:

fakolta
01-27-2007, 12:28 AM
these all trib are in sol and heart , ( for afghan) are ( paraday ) , they love to be with Pakistani . , but in Afghanistan these are not even like to call them self afghan .( they call them self pashtoon ) , also these are, love to even speak ( afghan pashto) with Pakistani Urdu accent , like jelal abti , and laghamani , and kamaie . love to be talk and sing and dress like peshowri , and Qandahari love to be like kowata wallah . and from other said we have a city to name of heart . who even control total economic of city of mashhad during war and even now , they never ever call them self Irani , or not even love to talk or use Irani word or accent in there conversation , a 25% test of long time ago now also they have in there language . but when you ask them ,are you from Iran . quickly they answer you , alhamdulellah I am from Afghanistan . but all our pashtoon like always have Pakistani ( shinakhte card ) and passport , and they never even thinks of Afghanistan , . from all this Pashtun tribal show me one who don a great job for Afghanistan .

Mademoiselle
01-27-2007, 06:24 AM
what happen to mamadzai..?

Zezima
01-27-2007, 07:32 AM
I can't believe you endorsed Taraki.......ZOMG!

fakolta
01-27-2007, 08:46 AM
what happen to mamadzai..?


mamadzai ;
start at 1879 by emir Abdurrahman khan ( I am sure you saw he is grave in park e zarnegar ) of Kabul who all Qandahari bro smoking chars all evening and morning in down of he is grave . and end with government of daoud khan in 1978 ,. i have a piece of history here for all of you ,. if you have time please do not missed .


http://www.afghana.com/SocietyAndCulture/amanula.htm

Omar
01-27-2007, 10:59 AM
- The Mohmand tribe went against the Muhammadzai puppet kings and used to fight the Brits along side the Waziris and Mangals

The Mohmand

Mohmands are a big tribe among the Sarrban social group of the Afghan tribes and they are Ghoriakhel (=clan of Ghoria) Pashtuns. It is said that Ghoria had four sons, who were named Daulatyar, Khalil, Zaukanay and Ziarranay. Daulatyar had two sons, the former was called Mohmand and the latter Daud. Those children of Mohmand, who live in plane areas are called "kuz Mohmand" (lower Mohmands), those who live in mountainous regions are called "bar Mohmand" (upper Mohmands) but in reality they are the same. Like other Pashtun tribes, the Mohmands are divided into different subtribes (clans).

The famous clans among the Mohmands are the following:

1 Khwaizi 2 Halimzi 3 Utmanzi 4 Baizi 5 Kudakhel 6 Kachi
7 Atmarkhel 8 Tarakzi 9 Khwajazi 10 Nazarkhel 11 Issakhel 12 Burhankhel
13 Barakhel 14 Mosakehl 15 Khogakhel 16 Mirukhel 17 Babazi

The dwelling places of some important clans of the Mohmand:

1. Khwaizi: is an important clan of the Mohmands, to their east lies Gandau, to their west Kudakhel and Babazi and to their north flows the river of Kunar. Their lands are watered by them. These are the names of their important villages:

Mohammad Kor, Kanag, Sam Ghashi, Ochajawera, Molla Nahim Kelai, Zenaorchina, Sorabian and Schin Orsang. It is said that their number reaches nearly 20000.

2. Halimzi: They live in the northeast of the Baizis, in Kamali Dara and Gandau and constitute a big number of Mohmands.

3. Utmanzi: To their east lies Anshkol, to the west Kandahari, to the north the mountains of Duiz, and to their south Kamali Dara. The land of the Utmanzi is plane, dusty and watered by rain. Their people live mainly from agriculture. Their number reaches 10000 and their big village is Yakhdand.

4. Baizi: This clan of the Mohmand is famous and in it said they live to the sunset side of the mountains.

5 Kudakhel: To the east of this branch are the Khwaizi, to the sunset (west) is the Atmarkhels Ashkar kelai (village) and to the south is Bara Dara (upper valley).

6. Kachi: This is a branch of the Mohmand that spend their lives in trading between Kabul and Peshawar

7. Atmarkhel: They live in the south of Jarubi Dara, their western portion is intermingled with the Durkhel. To the east are Babazi and Kudakhel and to the north also Babazi. Their number is about 20000 individuals and their famous villages are named: Turakhel, Khanjar Kelai, Watkai, Tanai, Hatem Kelai, Lashkar Kelai, Qasem Kor, Mata, Holai and Mazari China.

8. Tarakzi: From Tor Garrai which is the limes between the Alizis and Tarakzis to Danishkol and then from Danishkol to Mati the dwell in a straight line.

9. Khwajazi: from Mando Jorr and Alki Kohi which is the limes of the Baizi and Khwajazi to Khapash and Atmarkhel they dwell

10. Nazarkhel: In the south of the Atmarkhel lives the clan of Nazarkhel. Their lands are mountainous and their people live from trading. Their villages are: Kuz Kalai, Bar Kalai and Mullahkhel Kuz Kalai. Their number is 3000 individuals.

11. Babazi: They live in the valleys of Bedminai and Shamshad. Their lands are watered by rain and their crops are wheat and barley. A portion of them also deals and trades with goods.

Some other famous branches of the Mohmand are Burhankhel, Osmankhel and Mosakhel.

It shall be added that some Mohmand live in the Kunar province in Peshand, Khas Kunar, in Nangarhar province in Barikab, Lachapoor, Ghaziabad, Kama, Chaprihar, Lalma, Tarili, Ghazo Kelai, Ghorabad, Hadda, Basul and Hazar nau, Deka, Lalpur, Goshta, Gerdai, also in Kunar´s Shega, Arrkhi and Surdag.

There are Mohmands in Afghanistan´s other provinces also, like Balkh, Samangan, Kunduz, Herat, Kalat and Helmand.

Other Mohmand live as nomads all over Afghanistan.
The famous valleys of the Mohmand are: "De Gandau dara, de Pandiali dara, Kamali dara, Sarkand dara, de Daneshkol and Yakhdand dara, Bahi Dag, de

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:02 PM
Kakazai


The Kakazai (see spelling variants below) are a Pashtun (aka Pathan) tribe originally from the Laghman province of Afghanistan.

They came to South Asia during Afghan invasions such as those of Mahmud of Ghazni, settling in various regions.

A major Kakazai group from Gurdaspur, East Punjab settled in twelve villages, including Babal Chak, Faizullah Chak, Sut Kohiah (Satkoha), and Wazir Chak, near Dhariwal [1]. At the partition of India in August 1947, having been initially told they (being Muslim) would be in Pakistan, they were caught up in the ensuing violence and the survivors displaced when their area became part of India.

Today, the majority of the Kakazai reside in Pakistan and Afghanistan, in the areas of Dara Kakazai (Valley of Watlai), Bajaur Agency, Lahore, Sialkot, Dera Ghazi Khan, Quetta, Karachi, Kashmir, Isa Khel, Musa Khel, and Kakazai (Pishin, Baluchistan). Consequently, they do not exclusively speak Pashto, but may speak other languages indigenous to Pakistan such as Punjabi, Siraiki, and Balochi.

"Malik" is a common given name or surname among Kakazai Pashtuns.

Notable Kakazai Pashtuns include Nawab Bahadur Yar Jang, Abdullah Malik and the historian Khan Roshan Khan.

The name "Kakazai" means "offspring/children/sons of little/younger boy" (in Pashto, Kakay or Kaka = younger/little boy, Zai = offspring/children/sons of, a root also used in Yousafzai). Spelling variants include: Kakezai, Kakay Zai, Kakayzai, Kakeyzai, Kaka Zai and Kakkayzai.



Kakar


Kakar is a common surname of two contemporary communities living in Afghanistan ,India and Pakistan . The Kakars of Afghanistan and Pakistan are Muslim Pashtun

Kakar or Kaker is a Pashtun tribe located in Afghanistan and Pakistan. It is named for Kakar Afghan, who was the great-grandson of Qais Abdur Rashid. Kakar's father was Dani, son of Ghourghusht, son of Qais Abdur Rashid, according to the Afghan appendix of tribes. QAIS Abdur Rashid has proven to be a fictional character, created by the Lohdi employed notables who ruled certain counties of India at the time of the Moghuls.




Sanzarkhel
Taraghzai
Barakzai
Parizon
Mirdadzai
Jogizai
Abubakarzai
Abusyedzai
Sanzarkhel,Taraghzai or Taragharai and Santia(sub tribe of Abu Bakarzai Kakar) are the biggest sub-tribes of the Kakar in Balochistan.Historians such as Abdul Hai Habibi and Bahdur Shah Zafar Kakakhel are confident that Jadoon or Gadoon are also part of the Kakar.

Some of the Hindu also adopted Islam, but others remained Hindu. Among the Muslims, Kakars are mostly true Afghans. In the town of Kohana Abusyedzai Kakar, the Afghans exist in large numbers. They belong to the family of Malik Abdul Mali. Alikhel Kakar live in the District of Rohtik. Also, in other parts of India—especially Bihar and Bangol—Kakar is a known Afghan tribe. Kakar have descendants in Sarhad province of Pakistan but are mostly in Afghanistan and western Iran.

1 Sher Shah Suri and Kakar==
2 KAKAR (AFGHAN)

Sher Shah Suri and Kakar==

Sher Shah Suri or Sher Khan's real name was Farid Khan. His father's name was Hassan Khan and his grandfather's name wae Ibrahim Khan Suri. Ibrahim was a middle-class and common man of ROWA (an independent land of Afghans which included the territories of Hassanabdal, Kabul, Peshawar, Herat, Kandahar and Koh-e-Sulaiman), and belonged to the sub-tribe Barakzai of Kakar. Barakzai is a sub-tribe of Taraghzai, son of Kakar. According to Sir Olf Caero, the author of book The Pathans, Sher Shah was born Sihasram in (Bihar) in 1479 CE, where his father was a landlord and a respected ally of a Mughal Empire. The real homeland of Sher Shah was likely located between Qaisi Ghar and Koh-e-Sulaiman, near the Kozhak range.

Kalkar Najin, in his book Sher Shah and His Times, asserts that this place is between Chaman and Ghazni and that it is Sargorgai (Toba Kakar Ranges), where the Kakar tribe has been living for centuries. Sir Olaf claims that when Sher Shah was young, he hunted and killed a lion (likely a Bengal tiger) by his own sword—and since the lion is called "Sher" in Pashto and Persian, the people of the area began to call him "Sher Khan." Sher Shah's hunting of the lion using a sword is similar to the story of David.


KAKAR (AFGHAN)
A Short History

Kakar is the largest Pashtun tribe in Afghanistan and in Pakistan. Kakar Afghan was one of the grandsons of Qais Abdur RashidKakar,s father name was Dani son of Ghorghushet, son of Qais in the Afhgan appendix of tribes. According to Afghan and Muslim historion Ghorghushet was alive in 388 hijri(islamic celender)Kakar is also called in some part of afghanistan Kakar-khel.In Hirat Kakar is locally called KAK by public.In history some times it is called Kak-kor(family of Kak).The tomb of Kakar or Kak is in-forant of Hirat central Jamia Masjid,s gate.Afghan historions says that Kakar was burried firstly in Kohistan of Ghor provence of afghanistan,but King of Hirat Sultan Ghyasudin Tahglok bring his body to Hiratand do burried him in Mosque(Masjid)King Ghyasudin was also Kakar and belongs a sub tribe of Taghluk or Taghruq.Dani has four more sons named Panai,Babai,Naghar and Davi are also called by them selves kakar and now a part of Kakar tribe. Kakar has 18 his real sons and six are adopted sons so we can say that Kakar has 24 sons.Kakar eighteen son names are as follows,,,,

1-Taghruq 2-Taraghzai(Taragharai) 3-Jadram 4-Serad or Sherdad 4- Zalghozi 5-Dumar 6-Musazai or Musakhel 7-Younaskhel 8-Samkhel 9-Darpikhel or Arpikhel 10-Jalalkhel -11Mukranikhel -12 Rankhkhel 13- Essakhel 14- Sargarai 14-Kapip 16- Khatankhel 17- Yaqubzai 18-Osean and adopted sons names are -19-Pindar or Beadar 20-Churmaikhel 21-Lanbar 22-Farmalai 23-Kwaano and Taran.Taran was a son of a Syed.

Some famous sub tribes of Kakar Afghan are Sanzarkhel,Barakzai,Parizon,Abdullahzai,Jogizai , Abubakar-zai and much more.In every province of Aghanistan large numbers of Kakar are living.In Pakistan ,Balochistan province,eighty (80) percent of Pashtoons are Kakar Afghans. Quetta, Pishin, Qila Saifullah, Qlia Abdullah,Zhob, Loralai, Musakhel, Sibi and other districts are the other areas populated with Kakar.In Forntior province Kakar are living in a good numbers also in Panjab and Sindh.In India Kakar are found in Punjab, Haryana, Bulandshehr (a town of Kohana District) Rohtik, Hyderabad Daccan, Malwah (a town of khwaja) Bihar, Bangol,Assam ,Bombai and jona garh. In india some Kakar tribesmen converted to hinduism but many remain muslims, although some intellectuals say that these hindu Kakar are the slaves of Kakar Aghans who ruled India for a long time so they adopted the surname of Kakar.

by Ahmad Yar Khan KAKAR Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakar" attention :please do not try to write misinformation about kakar tribe.thanks


Mr Farooq Haider Kakar from district Pishin has done alot of work for the Kakar. and he has proved him self in the Kakar tribe very well. He belongs to Nida Qilla of District Pishin.


Khalil (tribe)

Khalil (Arabic: خليل ) is a Pashtun tribe living in Afghanistan and Pakistan. In the Peshawar valley, west and south-west of Daudzai lie the settlements of the Khalils. These are bounded on the south by the Bara stream. The Khalils like Mohmands and Daudzais claim to be descendants of Sultan Ibrahim Ghauri, son of Kand. There are four main sub-divisions in the Khalil,

Mattezai
Barozai
Ishakzai
Tallzrzai
A section of Khalil tribe to the north-west known as the Garhis was originally the joint property of the Khalil and Daudzai tribes. It was subsequently given as seri to Mians from whom the Khalil Arbabs purchased it and the latter are now the owners. The chief men in Khalil are called Arbabs and all belongs to the Mitha Khel (Ishakzai) sub-section. The Mitha-Khel hold their ancestral property, including the Garhis, revenue free on payment of the 1/4th of the assessments only. In the days when the Sikhs ruled in Peshawar the Khalil chiefs were very powerful. Since the Khyber Afridis have come under direct management, their assistance in external matters being no longer necessary, their power has declined.



Kundi

Kundi is a Pashtun tribe that lives in the Tank District in North West Frontier Province, Pakistan. Some scholars argue, their lineage links with the Marwat tribes, others mention that they are the descendant of Niazi tribe. When Niazis, in the early 18th century, immigrated from Tank to the plain of Marwat, many stayed behind, and they came to be known as the Kundis.

They have and continue to play a major role in the regional politics at the district and provincial level. Many have come to prominence at the national level in legal and political fields besides others. They were among the first few tribes to assimilate and welcome education to their villages. They primarily live in the villages of Amakhel Sharif, Pai, Landhoor, Daraki, Muhammad Akbar, and also surrounding settlements including Gul Imam, Abizar, ShahAlam, Ranwal, Wandazaloo and Khwarabad etc.

Geographically they lie between the PATA (Privincially Administrated Tribal Area) of the Bhittani tribe on the west side, and Marwat tribe on the North and East side and Jat & Gandapur on the south.

Among the kundi tribe, Chief Justice (Rtd) Abdul Karim Khan Kundi, is a very well known and respected figure. He belongs to the village Pai. His contributions to the judicial system in Pakistan and personal contributions to the well being of the Kundi tribe are very well recognised.



Kharoti

Kharoti is a Pashtun tribe. The tribe has an estimated population of about 2.5 million and is based in Afghanistan. In Afghanistan, the main provinces where Kharoti tribe members reside are Helmand, Zabul, Herat, Kunduz, Laghman, Nangahar, Bagram, Wardag, Logur, Ghazni and Kandahar. They live in and around Kohistan. In the east, they range from Katta to Koh-e-Sulaiman to Barmal. Another area of large Kharoti population is the area of Oragoon where they are accompanied by Furmalis and Tajiks. The Kharoti tribe is of Ghilzai origin. Their tribal rivals are Waziris and Furmalis, both of whom believe the Furmali area belongs to them. Some of the important subsects of the Kharoti tribe are Zako Khel, Ya Khel, Adya Khel, Amand Khel, Shamu Khel, Suleman Zai, Khadar Khel, Zobi Khel and Kharmoozi.


Khattak

Khattak or Khatak is a Pashtun tribe. Khattak tribe is concentrated in North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan.

The Khattak are a Pashtun tribe whose recorded history indicates that they originated in the area aound logar and ghazni. speaking a variant of the kandahari pashtu, their shaggy and hard appearance belies an origin akin to the old pawindah type. they are accorded the status of being one of the original and true afghans. Earliest records show their migration from around modern day Bannu northwards towards modern day Kohat, Karak and Nowshera.

A warrior poet by the name of Khushal Khan Khattak (1613-1690) belonged to this tribe, and his contributions to Pushto literature are considered as classic texts. They have been translated into numerous languages.

The Khattaks have high literacy rate in comparison to other Pashtun tribes having achieved positions of influence throughout history.


Khattak Dance

martial dance by the Khattak tribe of Pashtuns. The fast tempo with which the Khattak dance starts and ends distinguishes it from all the other Pakhtun folk dances which are described as Atanr (Pashto word for a family of identical folk dances). Except for the Khattak dance, all the other Pakhtoon folk dances or Atanr start with a slow tempo and get fast as the momentum picks up with a corresponding faster beat. Khattak dance a special type of music is composed the main instrument for it is the piper clarion. Large drums beaten with sticks. The Khattak dance has three kinds of cultural dances.

They are called Shahdola, Bhangrha, and Bulbullah.


Another important dissimilarity between the Khattak dance and other folk dances is the absence of Sanrry (oily hair grown up to a specific length), which the Khattak dancers don't have. The dance comprises a total of 12 steps requiring the dancers to have the best of skills to perform. At one moment they would be performing individually and in a fraction of seconds they would align their body movements with the rest of the troupe members - whose number may be as high as 40.

In the Bhangrah every member swirls while carrying swords as the prop. The Bhangrah is followed by Derabi. At this stage, two youths at a time, carrying one sword and a handkerchief each in their hands, start dancing in front of the man with surnai while the rest of the troupe members wait for their turn. In the Laila, the third step, a group of four performers holding two swords each, perform stunts moving in a circle.

Braghoni is the fastest and the most adventurous of all steps, which a single dancer performs with three swords. He very skillfully swings two swords in the air while holding the third in his mouth.

Bulbullah, the last of the twelve steps, is staged without swords. The dancers sing a love song at a high pitch. At the end of the song, the drumbeat increases slightly and the dance goes on.


History of Athan (Attan or Khatak) dance

Males performing the Attan dance in traditional clothing.See also Music of Afghanistan

A British journalist of Pashtun origin, Amanullah Ghilzai, through his scientific study has traced the roots of Athan or "Khatak dance" to the ancient Greek dance of almost the same name. According to his theory, the dance which is internationally known as Khatak, while among the Afghans and Pashtuns as Athan, is actually one of the earliest forms of the ancient Greek dances, called "Athena" attributed to the Greek Goddess of War, Wisdom and Patriotism, of the same name. The Greeks had brought this dance with them to Bactria, ancient Afghanistan about 23 centuries ago when they had colonised this region for several centuries. During this period a sizable chunk of the Greek population had moved to Afghanistan and some western and northern-western parts of Pakistan, mentioned as "Yawanas" in the ancient Hindu books. The dance "Athan" also "Attan", seems to have been preserved in one of its earliest forms by members of the Khatak and some other Pashtun tribes, including the Ghilzais. The Athan dance is performed by many Pashtuns but each of the tribes has changed it a bit or a lot while the name "Athan" remains the same. In the ancient Greece, the dance Athena had the same definition and reverence attached to it as most Pashtuns would still attach to Athan. The dance Athena seems to have disappeared in Greece during the Christian era while interestingly, the Athan survived in Afghanistan and Pashtun parts of Pakistan.[1]



Khushal Khan Khattak

Khushal Khan Khattak (1613 - 1689)(Pashto: خوشحال خان خټک) was a famous Pashtun (Afghan) warrior, poet and tribal chief of the Khattak tribe. He wrote in Pashtu and Persian during the reign of the Mughal (Mongol) emperors in the seventeenth century, and admonished Afghans to forsake their divisive tendencies and unite to regain the strength and glory they once possessed. A renowned fighter who became known as the "Afghan Warrior Poet", he lived in the foothills of the Hindu Kush mountains.

Khushal Khan was born in Akora (today in modern day district Nowshera Pakistan), Malik Akoray, grandfather of Khushhal Khan, was the first Khattak to enjoy widespread fame during the reign of the Mughal King Jalal-ud-din Akbar. He moved from Teri (A village in district Karak) to Sarai Akora, the town was founded and built by him. Malik Akoray joined hands with the Mughals to safeguard the trunk route and was generously rewarded for his assistance. The Akor Khels still hold a prominent position in the Khattak tribe. The Khattak tribe of Khushhal Khan now lives in the areas of Kohat, Nowshera, Peshawar, Mardan in the North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan.

Khushhal Khan Khattak was the son of Shahbaz Khan and was born in 1613. From the very beginning, Khushhal Khan’s life was marked by events of great significance. He led an eventful life that can be divided into three important parts — his youth and adult life during which he was mostly engaged in the service of the Mughal King and finally his old age in which he was preoccupied by the idea of the unification of Pakhtuns.

His first involvement in war occurred when he was just 13 years old. Shah Jehan appointed him as the tribal chief and Mansabdar at the age of 28 after the death of his father. By appointment of the Mughul emperor, Shah Jehan, Khushhal succeeded his father in 1641, but in 1658, Aurangzeb, Shah Jehan's successor, locked him away as a prisoner in the Gwaliar fortress in Delhi.

After Khushhal was permitted to return to Afghanistan, he incited the Afghans to rebel against the Mughal Emperor Aurenzeb. His grave carries the inscription:da afghan pa nang me watarla tura, nanagyalai da zamana khushal khattak yam "I have taken up the sword to defend the pride of the Afghan, I am Khushal Khattak, the honorable man of the age." Khushhal Khan Khattak died on February 25, 1689, in Dambara.

The Mazar of Khushal Khan Khattak is situated near the Railway Station of Akora Khattak in Nowshera district.

Published works

His poetry consists of more than 45,000 poems. According to some historians the number of books written by him is more than 200. His more famous books are Baz Nama, Fazal Nama, Distar Nama and Farrah Nama. Major Raverty was the first British writer who translated ninety eight poetic pieces of Khattak in English, the book is called Selections from the Poetry of Afghans published in 1862 in Kolkata. This was followed by Biddulph’s translation Selections from the Poetry of Khushhal Khan Khattak in 1890 published in London. Then, Evelyn Howell and Olaf Caroe jointly translated and published The Poems of Khushhal Khan Khattak in 1963 from the University of Peshawar. Another translation was the English translation was done by Dr N. Mackenzie (Poems from the Diwan of Khushhal Khan Khattak published from London in 1965). Dost Mohammad Khan Kamil was the first Pakhtoon scholar who initiated research on Khattak along scientific lines and penned down two important and comprehensive books, one in English called On a Foreign Approach to Khushhal and the other in Urdu titled Khushhal Khan Khattak published in 1952. Diwan-i- Khushhal Khan Khattak was published under the directive of H.W. Bellew in 1869 (Jail Press, Peshawar), the manuscript of which was provided by Sultan Bakhash Darogha, an employee of the British government. More recently his poetry has been translated again

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:06 PM
Lodhi

Lodhigando or Lodigando is a Pashtun tribe, most likely a sub-group of the larger Ghilzai of Afghanistan and Pakistan who were part of a wave of Pashtuns who pushed east into what is today Pakistan and India. Often accompanying the Turkic who conquered South Asia, the Lodhi established themselves during the Islamic period in South Asia as a Muslim ruling class and were valued warriors.

Members of this tribe established the Lodhi dynasty, which ruled over the Delhi Sultanate and included the prominent ruler Ibrahim Lodhi.

The Lodhi family name is common amongst the Pashtuns. The name is commonly double-barreled with the title of Khan. A typical Lodhi's surname is titled thus: as "Khan Lodhi" or "Khan-Lodhi", while others may prefer to keep the surname "Khan" or "Lodhi". It is important to note that a Khan might not necessarily be of the Lodhi tribe. Lodhi tribe is settled in Afghanistan, NWFP, Punjab and India.


Lodhi dynasty

Lodhi Dynasty belonged to the Pashtun Ghilzai tribe of Afghans and ruled over the Delhi Sultanate during its last phase. It ruled from 1451 to 1526 CE.

Bahlul Lodhi: After the last Sayyid ruler of Delhi, Mohammed-bin-Farid, died in 1451, Bahlul Khan Lodhi, a warrior and governor of Punjab, took the throne of the Delhi sultanate. He quelled uprisings in the provinces and garnered political support by granting extensive lands to his native Afghan nobles.

Sikandar Lodhi: Bahlul nominated his second son, Sikandar Lodhi (born Nizam Khan) to succeed him. However, nobles backed the rule of Barbak Shah, his elder son, who had been appointed viceroy of Jaunpur. A power struggle ensued; Sikandar eventually won the struggle against Barbak and his ally, Hussain Shah of Jaunpur. He proved to be a capable ruler, and was somewhat merciful to his opponents. He allowed Barbak the governorship of Jaunpur and also resolved differences with an uncle, Alam Khan, who had conspired to overthrow him. Sikandar also brought many Afghan nobles under his control, conquered Gwalior and Bihar, and encouraged trade across his holdings. He was a kind ruler and founded the present-day city of Agra in 1503.

Ibrahim Lodhi: Sikandar's son Ibrahim Lodhi took the throne in 1517. His rule began on a problematic note; in an attempt to divide his kingdom, the nobles recognized his break-away brother Jalal Khan as independent ruler over Jaunpur. Ibrahim had his brother assassinated in an attempt to consolidate power. However, he never really gained the support of his nobles, as he ruled by fear. He was very strict and disrespectful to his nobles.

Ibrahim retook Gwalior in a military campaign and then menaced Mewar, then ruled by Rana Sanga. Under the premise that Ibrahim threatened to expand the Delhi Sultanate into the desert regions of Rajasthan, which had largely been left alone by previous sultans, Rana Sanga was able to unite the rajput chieftains of the desert into a shortlived military alliance. This alliance made common cause with discontented Muslim nobles of the sultanate to invite Babur, the ruler of Kabul, to overthrow the Lodhi dynasty.

Babur was officially invited to take India by Daulat Khan Lodhi, a governor in Lahore, and by Alam Khan, an uncle of Sultan Ibrahim Lodhi. Babur was able to defeat the Lodhis at the Battle of Panipat in 1526. His army's use of artillery, plus the desertion of many nobles and soldiers from Ibrahim Lodhi's forces, led to victory despite being Babur being heavily outnumbered. This victory caused the Delhi sultanate to be supplanted by the Mughal Dynasty founded by Babur.

The Lodhis continued to control Agra, until it too was taken by Mogul emperor Akbar the Great.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:10 PM
Mahsud

is a famous Pashtun tribe in Waziristan, Pakistan. Mahsud tribe lives in the very centre of Waziristan being hemmed by in on three sides by the Darwaish Khel Wazirs, and being shut off by the Bhittanis on the east from the Derajat and Bannu districts. Two Pashtoon tribes, Ahmadzai Wazir and Mahsud, inhabit and dominate South Waziristan. There are also some Burkis, a small ethnic group that has been living in between mahsud tribes and speaks there special language "burki". The Waziris live on both sides of the Durand Line that serves as a border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Usually they pronounce their name "Mahsid". They are divided into three great clans namely Alizai, Bahlolzai and Shaman Khel. Mahsud tribe is that tribe who can never even think of submitting to a foreign power that stepped on their land. These are the words of Sir Olaf Caroe who acted as the former governor of the Frontier. From 1860 to 1937, the English forces constantly attacked Mahsood positions in order to subdue them but never got a foothold in the area. It was 1860 when 3000 Mahsud tribesmen attacked the British regiment base in Tank (Present South Waziristan). The British had a tough time handling them.

After the end of the 1st world war in 1919, the British again headed towards Waziristan. This time, they built roads and forts throughout the land. It was during this time that the name of Powenda Mullah emerged. He would later on bask in fame and glory the likes of which no other tribesman of the area will experience.

Powenda means nomad in Pashto. Soon in 1897 AD Mujahed tribesmen again stood up against the British all the way from Chitral to Quetta and the British were again given a serious head ache of dealing with them.

Day after day, Mullah Powenda became even more popular and famous. He had attained a legendary figure status among the people from far and wide. There even was a time when he was considered as the sole leader of all the Waziristan country by the British.

His followers would kill an English officer sometimes here sometimes there. And the British would not be able to nab them because the attackers would swoop back to their mountain hideouts like eagles. Many things were tried to stop such acts but to no avail.

In 1907 AD, the Wazir and Mahsud tribesmen were blocked from entry into any government controlled territory. Economic sanctions were placed on them so that even basic amenities of life like food and medicine could be blocked from going into their hands.

The English commander of that time, Timothy Blockaded the areas of Makin and Kaniguram. Various areas were searched to arrest Powenda Mullah But to no avail.

The English thought that the tribesmen were receiving weapons from the Indian ocean at the south by the Balochistan lands. For this, they affixed check posts far and wide but again, no benefit was obtained.

When the First World War started in 1919 AD, the English were concerned that they would be engaged in battle on more than one fronts which was not a good omen for their safety and their economy; hence they decided to close those fronts of less significance. For this, they abandoned their ‘Forward Policy’ for the time being and sent a message of friendship and peace to the tribes. The Tribes did not trust the British and that was the reason that they rejected any such peace proposals. Instead, the Mahsuds put in place a Lashkar to attack the British. By this time, the British had established an Air Force in the sub continent. Their Air force would bombard the whole countryside of Waziristan thus killing and maiming thousands of Tribesmen. All this was an open message of hatred on behalf of the British to the Tribes. The tribes got this message and their hatred for the British grew as well. Due to their sufferings, they were bent upon taking revenge and hence their moral increased. A series of attacks were made by the Mahsuds inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. One attack was that on the Marhatta Regiment in which hundreds of sepoys and 5 British Officers were killed. Another was that on the Punjab regiment in which the Ghazis slaughtered everyone. The aerial bombardments had inflicted staggering losses on the tribesmen but they were content that they were also doing well and had killed around 250 of the enemy forces.

The sophistication acquired by the British (air force) helped create a secure atmosphere for the ground troops because they would constantly patrol the sky’s. With this sense of security, the British Army constructed a metalled road from Jandola to Ladha. At Razmak, they constructed a cantonment for their army officers and soldiers.

By 1922-23, all the British Army had moved from Wana to Razmak. They had also constructed an airport in Razmak. Instead of flying all the way from India, their aircraft would fly from Razmak Airport and bombard the countryside. Because of this, the countryside of Makin was totally devastated. The Mahsuds deemed it appropriate at this time to agree to a ceasefire because this new tactic adopted by the British was inflicting wide scale losses on their side. The ceasefire would also enable them to devise a strategy of how to counter the latest British advances.

Mulla Powenda died in 1913 AD. It can be said without doubt that he was the crown-less emperor of one of the most fierce some of Pashtoon Tribes; the Mahsuds. Upon his death, his son Shah Fazal Din was given leadership whereas his Son in Law Mulla Abdul Hakeem was appointed adviser. Mahsud tribe is divided in three subtribes, Mahsud's usually call it as dray maseed. Each tribe has his own KHAN i.e ELDER, GEE KHAN LANGERKHEL is one of the most prominent personality of the Mahsud tribe.

Historically, the Wazirs and Mahsuds have always looked toward Afghanistan as their real home, and throughout the British Colonial period, they supported Afghan kings in their wars against the British.

‘They are poor but brave… and although turbulent and difficult to deal with, still have a great love of their country and cherish their independence, possessing qualities that we admire ourselves, and which deserve consideration and respect’.
John Ayde describes Mahsud in above words.

Mahsud are very good marksmen and have the reputation of trustworthy. Mahsud is the most independent of all the tribes. Even their own maliks have a very limited control over these independent spirits. However, since independence, Mahsuds have been increasingly integrated with the Pakistani society.
Since independence, many social, economic and demographic changes have occurred in Waziristan. The large number of Mahsuds has joined the mainstream Pakistani society. When the Hindu traders of Tank left after the partition in 1947, most of their shops were taken over by Mahsuds. Now Mahsuds are employed in militia and regular army, state bureaucracy and involved in business all around the country. Many of them are now living far away from their native lands.
Immediately after independence, Mahsuds raise tribal lashkar which entered Kashmir. They quickly reached the outskirts of Srinagar defeating the Maharaja’s troops. The home of Mahusd is an inhospitable mountainous terrain bordering between Afghanistan and Pakistan. This location has given them the flexibility to maintain some independence from central authorities of both countries. Like all other tribes, Mahsud cherish their independence and are fully conscious of their reputation of ‘honour’ and ‘bravery’. They use these qualities to convey their ethnic superiority. Mahsud efforts to resist any penetration of their enclave was due to their intense independent spirit which almost borders on anarchy. In this ‘the Mahsud effort was inspired by a deep-seated instinct which drove the tribe at all costs to resist subjection and to preserve their own peculiar way of life’. Every Mahsud considers himself as an equal to other Mahsud. The sentiment was well expressed by a Mahsud leader GEE KHAN LANGERKHEL who told Evelyn Howell that ‘Let it be field’. Blow us all up with cannon, or make all eighteen housand of us Nawabs’ suggesting that all were equal. Gradual change has occurred in Waziristan due to increased interaction of tribes with government and settled districts adjoining them. The most significant experiment of British was raising of Militias (later called Scouts) from the area. It gave the tribesman an alternative to boring life of tending the fields. The system has all the incentives which a tribesman can enjoy. He is clothed, fed and given cash. He is given a good rifle, the prized possession and he lives in his own hills with opportunities to use his rifle. In last fifty years, the region has seen a dramatic change where the tribal society is increasingly attached to the settled area both economically and socially. This has limited some of the independence which the tribesman’s forefathers enjoyed. If he chooses to challenge the central authority, he has to suffer more than his forefathers. On the other hand the government’s authority to punish the whole tribe is also restricted to some extent due to increased integration of tribesmen into settled districts. In modern times, a more imaginative policy is needed to handle this delicate situation.

‘They fight for the love of fighting, and though at the moment they are contented and peaceful, they say openly that they must soon relieve the monotony by having a rising’. Wife of Viceroy Lord Minto after the visit to the frontier tribes April



Mamund

The Mamund are a Pashtun tribe of around 12,000 people and are one of the four clans of Tarkanis. The tribe is located principally in the Watelai valley, but also own villages on both sides of the Durand Line.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:14 PM
Marwat

Marwat مروت, a well known branch of Pashtun tribe, are the direct descendents of a Persian Prince Shah Hussain of the house of Ghor (Afghanistan) and Bibi Mato (Daughter of Sheikh Baittan). The clan is named after 'Marwat', who was the great grandson of Ibrahim Lodhi or Lodi (second son of Prince Shah Hussain/Bib Mato and younger brother of Ghiji or Ghilzai). Their primary abode is District Lakki Marwat in the southern NWFP of Pakistan. They are also settled in other places such as Tank and Dera Ismail Khan districts. Other tribes which live around them are Khattak, Wazir, Betani, Mahsud, Banuchi, and Niazi.


Origin Of Marwat
Most of the Pashtoons trace their origin from Qais. It is said that he had gone to Makkah where Muhammad gave him the name of Abdur Rashid. Due to his piety, decency, wit and wisdom he was widely known and respected in the area. Abdur Rashid (Qais) had three sons. Named Baittan, Ghorghust and Sarban. Baittan was the third. Most of the Pashtuns tribes trace their origin from Sheikh Baittan or Bait Baba.

However, some scholars challenge his theory. Bahadur Shah Zafar Kaka Khel, A renowned historian has discussed in detail various theories in his voluminous book "Pukhtane Da Tareekh Pa Rana ke" (Pakhtoons in Historical Perspective). Syed Awar-e-Haq Jeelani has translated his work in Urdu under the title of "Pushtun Tareekh Kay Ayeenay Main" (Peshawar, University Book Agency, 1964).

Some theoreticians consider that before the coming down of the Saka tribes of Aryans from the Central Asia, people were already living in the area now called Afghanistan. Those people were skilled in fighting and diplomacy that compelled the invaders to mention them in their epics.


[edit] Baittan Baba and Prince Shah Hussain
Baittan baba was a puritan and pious saint of this region. His daughter, named Matto, was married to one Syed Shah Hussain, known as a prince of Persia. In a state of distress, Shah Hussain came to seek the blessing of Baittan Baba. Here, he took to worship and prayers and earned the favour of his mentor. The marriage of Shah Hussain and Matto generated some romantic stories. The oft-repeated story says;

"A Persian prince, Shah Hussain, on account of intense penury and indigence, was driven to the necessity of seeking succour from Bait Baba. He also remained engaged in singing hymns and worship. Finally, he was enamoured of the beautiful tresses of a beautiful maiden, the daughter of the Bait Baba. He fell deeply in love with the Baba’s daughter, captivating belle. Bulk of work of piety did not thwart the emotions of love to avoid the scandal of their secret marriage. The first issue of Bibi Matto was named as Ghalzae, the thief son, and the other was named Ibrahim Lodhi."

"One day, Ibrahim brought meal to his grand father, Baittan, who was so pleased that he uttered these words for him "loe-day" (he is a great one). This word later on became on Lodhi."

Shah Hussain had another wife; name Mahi. She was the daughter of Kaaghdoam who was a Karlanee Pashtoon. The offspring of these two (Mahi and Matto) were known as Mathi tribes. Some other scholars believe that the name of the tribes became popular after the name of Bibi Matto.

Shah Hussain, a Persian Prince, was a Syed. Due to the atrocious attitude of the Umayyad and Abbasid dynasties, many Syed families immigrated and settled in Persia and Khurasan (other parts of Afghanistan). On account of the defaulting attitude of the rulers towards the Sadat, the puritans kept their identity secret. It is just possible that predecessors of Shah Hussain, although Syed they were, might have arrogated for themselves the status of “Princes' of Persia”. But in common parlance, Pukhtuns call a Syed as Bacha or Shahji (king) owing to deference.


[edit] Bibi Matto
Bibi Matto had six sons. Amongst them, Ghalzai and Ibrahim Lodhi became more famous. Their genealogical tree shows that Ibrahim Lodhi had three sons; each founding a sub tribe after his respective name. Among those sub tribes, the Lohani became more famous. Marwats are descendants of the Lohani sub tribe. They are subdivided into four clans (also known as Khels) known as Salars, Tappay, Mussa and Nuna.

Some writers reject this theory and try to malign the pious person of Baittan Baba. Raverty leads the Group that has spared no chance to sling mud on this noble personality. Disparagement of such a pious man in fabulous stories is highly objectionable and does not appeal to the sound mind. The romantic story of Shah Hussain and Bibi Matto is a creative ingenuity. Shah Hussain was allowed to live in the house of Baittan. He won the heart of his host who felt strong desire to give daughter’s hand in marriage to him.

The Marwats form one of the four Great sub-tribes of the Lohani tribes and are also known as Speen Lohani (white Lohanis). However, it is evident that the Marwat and the rest of Baittan tribes are the combination of the three best ancestries of Asia. In their veins, flows the Persian, the Israeli and Turkish Blood. The history of the Marwat tribe is old, interesting and revealing. The recent research in the field highlights a fascinating story of this tribe, The Lineage of this tribe goes back to the Pre-Islamic era.

Following interpretations have been made in this connection by Dr Chiragh Hussain in his book Dood-e-Chiragh:

The predecessor or the ancestor of the Marwat was named as Marwat.
There is a hill in Katwaz. Afghanistan, which is called Marwati. The Marwat tribe formerly inhabited there, and so they were named Marwat.
The word Marwat is derived from Arabic word “Murrawat”, which means compassion, generosity and manliness. This really reflects and interprets the word Marwat on account of their moral values, habits, social contacts and hospitality even to day. In the past, the Aryan Chiefs took oath in the name of the Marwat tribe’s modesty, when they were sworn as leaders of their tribe’s.
The modern Western historians are of the view that all these old names are of geographical importance. For instance, Bait is the center of river Dajla and Farrat, and Haroot and Maroot are the names of two tribes. They were famous in the past for their purity. In the ancient religious books they have been mentioned in literary and allegorical sense.

[edit] Exodus from Katawaz
The original homeland of the Marwat's was Katawaz, South of Ghazni in Afghanistan. Now the Sulaiman Khel Tribe occupies this land. The Marwats migrated to Daman (present day Tank) and settled in this area. Under the stress of adverse circumstances some of them moved to other lands in the subcontinent.

Writers have expressed different views regarding the exodus of this tribe from Katawaz. One version goes as:

"A petty servant of the Sulaiman Khel tribe abducted a woman form the house of Azad Sultan Khel and sought asylum with the Marwat Tribe; who provided asylum to them under their convention (Nanawati). The Sulaiman Khel demanded extradition and handing over of the culprits, which the Marwat declined as they were bound by traditions to protect the honour and life of refugees under their protection.

On refusal of several requests, the Sulaiman Khel were left with no other option but to attack the Marwats with full force. The Marwat were strong enough to withstand and repulse their initial attack. Then the Sulaiman Khel sought the help of other clans of the Ghilzai tribe, who answered the call positively. The combined force of the Ghilzai clans overpowered the Marwat tribe. To avoid the constant threat from the rival clans, the Marwats decided to migrate to some remote parts. Hence their subsequent migration to the Daman Area."

We cannot ignore the fact that permanent settlement in old days was difficult. The whole tribe travelled and settled at places where better grazing grounds were found. Furthermore, as “might is right” goes, tribes with less fighting strength had to leave the place for stronger invaders. The Marwat, being less in number, migrated to safer places; Hence their migration to the Tank area.

Dr. Syed Chiragh Hussain says, "The early history of the Marwat is cloudy due to non availability of proper record like other Pashtoon tribes. However, in 1451 AD when the Delhi Sultanate was captured by Lodhis, then the trace of the Marwat is to be found in his reign. Bahlol Lodhi’s call for getting land (Jagirs) in Hindustan was warmly received here. Khawas Khan Marwat was one of the famous Generals in Sher Shah Suri’s reign. He had lost his life during the war of succession won by Salim Shah Suri.”

According to an account, the settlement period of the Marwat in the Daman area is probably during the reign of Lodhis. Sir Denzil Ibbitson does not agree to it. In his view the Marwat settled here in the reign of Moghul Emperor Akbar.

However, their stay in the Daman area was not long. They took new feuds on distribution of water with the Raees (Chief) of Tank, Shah Nawaz Khan Katti Khel. The Katti Khels were also their cousins. Marwats came around Tank and were in a position to drive the Katti Khels out of it. However, Shah Nawaz Khan sought help from the Gandapur and Mian Khel families and repulsed the Marwat attack. As a result, they were driven out of Daman and forced to migrate towards the Baeena Pass (Dara Pezu - the current site of Lucky Cement Factory).

Thus for one reason or the other they migrated to Daman and then Pezu via Gomal Pass. “Most of them ultimately settled in Tank with Niazis (also a branch of Lodhi group) who had been in the past driven in the same manner from their original lands”.


[edit] Arrival Period
Mira Jan Sayal writes in his book "Da Pukhtano Qabilo Shajare" that, "The Marwat arrived in this area during the early years of the reign of the Mughal King Akbar (1556-1605). They took advantage of the internal dissension among the Niazis, expelled them from this area and settled on the right bank of river Gambilla. Mayar, a branch of Niazis, sought help from the Marwat against its fellow Niazis Clan, Sarhang. The Marwat attacked the Niazis under Malik Qatal Khan and other Maliks. In a severe battle near Tatti Michan Khel, the Niazis were completely defeated and pushed towards Esa Khel. Among them, only the Michan Khels were spared due to their neutrality and religious position."

With the conquest of such a vast area, the Marwats dropped the idea of taking back Tank form Shah Nawaz Katti Khel, who extended his hand for friendship. This was accepted for the sake of guarding that Frontier.


[edit] Occupation of Lakki Marwat
For some time the Marwats confined themselves to pastoral pursuits. When their number increased, groups of families went out of the close settlement and spread over the vast plain - each within rather undefined limits of the allotment of the section to which it belonged. Such groups in turn became centres from which further migration took place. Thus in course of time the whole plain became populated. A large proportion of the Marwat settled down as agriculturists. Each community cultivated and held its land according to the "Wesh Tenure".

During the Mughal period, the Marwats; being little interrupted by others and being strong and united enough to defy any encroachment by other neighbouring tribes, enjoyed the singular good fortune of being left to themselves, and this developed and worked out their ancient communal institutions.

Meanwhile, the Mughal Empire, which was already on decline received a deathblow as its province on the right bank of the Indus River was conquered by Ahmed Shah Durrani in 1756. The whole territory of the Marwats came under the Kingdom of Afghanistan. It was ruled by the Durani King for more than 70 years; although practically they remained independent. In fact, this area was not regularly occupied because at that time, the Marwats lived a nomadic life. When attacked from any side they would simply migrate towards the hills with all their goods and cattle. During such visitations the material loss was not great, as those who led nomadic pastoral life retired with their flocks and herds into the hills, and those who tilled the soil either remained with the royal revenue collectors or fled to the hills. Thus beyond a partial destruction of his crops, no Marwat lost much as the stay of the Kabul troops was never long and the burning of his house only gave him an extra trouble of procuring a few ox-loads of reeds from the marsh and twigs from the jungle and building a hut of them.

In the words of Ghulam Habib Afghani, for the Marwats, the capturing of such a vast area was greater than their needs and they did not feel sorry for Tank which they had lost earlier. This vastness of land was the reason why there was no internal conflict. But the Niazis and the Ghazni Khel Khattaks from the east, and Kati Khel, Sulaiman Khel Wazir and Mahsoods from the south repeatedly attacked the Marwats. But due to their unity, they succeeded every time to repulse these attacks. They opposed any type of intervention from any tribe till Edward took the whole area under his control for his political objectives.

The Marwats fought almost sixty battles against different tribes for safeguarding their frontiers. Sarfaraz Khan Khattak admits this fact in his book, “Tareekh-e-Khattak”.


[edit] Disunity and Division
Gund bazi (tribal jealousy)

Unluckily this unity could not remain for a long time. The Marwats were divided into two gawands (groups) known as Speen-Gund (the white group) and Tor-Gund (the black group). This division among the Marwats is known as Gund Bazi (internal rivalry). The Speen-Gund includes Mama Khel, Begu Khel, Maidad Khel etc, whereas the Tor Gund includes Isa Khel, Ghazni Khel, Adam Zai, Tatter Khel etc.

Initially all Maliks accepted the eldest man as the leader and considered his decision final and followed that. During the conflicts with Ghiljis, Wazirs, Dawars, Masoods, Niazis and Daulat Khels, decisions were taken by the headman and they were obeyed. However, in the wake of Gund Bazi the Marwat clans split into two groups. The leader of each Gund was supported by the allied Maliks. Basically the Gund Bazi started with a conflict between Begu Khels and Isak Khels. Maidad Khels joined the Begu Khel Gund and Ghazni Khel joined the Isak Khel Gund. Meena Khels held an important position due to their occupation of the Lakki City.

The Gund Bazi started when Salar Khan Maidad Khel; being proud of his Maliki (Chieftancy) tried to destabilize the Maliki of Sikandar Khan Azghar Khel with respect to Lakki City. Sikander Khan along with Sadar Khan Isak Khel attacked Salar Khan near village Dalo Khel (presently located on Tajazai-Lakki Highway). Salar Khan, his two brothers and five other men were killed. As a result of this Gul Rang Khan; son of Saleem Khan Miandad Khel became the Malik. He was bold, courageous and dashing and he fought several battles against the Khattaks.

Another Malik who was aspiring to share the Maliki with Gul Rang Khan was Gulan Khan of Tatter Khel. Gul Rang Khan had him killed on the plea that Gulan Khan showed cowardice during the Khattak campaign. When Almar Khan Isak Khel came to Sardar Samand Khan Begu Khel, he sided with Gulrang Khan. From that time, the Marwat tribe was divided into two groups.

“Any type of attack on one man was considered an attack on the whole Gund and it was responded to by the whole Gund. The whole Gund became a party to the happiness and sadness of a member of his own Gund”.

In the words of Ghulam Habib Afghani, other tribes took great advantage of this disunity because a lot of money and resources were spent on the procurement of weapons. Due to this Gund Bazi, Nawab Hafeez Ahmed Khan of Mankera was invited in 1819 to capture this area and secure taxes. Later on, the Nawab abandoned this area in favour of the Sikhs in 1823.


[edit] The People
Majority of the Marwats reside in and around Lakki Marwat, which had been a Tehsil of District Bannu for more than 132 years but became a district in early nintees of 20th century. A small proportion of other tribes also settled here. The main reason is that the area had remained economically un-developed through the ages and had a little attraction for new settlers.

The people of the Marwat tribe are strong, sturdy, and tall, of very sound physique and fair complexion (many are blonde with either green or blue eyes). About the people of this area Sir Herbert says, “the Marwat descend from the pure and nice generation of the trans-Indus area, tall, stout, handsome, candid with rosy cheeks generally. These entire features are due to their pure and nice Afghan origin and probably this is the reason that they are very dignified and generous and meet the strangers with great courtesy, They are very generous towards their woman folk as compared to the other tribes of Pathans”.

Like other Pashtoons, Marwats are also divided into numerous Khels. The tribe is territorially divided into three great Tappas, viz, Dreplara, Musakhel-cum-Tappi, and Behram (subdivided into minor tappas Umar Khan Khel and Tatezai)

The two branches of Salar, i.e. Khado Khel and Achu Khel, along with Aba Shaheed Khel Sadat family, are known as dreplara. (Children of three parents). According to the distribution of land (Wesh System), Tappa Musa Khel and Noona Khel settled in the western part of Lakki Marwat. Behram in the middle and Dreplara in the eastern part.

Since most of the territory occupied by the Musa Khel (Kot Kashmir, Gandi Khan Khel. Mama Khel, Bayist Khel, Takhti Khel, Bragi, Shatoora), Noona Khel and Tapey is Pakha (solid) area, therefore they are called Pakha Marwat (Solid Marwat). The area occupied by Dreplaree is sandy. Hence they are called Saga Marwat (Sandy Marwat).

Some important Khels are:

1. Musa Khel with sections Takhti Khel, Januzai and Pasanni

2. Achu Khel with sections Begu Khel, Isak Khel, and Ahmad Khel

3. Khadu Khel with sections Sikandar Khel, and Mammu Khel

4. Nawab Khel with Nar Muzzafar Khan

5. Bahram Khel with sections Umar Khan Khel and Totezai; the latter with sub-sections Tajazai, Dilkhozai, Ghazni Khel, and lastly Tappi.

6. Mina Khel who live in the heart of the city with a strong hold.

They speak softer Pashto which is very simlar to the Pashto spoken in Qandahar (Afghanistan) and Quetta (Pakistan).

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:17 PM
Mashwanis

The Mashwani (also Moshwani, Mishwani, Miswani) are a tribal group, living predominantly in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The progenitor of the Mashwanis was a Syed, that is a descendant of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, Sayed Muhammad Hamzah married a Pashtun woman of Kakar Tribe and he has a son name Sayed Masud (Moshwani). While Verdak and Honey from an another woman of Pushtoon Tribe and Sherani. Since the Pashtun lineage traditionally stems from the father, this tribe is not recognised as Pashtun according to Pashtunwali. Mashwanis names frequently have the prefix "Syed", meaning belonging to the family of Muhammad.

They are well settled in large numbers in the district of Haripur N.W.F.P of Pakistan and in Dir. They are still good in numbers around Kabul and more than one hundred families in Gandghar. Also they are settled in Daccan Hyderabad of India Mashwanis are brave people with some great history. They have played a brave role against Sikhs and British with Pashtun tribes of the region like Swatis, Tareens, Shalmani, and Jadoons. People like Salim Shah Mashwani, who was martyred by Sikhs, are heroes of Pashtuns.

Their spoken language is Pashto and some of the famous Khels and susbsections are Lodin, Matkani, Roghani, Kazyooni, Ghareeb, Yousafkhel, Moosakhel, Adamkhel, Sakhar, Hasanhhel (Sindh), Azadkhel, Murjankhel, Bhatal, Amanikhel, Janikhel, Rahati and senkhel duarakhhel and also japani

Syed Umer Khetab of District Haripur Gallai has researched for the last 30-35 years how the Moshwani came to Afghanistan, Pakistan and India.

Sirikot at the edge of Islamabad and Punjab but actually serikot is situated in hazara division district haripur. In hazara the main district are mansehra, abbottabad, haripur, kohistan etc. in all these district most of the people speek HINDKO. The MASHWANI living in hazara but we can proudly say that we are pathan and all mashwani who are living in haripur are 100% pushto speeking .Serikot is in tehsil ghazi but another most populated area of mashwani's is goodvalley 14 km from haripur and 15 km from Punjab (hassanabdal).Goodvalley behind the serikot and in the bottom of high hills of serikot toward haripur. other important areas of mashwani's are basu mera, bugnian and baka. Other then haripur mashwani are living in the quetta also .

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:22 PM
Mohamedzai

The Mohammadzai are a Pashtun tribe centered around Qandahar, Afghanistan. Many Mohammadzais can also be found in Afghanistan near Kabul And also Charsadda Pakistan. The tribe that took the throne from the Sadozais after they lost control of the government were the Mohammadzais, both of whom are part of the larger Abdali (Durrani) tribe. The Mohammadzai tribe is one of the most politically active tribes among the Pashtuns. People from this tribe usually have the southern dialect of Pushto and take pride in their Pashtun inhertence. Mohammadzais who live in the vicinity of Kabul, speak Dari rather than their native Pashto. Mohammadzais have been known to be one of the most educated tribes in Pushtun society. The current living king of Afghanistan Mohammad Zahir Shah is also a member of the Mohammadzai tribe. The tribe which lost power from the afghan communist government was the Mohammadzai. All of the Kings and presidents before the Communist Regime all the way up to Payinda Khan was Mohammadzai from Barakzai Lineage. Most Mohammadzais are Landowners, very successful businessmen, and political or philosophical thinkers. During the reign of Amir Abdur Rahman Khan Most Mohammadzais were sent to Northern Afghanistan for more tribal influence on the Uzbek, Tajik, and hazara clans. Therefor creating a more broad based support for his self and his tribe. You can locate Mohammadzai tribes in Herat, Kundoz, Takhar, Rostak, Maimana, Faryab, Mazar I Sharif, Faryab, Baghlan and other area's of Afghanistan.

Here is an example of some Barakzai/Mohammadzai leaders:


List of Mohamedzai Leaders

Leaders of Afghanistan
Emir Abdur Rahman Khan (October 1879/July 22, 1880-October 3, 1901)
King Habibullah Khan (October 3, 1901 - February 20, 1919)
King Amanullah Khan (February 28, 1919 - January 14, 1929)
Queen Soraya Tarzi (w. of King Amanullah Khan) (November 29, 1899 - April 20, 1968)
King Inayatullah Khan (January 14, 1929 - January 17, 1929)
King Mohammed Nadir Shah (October 17, 1929 - November 8, 1933)
King Mohammed Zahir Shah (November 8, 1933 - July 17, 1973)
President Daud Khan (July 18, 1909 - April 28, 1978)

Other Prominent Leaders

Mahmud Tarzi - Poet, Author, Ambassador, Minister of Foreign Affairs
Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan - Afghan thinker, Leader in the anti-British movement in India's Northwest Frontier, Advisor of Gandhi


Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan

(Pashto/Arabic: خان عبد الغفار خان) (b. at Hashtnagar in Utmanzai, Peshawar, North-West Frontier Province, India, c. 1890; d. in Peshawar, NWFP, Pakistan, 20 January 1988) was a Pashtun (Afghan) political and spiritual leader known for his non-violent opposition to British Rule during the final years of the Imperial rule in the Indian sub-continent. He was a lifelong pacifist and a devout Muslim. He was known as Badshah Khan (sometimes written as Bacha Khan), the King of Chiefs, and Frontier Gandhi.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:23 PM
Mohmand

is one of the strongest Pashtun tribes, living in Afghanistan and western North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan. Abdul Ahad Mohmand who spent nine days aboard the MIR space station in 1988, becoming the first Afghan Pashtun cosmonaut in space is also one of known mohmand . Mohmands still live under "strict" medieval tribal laws, and follow the customary feudal "code of honour", Pashtunwali. Like all Pashtun tribes, they are extremely primitive and backward, living a wild and violent life in mountain wastelands, with material standards a little better than that of the [[stone age].though there is some sects that rely on crime to earn a living - indulging in smuggling, banditry, kidnapping, gun running, narcotics production, car theft, counterfeiting and forging. Their "legal" jobs consist mainly business,industrail and goverment officials and also daily wage labour in the urban areas. They pay no taxes at all, and insist on the use of free electricity. Literacy and education are extremely low, but healthy shift is taking place toward education now . Pakistan and Afghanistan are both unruly and lawless societies to begin with, but even their regular laws don't apply in their autonomous Pashtun tribal territories. For this reason, the Pashtun tribal areas also welcome and give refuge and protection to all kinds of fugitives and outlaws from "settled" (i.e. regularly policed) districts. Although the Mohmands and other Pashtun tribesmen belong basically to the ancient pastoral cultural way of life, their continuous petty clan rivalries, blood feuds and and tribal clashes involve the use of the most sophisticated heavy artillery, mines and rockets - most of which have come to them from the Afghan civil war and jihad - and which they use without compunction. Since they look down upon modern official state and civil laws, their disputes are decided by the informal, customary jirga gatherings, which closely resemble an amerindian pow wow. It is a gathering in which a large number of rough, mostly illiterate tribal elders sit on a circle on the ground chewing snuff and drinking tea - and can decide any thing which may seem right to them. Also anothter term is practised called "bramtha" which includes keeping some one captive if the person ows him money or any other obligation which he hasnt fulfilled untill the demands are satisfied and captive is released to go.

In Pakistan the Mohmand Agency (the term "tribal agency" denotes a special tribal district, approximating a tribal reservation in Pakistani nomenclature) is an abode for Mohmands, further migrations from Afghanistan and Mohmand Agency have occurred and continue down to the plains of Peshawar, Charsadda, and Mardan. Also mohmands are scaterd through out pakistan in urban areas like karachi,Lahore,Quetta e.t.c.

Sub clans in Mohmands are. Tarakzai, Baizai, Halimzai, Khuwazai, Dawezai, Atman Khel, Bazid Khel, Kuda Khel. Kasam khel.

The mohmand are divided into three main clans
Tarakzai,
Baezai,
Khwaezai.


The Tarakzai are again divided into:


Tarakzai proper.
Halimzai.
Momand of Ghazni Musa khel.-----Esa Khel-----Tarakzai-----Dado khel-----Mansur khel-----Masum khel
Burhan khel.

And then there are the afilliated clans:

Dawaezai.
Utmanzai.
Kukuzai.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:27 PM
Niazi

(Pashto: نیازی ) is a famous Pashtun tribe with a rich history and culture. The family head of Niazi tribe was known as Ibrahim. The word Niazi is basically derived from the word Niazai like the other forms of Pashtun tribes, for example Kakayzai and Baburzai. The Moghul emperor Babur wrote in his book about the Niazi tribe being settled in the Mianwali near the Indus river, so this confirms that the Niazi tribes started settling in the Mianwali district before Mughul rule. Niazi people currently live mainly in the Mianwali, Khanewal, Multan, Muzzaffargarh districts and Bhakkar districts of Punjab (Pakistan), Bannu and Kohat (togh sarai) districts of North-West Frontier Province and as well as in parts of Afghanistan. Some Niazis have also settled in Karachi and other cities such as Lahore. Niazi's can also be found in parts of Afghanistan and in Turkey.

Most Niazis speak the Mianwali form of Seraiki dialect which is influenced by Pashto, while the rest speak Pashto. Niazis strictly observe Pashtunwali, the Pashtun code of honor. The Niazi tribe is an influential player in the politics of Pakistan especially Punjab. The Niazi tribe is divided into various sub-tribes and most Niazi's have settled in Mianwali which has three tehsils: Mianwali, Isa Khel and Piplan. The major sub-tribes of Niazis are Watta Khel, Balo Khel, Esa Khel, Punnu Khel , Pai Khel and Musa Khel.Each major sub-tribe has many minor sub tribes named after the famous personalities and elders of the tribe. Each subtribe is considered as a specialist in its own field and are seen with the same respect. The original dialect of Niazis is supposed to be Pashto but as time has passed in Mianwali (as the major Niazis live in Mianwali district) their mother tongue and skin colour have been changed according to the environment of the Indus valley.



Noorzai

or Nurzai are one of the major tribes of the Pashtun. Although it is not really proven which two branches (Durrani or Ghilzais) of Pashtuns they are related to, most of them believe they are descendants of the Durrani as they have been living in Afghanistan for hundreds of years. The Noorzai live in places such as Kandahar, Kabul, Farah, Helmand, Herat, Nimroz, and some parts of Pakistan.These tribes are greatly akcnowledged in Afghan society.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:28 PM
Orakzai

Orakzai is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan.it consists of eighteen subsects.Most of the members are situated in the northwestern frontier of pakistan. The Orakzai are a Pathan tribe on the Kohat border of the NorthWest Frontier Province of India. The Orakzais inhabit the mountains to the north-west of Kohat district, bounded on the N. and E. by the Afridis, on the S. by the Miranzai valley and on the W. by the Zaimukht country and the Safed Koh mountains. Their name means "lost tribes," and their origin is buried in obscurity; though they resemble the Afghans in language, features and many of their customs, they are rejected by them as brethren. One branch, the Ali Khel, has been traced to Swat, whence they were expelled by the other inhabitants and it is not improbable that the whole tribe consists of refugee clans of the surrounding races. They are very wiry-looking mountaineers, they are fine men and brave fighters just as their neighbours the Afridis. They cultivate a good deal of the Khanki and Kurmana valleys in the winter, but in the hot months retire to the heights of Tirah, of which they occupy the southern half called the Mastura valley. They have been estimated at 28,000 fighting men, but this estimate must be largely exaggerated, as the country could not possibly support the consequent population of over 100,000. They have been the object of various British military expeditions, notably in 1855, 1868, 1869, 1891, and the Tirah campaign of 1897.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:38 PM
Popalzai

or Popalzay is the name of the Pashtun clan that is part of the larger Durrani tribe from which the first king of Afghanistan Ahmad Shah Durrani originated. The current President of Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai, is also a Popalzai.






Rohilla

For the eponymous steamship, see Rohilla (steamship)
Rohillas (Urdu: روہِلا, Hindi: रोहिला) are Muslim highlanders (Roh means mountains and Rohilla literally means mountaineer) of Pashtun origin. Roh corresponded to the mountainous region stretching from Swat and Bajaur in north to Sibi and Bhakkar in south and Hasan Abdal in east to the Kabul and Kandahar in west. The Rohillas currently reside in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh.



Origin
Most Rohillas belonged to Yousafzai tribe of Pathans, mainly of Mandanr sub-section. The term Rohilla was used for all Pathans, except for the Bangashes who settled in the Rohilkhand region, or men serving under Rohilla chiefs . They were awarded the Katehr region in northern India by Mughal emperor Aurangzeb Alamgir (ruled 1658-1707) to suppress Rajput uprisings. However most of them settled in the Katehar region during Nadir Shah's invasion of northern India in 1739 increasing their population up to 100,000. Due to the large settlement of Rohilla Afghans, the Katehar region gained fame as Rohilkhand. Bareilly was made the capital of the Rohilkhand state. Other important cities were Moradabad, Rampur, Shahjahanpur, Badaun, and others. This region is nowadays located in modern Uttar Pradesh state of India.

Rohillas were distinguished from local peoples by their fair complextion, tall stature, muscular physique and by their separate language and culture. They spoke Pashto among each other but gradually lost their language over time. Nowadays most of them are living in the region between Rampur and Bareilly and speak the Urdu language.

Some Rohillas are descendants of Hindu Rajputs who ruled Rohilkhand from 1702-1720. Bareilly was the capital (1707-20) of the Hindu Rohilla kingdom. The region is named for the Rohilla tribe, and was known as Madhyadesh in the Hindu epic Mahabharata. Dr. K. C. Sen has written a book on the history of Rohilla Rajputs. The book is available for view and download at: http://rajputrohilla.googlepages.com.


History
The founders of the Pathan state of Rohilkhand were Daud Khan and his adopted son Ali Mohammed Khan. Daud Khan arrived in 1705 in India along with a band of his tribe. He was succeeded in 1721 by Ali Mohammed Khan, who became so powerful that he refused to send tax revenues to the central governament. Safdar Jang, the Nawab[1] of Oudh, warned Mughal emperor Mohammed Shah[2] of the growing power of the Rohillas. This caused Mohammed Shah to sent an expedition against him as a result of which he surrendered to imperial forces. He was taken to Delhi as a prisoner, but was later pardoned and appointed governor of Sirhind. In 1748, he returned to Rohilkhand and recovered his lost possessions. Later that year Ali Mohammed Ali Khan died, leaving six sons. However, two of his elder sons were in Afghanistan at the time of his death while the other four were too young to assume the leadership of Rohilkhand. As a result, power transferred to other Rohilla Sardars, the most important being Hafiz Rahmat Khan and Dundi Khan.


Following the Battle of Panipat in 1761
In the third battle of Panipat (1761) one of the Rohilla Sardars, Najib-ul-Daula, allied himself with Ahmad Shah Abdali[3] against the Marathas. He not only provided 40,000 Rohilla troops but also 70 guns to combined forces. He also convinced the Nawab Shuja-ul-Daula of Oudh to join Ahmad Shah Abdali's forces against the Marathas. In this battle, the Maratha's were defeated and as a consequence Rohilla increased in power.

Rohilkhand was invaded by the Marathas to retaliate against Rohillas paticipation in the Panipat War against Marathas. The Marathas entered the jagir (land) of late Sardar Najib-ud-Daula which was now held by his son Zabita Khan. Zabita Khan gave tough resistancs but was defeated and forced to flee to the camp of Shuja-ud-Daula and his country was ravaged by Marathas. The principal remaining Rohilla Sardar was Hafiz Rahmat Khan and through him an agreement was formed with Nawab of Oudh Shuja-ud-Daula by which they had to pay 4 million rupees in return to their military help in defeating Marathas. However, after the defeat of the Marathas, the Rohillas refused to pay. The Wazir (minister) then decided to annex the country of Rohilkhand but he was unable to fight the Rohillas alone. Therefore he sought assistance from Warren Hastings of the British East India Company (the company had been trading in India since 1600), promising 4 million rupees in return for their military aid.

The joined forces of British and Oudh invaded Rohilkhand. Rohillas fought fiercely but when their leader Hafiz Rahmat Khan was killed, they faced defeat in April 1774. the whole Rohilkhand was plundered and hundreds of thousands of Rohillas flee to jungles across Ganges to save their lives. Later Rohilla began a guerilla war against British occupation. In response, the Rohillas were hunted down and slaughtered by the British and were subsequently scattered in the countryside and settled in many small towns. Later charges of destroying a nation (ethnic cleansing or genocide) were brought against Hastings by Edmund Burke and Thomas Babington Macaulay. Later, the British transferred Rohilkhand to the British Empire in 1774. The Rohillas took an active part in War of Independence in 1857 against British imperial forces (referred to as the Mutiny by the British historians, or the War of Independence). The revolt was bitterly suppressed, and in its wake the British dramatically reorganized the government of South Asia, bringing an end to the British East India Company's regime and leading to almost a century of direct rule of the South Asia by Britain under the British Raj.


Other Rohilla Notables

Nawab Amir Khan of Tonk
Nawab Faizullah Khan
General Bakht Khan
Mohammed Ali Jauhar
Maulana Shaukat Ali
Sahabzada Yaqub Khan



Salarzai,

along with the Kakazai and Wur, are one of the four clans of Tarkanis. There are around 8,000 members in the Babukarrah and Charmung valleys in Bajaur and 150 members in Bara Banda of District Nowshera in Pakistan.

The Khans of Pashat and Khar have some control over the tribe.



Swati

This is about the tribe in Pakistan. For the unrelated African language, see Swati language.

The Swati are a famous Pashtun tribe, dwelling in the districts of Batagram and Mansehra of the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan, a mountainous area that contains such historical places as Pakhli, Agror, Thakot, Balakot, Kaghan, Black Mountain of Hazara and Allai and in sizable number in upper Dir and Sama(lower) Swat. Swatis also ruled Kashmir from 14th-16th century A.D. The first ever muslim ruler of Kashmir was Shah Mir Baba a Swati, by whom Islam became major religion of Kashmir.


History and origin of the name
The term "Swati" refers to Pashtun tribes which occupied the area of Swat before the arrival of the Yusafzai.

The Swati moved from Swat to fight the Sikhs in Sikh-ruled areas of present-day Pakistan. According to some authorities, when the King of Kabul, Mirza Ulagh beg pushed Yousafzais from Kabul, they took refuge in Swat, Bajawar and Peshawar of Swatis and Dilazaks country, due to conspiracies of Mughals, the tribes fought an intense guerilla war against each other for more than two decades, culminating in the withdrawal of the Swatis from their lands, and had been migrated to east into the land of Hazara Division, where they perdominated. King Babar himself took part in conquering their strongholds.

The late Pashto poet and philosopher Abdul Ghani Khan shares that opinion. He considers the Pashtuns a mixture of various races that came through their territories from Central Asia. Suddum (mardan), Khyber (Peshawar) and Elum (Swat) have place names resembling those of bani Israel, and Mir Afzal Khan Jadoon asserted that the features and habits of the Pashtuns resemble those of the Jews. Apart from the clans of Karlanr and Mati, Swati, Tanolis and Jadoons have similar dwellings and clothes resembling those of Jews of the past.

A Thirteenth-century book, Tabakat-e-Nasiri, by Minhajuddin Josjani mentions the fort of Gabar in the reign of Mahmood Ghaznavi, later on we founded the names of Gabri/Jahangiri Sultans of Swat amongst Swatis of Bajuar and Swat in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth centuries.

The name Swat cannot be found in ancient history. Early peoples called the area by various other names. For example, some 3,000 years ago, it was called Udhyana ("Garden"). In the writings of Chinese travelers, the name Soto is mentioned (the name which comes closest to Swat), while in Greek accounts the name Asoconoi is given. Mahmood Ghaznavi called it Qerat.

Others believe the name is of Arabic origin. Some authorities say the word Swat is derived from Aswad ("black") because the hills and mountains of the area are covered with thick forests, which appear black.

Still another account relates that when Mahmood Ghaznavi conquered the land, he wanted to settle some of his people to keep control of it, so he settled two tribes, the Swati and Dalazak, in the territory. As the Swati tribe was larger, the area took its name from that group.

Batagram was a tribal area until 1958, when the people of that district themselves wished to be a part of Pakistan. Authors also mention them, in the times of Mohammad of Ghor they came to conquered Swat from Afghanistan, as the frontline soldiers and Chiefs of the Army. Other historians say Swatis were great Assakenois and It's subsection Aspasios as Yousafzais, who fought great wars against Alexander the Great in 326-27 BC.

Swati is one of the largest land-owning tribes of Pashtun in the Northwest Frontier Province. The population is widely spread from Mansehra, Balakot, Kaghan and Batagram all the way to the eastern slopes of the Black Mountain of Hazara and the mountains of Allai. Politically and economically, they have very strong hold in the region.

Swatis have ruled Swat, Malakand, Dir and other regions for more than 300 years. They also ruled Kashmir from 1339 to 1561. They took Pakhli ( Hazara Division ) from the Turks in 1703 under the leadership of Syed Jalal Baba.Turks ruled Hazara for more than two and half centuries and their rule came to an end when Syed Jala Baba invited Sawatis to attack Mansehra.He was son in law of last Turk ruler of Hazara.The last Turk ruler of Pakhal Sarkar(the name of Sarkar of Turks in Hazara)was Sultan Mehmud Khurd.

Sa'adat Khan Swati was the first ruler of Pakhlai (1762-1780), during the reign of Durranis. One of his ruler sons, Najeebullah Khan Swati, was martyred in the famous War of Mangal against the Sikhs.

According to some authors, the Swatis are descended from Bitan of Ghilzai, one of the sons of Pashtun, a mythical and whimsical ancestor of the Pashtun people. Another account claims they originated in the Ranizai section of the Yousafzai.

Some well-known khels and subsections of the Swatis are Jahangiri, Malkals, Deeshan, Akhun Khel, Beror, Jadoor, Najabat Khel, Khan Khel, Kuchelai, Madda Khel, Musa Khel, Narors, Tirimzai, Samkori, Sana Khel, Sumla Khel, Warozai, Khazan khel, Sherkhani, Gabarzai or Gabri, Barkhan khel or Barkhani and Ghoris. Pashto is spoken in the whole region among them. Three other Pashtun tribes of the Hazara division are the Jadoons, Tareens, and Mashwanis.




Shilmani

Shilmani or Shalmani is a Pashtun tribe living in Shalman valley in Khyber agency near Peshawar, NWFP, Pakistan.

Shalmani live not only in Shalman valley in Khyber agency, but are also present in numbers in different areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan. In Pakistan, they live in Swat, Dir, Bajour, Bunir, Shangla, Haripur, Malakand agency, Dargai, Sakha Koat, Charsadda, and Umarzai (Hasht Nagar). Shalmani tribes live all over Afghanistan. They were originally brought to Swat by one of the famous Pakhtun conquerors and kings, Shahabuddin Mohammad Ghouri, from Shalman and Karman Afghanistan. But it is to be noted that the present Shalman valley in Pakistan




Shinwari

The Shinwari are an ethnic tribe in Afghanistan.

Shinwari translates into the English language as Simon.

The Shinwari tribe is also found in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas controlled by Pakistan, though there is no longer any true political connection between the Shinwaris of the respective countries.

Among the greatest poets of the Pashto language in the 20th century was the late Ameer Hamza Shinwari, also known as "Hamza Baba" and "Father of the Ghazal".


Shirani

Sherani or Shirani is a Pathan tribe of Pashtun origin, living predominantly in modern Pakistan and Afghanistan.

During early 20th century, the tribal group, also called as "Sheranis", is recorded as living on the Dera Ismail Khan border of the North-west Frontier Province of India during the British Raj, and was a part of "The Sherani Agency". The agency occupied an area of 1500 mile² and had a population of 12,371 according to 1901 census. The Sheranis occupied the principal portion of the mountain known as the Takht-i-Suliman and the country thence eastward down to the border of Dera Ismail Khan district. They were bounded on the north by the Gomal Pass, and beyond that by the Mahsud Waziris; on the south by the Ustaranas and Zmarais; and on the west by the Haripals, Kakars and Mandu Khels.




Suri [/B

The Suri are a Pashtun tribe. One theory about them is that the Suri Pakhtun were people brought from Syria by the son of Seljuks prince. The Suris and Nuhanis are descended from Ismail's (the son of Ibrahim Lodhi) two sons Sur and Nuh.



[B]Tanoli

The Tanolies (also spelt Tanauli, Tanawali) are a prominent and famous Muslim Pakhtun tribe residing mainly in the Amb, Hazara district of NWFP Pakistan. They have ruled the state of Amb of Hazara whitch started from the beginning of 18th century.During the the late 17th century,Turks were overthrown by swatis in areas of upper Hazara. Tanolis, however, remained loyel to Turks till end of latters rule in Hazara.Tanolis later on put up the vigorous rebellions against the Sikhs in the 19th century. They also allied with Ahmed Shah Abdali in his conquest of India. Many Khans and princes of their dynasty have gained mass popularity as heroes. The origin of the term Tanoli is due to later corruption of the name Tanawali[citation needed]. It is a Hazara custom to change names etc. from the original. For example in Tanawal the name Gohar Aman is usually pronounced as Gohriamaan, Hussain khan to Sain khan, Ahmed khan to madd khan and Mubarak Shah to Marak Shah - there are countless examples of this in different parts of Hazara - this is the most plausible explanation for the term as the oral and written history of Tanawal is fiercely holding on to their age-long belief that they originate from Afghanistan from a pass known Tanaubal or Tanawal [citation needed]. Therefore, to assign any other origin of the name Tanoli is not only against the cultural norms and tribal history of the area but also a distortion of History.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:45 PM
Tarkani


The Tarkani (or Tarkalanri) are a Pashtun tribe located in Bajaur in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan that number roughly 36,000 people.




Tareen
Tareen (Pashto: ترین) is a prominent Pashtun tribe residing in Pakistan and Afghanistan.



Tareen History
Tareenis the pashtu tribe its an important tribe of pashtun most of them they are in kandahar khushaab near kandahar airport They played a very important role in Sultan Muhammad Ghori's army and showed great bravery. The Tareen tribes of Hazara Division migrated from Kandahar in the 17th century CE under the leadership of Sher Khan Tareen.

Ahmed Shah Abdali on his conquest of India deputed powerful tribal chiefs with conquered areas. In Hazara region, amongst these deputed chiefs were Najeebullah Khan Tareen, Sa'adat Khan Swati of Garhi Habibullah, Mir Zabardast Khan Tanoli (also known as Suba Khan Tanoli), and some others. Tareens have some history with other Pashtun tribes of Hazara Division, uniting against Sikhs in the Sikh reign. People like Muhammad Khan Tareen and Bostan Khan Tareen are heroes for their staunch resistance against the Sikh empire, now reverred as heroes of Hazara history.


Tareen Residence
[The base of Tareen tribe is in Pishin near Quetta in Baluchistan province of Pakistan. This area was formerly a part of Afghanistan but was ceded to the British after the Second Afghan War. Some families migrated to [Haripur]] in Hazara in the present North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. Tareens are also settled in Quetta,Pishin, Harnai, Dukki (Only the Spin Tareen branch of the tribe), and Gulistan districts in Balochistan and Hazara, North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. They are also present in sizeable proportions in the areas near Kandahar in Afghanistan. A provincial capital in central Afghanistan is also named "Tareen Kot" (Meaning castle of the Tareens). The Tareens have a sizeable presence in Multan since the times of Ahmad Shah Durrani. They are also settled in Sind (Where they only use the Last name as "Khan") and in India in Bhopal and even Banglore. One Abdul Karim Khan Tareen migrated from Multan to Istanbul (Then capital of erstwhile Ottoman Turkey) in mid-nineteenth century and his descendents are living in Turkey but they do not use the Sirname "Tareen", instead they use the name "Bey". Detailed History of Tareens is available in Sir Olaf Caroe's book "The Pathans", Dewan Hakam Chand (Extra Assisatnt Commissioner)'s book "Tawareekh Multan" (Histories of Multan) Published 1878 AD (One volume available in the Multan Public Library, Bagh Langhe Khan, Multan), and the "Imperial Gazetteer of Quetta and Pishin Districts" (Published in late nineteeth century by the Government of Baluchistan at Peshawar).


Subsections and Branches of The Tareen Tribe
The famous khels and subsections of the Tareen tribe are Taur, Speen, Abdaal the most important tribe of tareenz are Ibrahimzai,Most of ibrahim zai are in us near new york and ibrahim zais are from kandahar new kandahar air port khushaab, Taranzai, Mangalzai, Bedalzai and Ferozzai. Mashwanis, Swatis, and Jadoons are the closest Pashtun tribes to Tareen in the region of Hazara division, and in Multan too. they are also living in the district pishin,Mastung, Gulistan, and in Chawtair (district Ziarat).

Jahangir Khan Tareen became Pakistan's Federal Minister for Industries, Production and Special Initiatives in 2004.

Tareens also reside in Multan Pakistan and are well established in the community with many notable citizens including Gul Mohammed Khan Tareen founder of Gultex textile products. Tareens of Multan are mostly landlords, like Abdur Rehmaan Khan Tareen, whose son Tanzeef Khan Tareen holds a prestigious post of a senior civil servant in Dubai. Other notables include Prof. Faizullah Khan Tareen, who is a renowned personality of the region.

Several family's of Tareen's migrated to North America in 1970's and 1980's and are mostly involved in business and technical fields.


Languages
Principal language of Tareens is Pashto while formerly Persian was used as the language for records and correspondence. Tombstones upto late nineteenth century are in Persian. Those who have setteld away from Pishin speak local languages, such as Multani or Sraiki in Multan, Hindko in Hazara, Urdu in Bhopal and Sindhi in Sind.



Umarzai
Umarzai (or Omarzai) is a relatively small Pathan family group found in urban areas in Pakistan. A large group used to live in Jaranwala, Pakistan and Nakuru, Kenya but now most have them have moved to the United Kingdom. A few of them still live in Jaranwala, but all the members from Nakuru have left.



Ustarana
Ustarana is a Pashtoon tribe who were originally inhabitants of Dera Ismail Khan region of North West Frontier Province, Pakistan. Ustaranas were wandering people who undertook mainly pastoral and trading activities, but gradually also settled into agriculture.the origin of ustarana tribes is dera ismail khan and dukki baluchistan.the main sub casta of uatarana tribes are hassan zai,khan zai ,shabay zai,ismail zai,ahmed zai,khawaja khail,toor khail,akhozai,kara zai,etc



Utman Khel

The Utman Khel are a Pakhtun tribe who occupy the hills to the north of Peshawar in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan. Their land lies between the Mohmands and the Ranizais of Swat, to the west and south-west of the junction of the Swat and Panjkora rivers. They claim to be descendants of Baba Utman, who accompanied Mahmud of Ghazni in his expedition into India in 997. The Utman Khel are a tall, stout and fair race, but their dress and general customs have been assimilated by the neighboring peoples of Bajour. Their land is very hilly and difficult, but well cultivated in terraces. They number some 40,000, and their fighting strength is about 8000 men. The British conducted military campaigns against them in 1852, 1878, and 1898.



Wur
The Wur (also known as Wara), along with the Kakazai and Salarzai, are a division of the Tarkani Pashtun tribe. There are about 3,000 of them living principally in the Watelai valley in Bajaur.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:50 PM
Yusufzai, Yusofzai, Yousafzai, Esapzey, or Yusufi

The Yusufzai (also Yousafzai, Esapzey, or Yusufi) (Urdu: یوسف زئی) are one of the largest Pashtun tribe. The majority of the Yusufzai tribe reside in the North West Frontier Province and Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan, with some tribal Yususfzais settled along the Afghan border. Yusufzais are the predominant population in the districts of Swat, Mardan, Malakand and Swabi. They speak the northern variant of "Pukhtu" with the hard "kh" replacing the softer "sh" of southern Pashtun tribes. Their manner of speaking Pashto is universally recognised as being the purest among all Pashtun tribes.

History

In their migration eastward, arrived at Kabul when Mirza Ulugh Beg was governor. He succeeded his father, Shah Rukh, who was a son of Timur (Taimur-e-Lang), in 1446 A.D. In the time of Babur, who first came to Kabul in 1504 A.D. the whole of the Peshawar district had already been colonized by different Afghan tribes; and, on his second visit, fourteen years later, he found the Yusufzais had spread well into Swat. The settlement of the Yusufzais in their present limits, on these data, must, therefore, have been and subsequent to the dates above-mentioned.

An account of the Yusufzai migration from Kandahar, their wanderings, and final settlement in their present limits, is their take over on the lands from the Dilazaks, whom, without much difficulty, they drove across the Indus to the Hazara mountains (now known as the Hazara District where lies the beautiful city of Abbottabad), after a single but desperate and decisive battle fought on the plains between the villages of Gadar and Langarkot.


After settling themselves firmly in the plains, the Yusufzais pushed on into the hill country beyond and in a few years became the masters of Swat and Buner. Three sections of the tribe, the Hassanzai, Akazai and Chagharzai, inhabit the west slopes of the Black Mountain, and the Yusufzai country stretches thence to the Utman Khel territory. The Kamalzai Yusufzais inhabit Hoti of Mardan District. The population demographics of entire Yusufzais (of all linguistic groups but have Yusufzai blood line) is unknown but the Pashtu speaking Yusufzais are from 3-6 million in numbers.


Theories of Origin
The Yusufzais are said to be descended from one Mandai, who had two sons, Umar and Yusuf. Umar died, leaving one son, Mandan; from Mandan and Yusuf come the two primary divisions of the Yusufzais, which are split into numerous subdivisions, including the Isazai, Malizai, Akazai, Ranizai and Utmanzai. There also have been some theories that they are descended from the lost tribes of Bani Israel.


Sub-Tribes
Akazai
Chagharzai
Hassanzai
Isazai
Kamalzai
Malizai
Ranizai
Utmanzai

Indian Yusufzais
During the Mughal rule, thousands of Yusufzais migrated to present day India with Mughal and Lodhi dynasties. Some of these families went on to become the ruling Nawab families, such as the Nawab of Rampur's clan who are Yousefzais. The Yousefzais of India settled permenantly in many parts of India, such as Bhopal, Rampur, Tonk, Bareilly and Baroda. The Rohillas were members of Yusufzai tribe. After independence of India in 1947, many of them migrated to Pakistan and settled mainly in Karachi. Their centuries of stay in India has changed their native language from Pashtu to pure Urdu. Now almost none of them can even understand the Pashtu language. They have played a very important role in the promotion of Urdu language.

Malaysian Yusofzai : Farhad:tongue:

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:51 PM
Zazai

The Zazi (also spelled Zazai and Dzadzi, pronounced Dza-dzai) are a Pashtun tribe. They live in the Paktia and Khost provinces of Afghanistan.

Farhad
01-27-2007, 04:53 PM
what happen to mamadzai..?

Do you meant to say Mohammadzai ?

Algazel
01-28-2007, 06:38 AM
Salam,

I was looking for such a thing, but it is really too long.

If there were any chart, I think it would have been much better. Bcz like this, it is really difficult to keep in mind which subtribe goes to which clan, or etc.

Thnx

Farhad
01-28-2007, 09:26 AM
Salam,

I was looking for such a thing, but it is really too long.

If there were any chart, I think it would have been much better. Bcz like this, it is really difficult to keep in mind which subtribe goes to which clan, or etc.

Thnx

Insha'allah I will find it and put it together for you soon..:yes:

Pashto Dreamer
01-29-2007, 08:37 AM
Wow good on u Farhad! Yeah Im a khattak. We call the khattak dance shardolah sorry about the spelling) like other tribes we r split up into many clans called khels. nice research bro!

Farhad
03-02-2007, 07:29 PM
Wow good on u Farhad! Yeah Im a khattak. We call the khattak dance shardolah sorry about the spelling) like other tribes we r split up into many clans called khels. nice research bro!

I have see the Khattak'd Dance..it was great :thumbup1:

Sadaf
03-03-2007, 03:56 AM
these all trib are in sol and heart , ( for afghan) are ( paraday ) , they love to be with Pakistani . , but in Afghanistan these are not even like to call them self afghan .( they call them self pashtoon ) , also these are, love to even speak ( afghan pashto) with Pakistani Urdu accent , like jelal abti , and laghamani , and kamaie . love to be talk and sing and dress like peshowri , and Qandahari love to be like kowata wallah . and from other said we have a city to name of heart . who even control total economic of city of mashhad during war and even now , they never ever call them self Irani , or not even love to talk or use Irani word or accent in there conversation , a 25% test of long time ago now also they have in there language . but when you ask them ,are you from Iran . quickly they answer you , alhamdulellah I am from Afghanistan . but all our pashtoon like always have Pakistani ( shinakhte card ) and passport , and they never even thinks of Afghanistan , . from all this Pashtun tribal show me one who don a great job for Afghanistan .

I am sorry, but What? are u insulting or praising? ?

Pashto Dreamer
03-03-2007, 05:50 AM
I think hes insulting but u cant be sure coz his english is so bad!

Patata
03-20-2007, 09:40 AM
could you post more about popalzai?

Patata
03-20-2007, 09:42 AM
okay i just know
first i'm khodezai and khodezai are descent from Karizai and Karizai are descent from Popalzai hmmmmm

nightwalker
03-20-2007, 09:43 AM
There Is A New Tribe , Farhanzai :)

Patata
03-20-2007, 10:09 AM
no there is another country patatistan and the people of the country are patatazai

nightwalker
03-20-2007, 10:11 AM
u r reminding me of pitta :( im so hungryy

Saraa
03-20-2007, 10:12 AM
no there is another country patatistan and the people of the country are patatazai

lol your funny girl:thumbup1:

Patata
03-20-2007, 10:17 AM
u r reminding me of pitta :( im so hungryy

hey go eat , what can i do..........

Ghorzang
03-26-2007, 08:30 AM
farhad wrora i'm doing research on "LUDIN" .. i want to figure out how Ludin are related to Lodi.. i have a book "hayat-e-afghani".. in there it says we "Alozai" are from ghilzai tribe and children of sulaimankhel.. and lodi was the brother of ghilzai..

it mentions my smallest tribe which is Alozai but doesn't say anything about Ludin.. so if you have any info on ludin please share..

familygirl
06-13-2007, 08:05 PM
Dear Farhad,

Assalam Alakum.

I wanted to thank you for posting so much information on Afghan tribes. I have searched the internet quite a bit and haven't been very successful. I am trying to do a family tree but since all the elders of our family are overseas, I will have to wait a bit longer. Where did you gain so much knowledge about the tribes? Do you have any information on "Hamidzai", we are Achakzai but of the Hamidzai section. If you have any information it would be greatly appreciated, also if you know of any other websites. I am very excited and intrigued to find out as much as possible, this way it won't just be a family tree but a source of knowledge about our background. Thanks again.

Saira

Aab o Aatash
06-13-2007, 08:17 PM
Farhad,

please mention more tribes of the 'mashriqi' area i.e. the tribes in and around Ningarhar, Laghman and Kunar.

Farhad
06-14-2007, 12:53 PM
Dear Farhad,

Assalam Alakum.

I wanted to thank you for posting so much information on Afghan tribes. I have searched the internet quite a bit and haven't been very successful. I am trying to do a family tree but since all the elders of our family are overseas, I will have to wait a bit longer. Where did you gain so much knowledge about the tribes? Do you have any information on "Hamidzai", we are Achakzai but of the Hamidzai section. If you have any information it would be greatly appreciated, also if you know of any other websites. I am very excited and intrigued to find out as much as possible, this way it won't just be a family tree but a source of knowledge about our background. Thanks again.

Saira



Achakzai (Urdu: اچکزئی) is a Pashtun subtribe of Barakzai Clan. Mainly this tribe has three subtribes named as (Gujjan, Badin, & AliSher) then they are further divided in their own identities. There are various other subtribes within the 3 Sub clans of Achakzai clan like (Asheyzai, Malayzai, Adozai, Shamshozai, Sultanzai, Matakzai, Ishaqzai, Alizai, Shakarzai, Hamidzai, and Ghabizai ) mainly settled in Pakistan.

The village or hometown of the Achakzais is Qilla Abdullah in Balochistan and in the pashtun dominated areas of Afghanistan mainly in Kandahar Urzgan and Helmand provinces. Ghazi Abdullah Khan Achakzai Shaheed was one of the leaders of the Afghan War of Independence of 1839.

This war resulted in the destruction of a British Army that was 18000 strong. The lone survivor was a doctor who made it to the fort of Jalalabad. Esmat Muslim was an Achakzai of The Adozai subclan and was a renowned military leader of the Soviet backed regime in Afghanistan. His role in the conflict remains controversial though as he frequently changed sides between the Governemnt and the rebels. Major cities of the Achakzai are Chaman along the border of Afghanistan in Pakistan and Spin Boldak on the side of Afghanistan. Gulistan and Toba Achakzai also Ghazi Abdullah Khan and Quetta. The Achakzas have been very active in the Pashtun nationalist movement that demands, among other things, a separate province for the Pashtun ethnic group, a province that should include Quetta, Qilla Abdullah,
Mianwali and Pastun parts of Balochistan, NWFP, FATA and named as Pashtunistan.

Some famous Achakzai's are Mahmood Khan Achakzai (MNA & Chairman of Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party), and his father was another respectable politician, Shaheed Abdul Samad Khan Achakzai. Mulla Abdul Salam Asheyzai was another renouned nationalist poet of this tribe who wrote some famous books based on Islamic issues and Pashtun nationalism his famous books include (Talab-e-Mazhab and Sosan-e-Chamman). Historically Achakzais are brave intelligent and patriotic people. They have always fought for their land and have a good sense of discussion and critical thinking. Most of the achakzais are very good in negotiation and conflict resolution. In addition, achakzais are famous for their outspokeness.

ORBAL
06-15-2007, 09:36 AM
Farhad brother you’ve put a lot of information but you’ve made it all over the places which can be confusing for those who don’t know.

To make it simple, Pashtoon can be divided into two main groups. One is the Abdali or Hephthalites, as it’s traced by some historians, and the other is the Ghilzai. The term “zai”, or “zay” refers to “zoi” = son. So in this sense Ahmadzai was the son of Ahmad, a sub tribe of Ghilzai.

There is a chart for both Ghilzai and Abdali but I cannot find it right now. However, I have a chart of Ahmad Shah’s family tree which also includes some other sub tribes.

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/3734/abdali1es8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

reyes
06-16-2007, 12:28 PM
Worbal.. where can i find which tribes come under 'Hephthalites' or 'Abdali'? (in english)

Thanks for the information so far

ORBAL
06-16-2007, 03:20 PM
Worbal.. where can i find which tribes come under 'Hephthalites' or 'Abdali'? (in english)

Thanks for the information so far

Reyes, you can try and get hold of these books, if you can:
1. Pashtun Tribes and Their Family Trees - By - Mohammad Masoom Hotak
2. “Pukhtana” by Habibullah Tagai

You can also search for a specific query in:
http://www.khyber.org/pashtotribes.shtml

My source is different from the above and if I find it I will scan and post it later. It’s only good to trace your family linage but as a Pashtun one must always remember the famous stanza of Ahmad Shah:

Ka Ghilzi ka Abdali de dwara yaw de --- sha hagha che ye da zra shesha safa wa
[If they’re Ghilzi or Abdali they are both one- - The best among them is one whose heart is crystal clear.]

He always saw Pashtun as one!

Farhad
06-16-2007, 03:25 PM
Farhad brother you’ve put a lot of information but you’ve made it all over the places which can be confusing for those who don’t know.

To make it simple, Pashtoon can be divided into two main groups. One is the Abdali or Hephthalites, as it’s traced by some historians, and the other is the Ghilzai. The term “zai”, or “zay” refers to “zoi” = son. So in this sense Ahmadzai was the son of Ahmad, a sub tribe of Ghilzai.

There is a chart for both Ghilzai and Abdali but I cannot find it right now. However, I have a chart of Ahmad Shah’s family tree which also includes some other sub tribes.

http://img468.imageshack.us/img468/3734/abdali1es8.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Worbal Khana..I wish I could read in Pashto but sadly I can't....Could you do me a Favour by translating it into English...I thank you..:)

Farhad
06-16-2007, 03:29 PM
Reyes, you can try and get hold of these books, if you can:
1. Pashtun Tribes and Their Family Trees - By - Mohammad Masoom Hotak
2. “Pukhtana” by Habibullah Tagai

You can also search for a specific query in:
http://www.khyber.org/pashtotribes.shtml

My source is different from the above and if I find it I will scan and post it later. It’s only good to trace your family linage but as a Pashtun one must always remember the famous stanza of Ahmad Shah:

Ka Ghilzi ka Abdali de dwara yaw de --- sha hagha che ye da zra shesha safa wa
[If they’re Ghilzi or Abdali they are both one- - The best among them is one whose heart is crystal clear.]

He always saw Pashtun as one!

I always dreamed about uniting every Afghan Tribes as One Single and United Nation...All the way from Amu to Abaseen...From Indian Ocean to the Hindukush, from Border of Iran to the Border Of Kashmir.....One United Afghanistan Our Homeland , Our Motherland, Our Fatherland.

reyes
06-16-2007, 04:02 PM
Reyes, you can try and get hold of these books, if you can:
1. Pashtun Tribes and Their Family Trees - By - Mohammad Masoom Hotak
2. “Pukhtana” by Habibullah Tagai

You can also search for a specific query in:
http://www.khyber.org/pashtotribes.shtml

My source is different from the above and if I find it I will scan and post it later. It’s only good to trace your family linage but as a Pashtun one must always remember the famous stanza of Ahmad Shah:

Ka Ghilzi ka Abdali de dwara yaw de --- sha hagha che ye da zra shesha safa wa
[If they’re Ghilzi or Abdali they are both one- - The best among them is one whose heart is crystal clear.]

He always saw Pashtun as one!

thanks, ill have a gander

ORBAL
06-16-2007, 04:07 PM
Worbal Khana..I wish I could read in Pashto but sadly I can't....Could you do me a Favour by translating it into English...I thank you..:)

I am in the process of doing that and I will try and translate it into English. I have the chart of the family trees of other famous Afghans who did great services to Afghanistan. I will do that too, ba khair.

ORBAL
06-16-2007, 04:08 PM
I always dreamed about uniting every Afghan Tribes as One Single and United Nation...All the way from Amu to Abaseen...From Indian Ocean to the Hindukush, from Border of Iran to the Border Of Kashmir.....One United Afghanistan Our Homeland , Our Motherland, Our Fatherland.

In reality this was the dream of Ahmad Shah Baba, too. He saw no difference among Afghans and he even accommodated Hindus from India to work as clerks in Kandahar. During his time a delegation of Pashtuns came from Peshawar to meet with him. Among his ministers and advisers someone asked them about their tribal linage, etc. Ahmad Shah quickly interjected the discussion and said, “bas dagha che pa Pashto khabari darsara kawe yani che pashtana de.” [their spoken language of Pashto should indicate that they’re Pashtuns].

Anyway, tracing family tree is only good for finding our linage and I personally don’t see any difference between different tribes other than individual differences that exists among all humans.

Nick
06-17-2007, 02:38 PM
In reality this was the dream of Ahmad Shah Baba, too. He saw no difference among Afghans and he even accommodated Hindus from India to work as clerks in Kandahar. During his time a delegation of Pashtuns came from Peshawar to meet with him. Among his ministers and advisers someone asked them about their tribal linage, etc. Ahmad Shah quickly interjected the discussion and said, “bas dagha che pa Pashto khabari darsara kawe yani che pashtana de.” [their spoken language of Pashto should indicate that they’re Pashtuns].

Anyway, tracing family tree is only good for finding our linage and I personally don’t see any difference between different tribes other than individual differences that exists among all humans.

Back then I agree Ahmad Shah baba was right and may Allah bless his kind soul but today not anymore. Anyways Its matter of Interenet and learning stuff, today even Americans, Pakis, and other Indics also know our language. I would like to thank Ahmad shah baba for the short lived unity among Afghans. But everyone knows sadly history have showed Afghans would always fight eachother and there be few times where they can be united. I would like to pary that may Allah change this and may we learn from our past. From disunity we get nothing and by unity we get everything from housing to food, to developing our nation. But sadly i can say that for the next 10-20 years or last forever if in this case the Government continues to make friendship with enemies.:closedeyes:

Nick
06-17-2007, 02:39 PM
Worbal Khana..I wish I could read in Pashto but sadly I can't....Could you do me a Favour by translating it into English...I thank you..:)
Thanks worbel that was kind of you, I know Farhad did alot of hard work even thought I too found some mistakes but anyways this was nice. Thank you.

ORBAL
06-17-2007, 04:00 PM
Back then I agree Ahmad Shah baba was right and may Allah bless his kind soul but today not anymore. Anyways Its matter of Interenet and learning stuff, today even Americans, Pakis, and other Indics also know our language. I would like to thank Ahmad shah baba for the short lived unity among Afghans. But everyone knows sadly history have showed Afghans would always fight eachother and there be few times where they can be united. I would like to pary that may Allah change this and may we learn from our past. From disunity we get nothing and by unity we get everything from housing to food, to developing our nation. But sadly i can say that for the next 10-20 years or last forever if in this case the Government continues to make friendship with enemies.:closedeyes:


Back then I agree Ahmad Shah baba was right and may Allah bless his kind soul but today not anymore.

What are you trying to convey, Einstein? :D

bibi_shereeni
06-18-2007, 06:33 AM
i don't think there's any difference between diff tribes... i only see a difference in the name....

Nainawaaz
06-18-2007, 01:42 PM
The funny thing is that many of " farsi " speaking sect of Afghanistan think they are tajik, and then they say they are mohmmadzai or popalzai. I always laugh at them that they dont even know that they are ethnically pashtun and not tajik. Sometimes they refer to them as tajiks versus pashtuns and when i bring up the fact that they are pashtuns, their intelligent response is always that they speak farsi so how can they be pashtun? lol

Farhad
06-18-2007, 01:55 PM
The funny thing is that many of " farsi " speaking sect of Afghanistan think they are tajik, and then they say they are mohmmadzai or popalzai. I always laugh at them that they dont even know that they are ethnically pashtun and not tajik. Sometimes they refer to them as tajiks versus pashtuns and when i bring up the fact that they are pashtuns, their intelligent response is always that they speak farsi so how can they be pashtun? lol

They are just persianized..Pity how they are ..I know a girl here in Toronto..whose grandfather is Mohammadzai and her mom is Popalzai...yet she claimed to be Pure Tajik...sometime the parents do not educated the kids with proper understanding of thier own race or etnicity..

I dare to say that more then 50 % of so-called Tajik are actually Persianized Pashtun.:)

farikhtay
06-18-2007, 02:25 PM
[COLOR="Red"][B]
Malaysian Yusofzai : Farhad:tongue:

You're a Malaysian too?

ORBAL
06-18-2007, 05:58 PM
The funny thing is that many of " farsi " speaking sect of Afghanistan think they are tajik, and then they say they are mohmmadzai or popalzai. I always laugh at them that they dont even know that they are ethnically pashtun and not tajik. Sometimes they refer to them as tajiks versus pashtuns and when i bring up the fact that they are pashtuns, their intelligent response is always that they speak farsi so how can they be pashtun? lol

So what has language got to do with ethnicity or family tree? You write in English here does that mean you are English?

Farhad
06-19-2007, 05:02 AM
You're a Malaysian too?

Are You Malaysian ?

farikhtay
06-19-2007, 06:04 AM
Ya saya dari Malaysia tapi BM saya tak bagus lah!

Nick
06-19-2007, 06:41 AM
The funny thing is that many of " farsi " speaking sect of Afghanistan think they are tajik, and then they say they are mohmmadzai or popalzai. I always laugh at them that they dont even know that they are ethnically pashtun and not tajik. Sometimes they refer to them as tajiks versus pashtuns and when i bring up the fact that they are pashtuns, their intelligent response is always that they speak farsi so how can they be pashtun? lol

You be supprised to find that Tajiks just make up less then 5% of the nation and they came from Bokara/Samarkand. During 1920 there were 600,000 of been recorded entering Afghanistan (NOW THEY ARE AFGHANIZED) But idiot Russians intentionally or unintentionally added another 25% Darians as part of them. Tajiks are Turkic people of PArsi speakers of Central Asia. They are mixed Mongolid/Turkic/Aryanic (Afghan/Iranian) and Arabs. They are not different then their Uzbek brothers, and their Genetic makeup is almost same as Hazaras. In fact they look Uzbek and sometimes Afghan (After all Southern Tajikistan was part of Afghanistan and native of that region still carry their Afghan looks.



always laugh at them that they dont even know that they are ethnically pashtun and not tajik. Sometimes they refer to them as tajiks versus pashtuns and when i bring up the fact that they are pashtuns, their intelligent response is always that they speak farsi so how can they be pashtun?
We admit there are Tajikistanis among us and in fact Rabani accepted another 500,000 of them during Tajik civil war of Tajikistan and those people were given Afghan passports and in 2001 everyone living in Afghanistan (Including Arabs/Chachis/Uzbeks/Kazaks/Tajiks) were given Afghan passport saying "AFGHAN" where as it used to be "TAjikistani/Tajik/Uzbekistani/Uzbek) and that's how the new national antum is designed for everyone.

The reason their reasons are like Afghans is because they are Afghanized. OR they are just ANG who are just unaware of the word "Tajik" and they call themselves based on what Western Media has named them. 27% of our nation are Darians/Farsiwans but its recorded as "TAjik" which is unfair since many ANG's are just lost and they don't know what to call themselves. They can't say "Farsiwan" because this is not a famous known word to the west its like 1975 being in NEw York and saying "I am muslim" they be lost, cause they know muslims as "Mohammadians" (Jews word) same with Farsiwans. Second they can't say "Persian" because it means "Iranian" where as in reality "PErsian" refers to people of Pars. Tajik has been been in europeans books (Thanks to stupid Russians) and it has reached into the west right around 1994-1996. It had reached into Afghan communist books in 1960s and only few people know what it meant, and by 1975 communist Gov used it, and by 1980s when Afghans were aware of this new word, and now people who havn't been to Tajikistan/Uzbekistan don't know how Tajiks look like. Thanks to the TV that nowdays they have seen what Darians saw they went to Tajikistan, and noticing the differences we proudly say "WE ARE AFGHAN" :closedeyes:

BELIEVE me I as a Farsiwan been to Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and other nations and I know how Afghan looks like and how they are recognized. FOr those who say Farsiwans and Tajiks are same LOL then you are far lost into the dark.

Nick
06-19-2007, 07:09 AM
They are just persianized..Pity how they are ..I know a girl here in Toronto..whose grandfather is Mohammadzai and her mom is Popalzai...yet she claimed to be Pure Tajik...sometime the parents do not educated the kids with proper understanding of thier own race or etnicity..

I dare to say that more then 50 % of so-called Tajik are actually Persianized Pashtun.:)


They are just persianized..Pity how they are

Dear Farhad I would't use that word If I was an Afghan.
Persianization is the word used by wrong beliveve of pan-Iranists to separate people who doesn't have Irani/Arazi/Afghani looks, another words its refered to HAzaras, Tajiks (If they know what it means), Uzbeks, Turkmens (Afshari), Punjabis/Indians/Pakistani/Turks anybody who shares something in their culture or language but couldn't have any facial connection with them to identify them as "Iranian looking" is counted as Persianized.

The fact that the only people who are Persianized and everyone knows that they are HAzaras who make up almost everything to a Iranian being but are not from their race/Ethnic and that wasn't until Safivads came and killed many Timurids and forced them into Shiasam only to take revenge from timurids who killed have said to kill most number of Iranians after Gangis Khan and then the 3rd comes the Arabs and 4th comes the Afghans. Anyways that's something you should take into consideration when using such words. We Afghans admit that at least some large number of them have our looks but that's duo to Afghan invasions/Aryanic invasion into Tamil land/Elamides. In fact large number of them belong to Afghan Race OR its called Iran-o-Afghan Race


I know a girl here in Toronto..whose grandfather is Mohammadzai and her mom is Popalzai...yet she claimed to be Pure Tajik...sometime the parents do not educated the kids with proper understanding of thier own race or etnicity..
LOL My own cousin thought he was Tadjik LOL until we came and told how Tajiks are different and we showed him videos and pictures until he begin to feel like Sht. (YEah he Was 14 then) LOL I know a lot of people who just don't wanted to be associated with Iranians and use these words to make their job easier, cause Farsi sound like Iranian Persian and Dari is not known to many westerners and saying Farsiwan is even worse, they can't even say "Wan" so its better to go with the Russian term to refer to their language, and not being associated with Iranians.

However in large Persian communities Afghan people have no choice other then saying "Persian" cause he I have seen it. And I know it. Even if others normal Americans come into the shop finding one Afghan and one Iranian communicating LOL they ask "Hey people speak the same language" and before the Afghan replys the iranian guy goes "Yeah its all the same" LOL "Persian" LOL

Nainawaaz
06-19-2007, 07:23 AM
So what has language got to do with ethnicity or family tree? You write in English here does that mean you are English?

Read my post again....that is exactly my point: language has nothing to do with ethnicity. But majority of farsi speaking afghans believe since they speak farsi, then they must be tajik because that is how for recent years the media and everyone portraid afghans. For example, I am ethnically pashtun because I am from the Popalzai tribe, but we speak dari. So I can not say that since i speak dari, i am tajik. My ethnicity is pashtun but my language is dari.

Nick
06-19-2007, 07:45 AM
Read my post again....that is exactly my point: language has nothing to do with ethnicity. But majority of farsi speaking afghans believe since they speak farsi, then they must be tajik because that is how for recent years the media and everyone portraid afghans. For example, I am ethnically pashtun because I am from the Popalzai tribe, but we speak dari. So I can not say that since i speak dari, i am tajik. My ethnicity is pashtun but my language is dari.

See dear people make big mistakes to simple modern man made words such as "Ethncity" "Race" confusing the two yet both could be argued and somehow come out to be the same. Ethnic ? What does it mean? and Race what does that mean? both has to do with origin, culture, ancestors, root language, history (share of history), the region, and even religion which has big affect over intermarrages. Notice how I have not added langauge, and yet language is one of the most important of Identity, like French, English, Persi, Uzbeki, Tajiki, German, Russian, Farsi and Pashtu.

You are Russian if you speak Ruski (Russian in English).
You are Persian if you speak Safivadi parsi language of Iran.
You are Pashtwan (Pashtun in English) if you speak PAshtu.
You are Fariwan if you speak Farsi (also Known as Dari -->Formal)
You are Tajik if you speak Tajiki (Turkic version of Parsi/Dari)
You are Uzbek if you speak Uzbeki, (Remember Turkic are only identified by their language)
You are French if you speak French
You are English if you speak English
You are German if you speak German
etc etc etc
Etc etc etc etc etc etc
See how Language comes a big part of identity, now does it reflect Ethncity/Race?

I can be Afghan and my great grandchildern would be Afghan but they might not speak my language. SO Would my childern be calling themselves "Pashtun/Pashtuwan" if they don't speak Pashtu, would they be calling themselves "Fariswan/Darian" if they don't speak a word of Farsi? One should ask an Afghan from Australia whose forefather came in the country during 1800 or Ask Farhad. HE would let you know.

here is an Example:
Philippines have so many languages and they are so apart its almost hard for different island to understand eachother, yet they look the Same they almost belong to one general race or atleast 80% of them are pure from being spanish or Indics. ANd they have over 10 Official languages. LOL But one people.

Farhad
06-19-2007, 08:06 AM
Ya saya dari Malaysia tapi BM saya tak bagus lah!


Dari malaysia..di mana ? Dan Kamu bercakap dalam Bahasa Apa ? Melayu/Afghan/Urdu ?

farikhtay
06-19-2007, 12:26 PM
Pashto :p Dari KL- ampang specifically!

ORBAL
06-19-2007, 04:35 PM
Read my post again....that is exactly my point: language has nothing to do with ethnicity. But majority of farsi speaking afghans believe since they speak farsi, then they must be tajik because that is how for recent years the media and everyone portraid afghans. For example, I am ethnically pashtun because I am from the Popalzai tribe, but we speak dari. So I can not say that since i speak dari, i am tajik. My ethnicity is pashtun but my language is dari.


Ok, I understand your point now.

~Aryaam~
07-01-2007, 08:36 AM
farhad tabla ,there r few tribes missing:rolleyes:

Farhad
07-01-2007, 09:01 AM
farhad tabla ,there r few tribes missing:rolleyes:

Feed me please...Then I might be able to enlarge it in this Thread..:)

~Aryaam~
07-01-2007, 09:16 AM
well lets see ,there is taraki tribe ,qureshi tribe ,alokozai tribe ,and there is one more that i know is missing there but cant remember the name right now .lolz

i would really like to know abt these tribes ,thanx :)

ORBAL
07-01-2007, 03:45 PM
well lets see ,there is taraki tribe ,qureshi tribe ,alokozai tribe ,and there is one more that i know is missing there but cant remember the name right now .lolz

i would really like to know abt these tribes ,thanx :)

Taraki take its head from Ghilzi/ Sulaiman khel

Quresh are Arabs as our Prophet Muhamad (pbuh) also came from that linage.

Alokozi relates to a sub branch of Abdali

Farhad
07-01-2007, 04:39 PM
well lets see ,there is taraki tribe ,qureshi tribe ,alokozai tribe ,and there is one more that i know is missing there but cant remember the name right now .lolz

i would really like to know abt these tribes ,thanx :)


Please read Thoroughly and you might find those name and I didn't Include Qureshi because thier Ethnic are not of Afghan but Arabs..They may have adopted Afghan tribal system or Afghan way of life..but they are not Afghans by blood.

~Aryaam~
07-02-2007, 03:29 AM
i did check thoroughly but couldnt find them ,dont know .

so qureshi arent afghans?:o so that means i m half arab :D

Nick
07-03-2007, 10:55 AM
i did check thoroughly but couldnt find them ,dont know .

so qureshi arent afghans?:o so that means i m half arab :D
BTW dear the Qureshis mostly live in northern Afghanistan, or just above Kabul, like for example Karti parwan, puli Kumria, Charakhar, and Kallia Shada. :) I know a lot of them from these area and there is a large tribe or a large number of them in Panjsher. Althought they kept their names most of them are mixed with Afghan just like you said half arab/half Afghan but its not really for sure unless the Qureshis just marry among themselves, But since them arabs came into Afghanistan some 1200 years ago which means the lingage should of been lost.

Hazrat bin Qasim bin Al Abrahem-e-Qurashi who is very well know Afghan Arab claims a very large number of Qurashi tribe came into Afghanistan at the same time large number of Afghans went into Syria and Iraq/Arabia. You may research if you want. One of the famous Afghan like Al-Afghani (NOT Jamaludin) was the first Dean of the first Modern Arab University of Syria. And today he's known as the most Famous Arab literature until this day and according to him he was a non-Arab and came from an Afghan tribe:yes: . BTW Don't forget the Palestinian Afghan, Abdul Hameed Al Afghani who coincided with the first issuance of the first Palestinian currency in 1927.:cool:

~Aryaam~
07-03-2007, 11:31 AM
thank you very nick for ur information:)




farhad:dry:

~Aryaam~
07-05-2007, 06:06 AM
farhad ,u lazy bone lol ,show me where r the tribes i asked u about

suraya9
07-05-2007, 07:41 AM
I am durrani...:winking0001:

Durrani

Durrani (Persian: درانی) or Abdali (Persian: ابدالی) tribe is one of the two largest Pashtun tribes of Afghanistan and is also found in large numbers in western Pakistan. They are estimated to be roughly 20% of the population of Afghanistan and number around 7 million there with another 1-2 million found in Pakistan and hundreds of thousands also live in northeast Iran. The Durrani are the most "Persianized" of Pashtun tribes, often bilingual in Dari (or Afghan Persian), as well as arguably being among the most urbanized and educated of the Pashtuns in Afghanistan.

The Durrani have been prominent leaders, as the royal family of Afghanistan is derived from the tribe, and a substantial number of Durrani are bureaucrats and public officials, as well as businessmen and merchants. The particular dialect of Pashto favored by the Durrani tends to be tinged with a slight Persian inflection and is considered the more genteel and urbane dialect, often viewed by Pashtuns overall as the more 'proper' dialect, as opposed to the rougher "Pukhtu" version favored in the north and by most of the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The Durrani, like most other Pashtuns, are Muslim and are mostly of the Hanafi Sunni Islamic sect and, like most Pashtuns, continue to follow the Pashtun honor code known as Pashtunwali.


A brief history

The Durrani are, like other Pashtuns, primarily descendants of Aryan invaders of the Iranian variant (as well as the various invaders, such as the Greeks, and migrants who have passed through Afghanistan over the centuries) and probably arose in what is today southern Afghanistan near the Suleiman Mountains at some point between 2000 BCE to 1500 BCE. The Durrani were known as the Abdali since Islamic times and frequently lived under Persian rule in ancient times. They emerged near the city of Kandahar and were most likely Pagan, Buddhist and Zoroastrian in religion prior to the coming of Muslim Arabs who began the conversion of the local population to Islam. The Abdalis appear to have begun to spread out during the early Middle Ages along with other Pashtun tribes and came to inhabit most of what is today Afghanistan by 1000 CE at the latest. Often affiliated with the Persians of Iran, some rose to upper ranks of the Persian military during the reign of the Safavids and gained particular prominence under the rule of Nadir Shah. One of his prominent generals was a young Pashtun Abdali chieftain named Ahmad Shah Abdali who would later make himself the king of Afghanistan.

The name 'Durrani' or 'Durr-i-Durran' means the 'pearl of pearls' in Persian and was given to the Abdali tribe in 1747 when Ahmad Shah Abdali united the Pashtun tribes following a loya jirga and changed his own name to Ahmad Shah Durrani when he became the king of Afghanistan and founded the Durrani Empire. Since this period, the kings of Afghanistan have been of Durrani extraction. The Durrani were the most divided Pashtun tribe during the rule of the Ghilzai-dominated Taliban, with some having openly opposed them. The Durrani are the politically dominant Pashtun group in Afghanistan as the current President of Afghanistan is Hamid Karzai who is of the Durrani sub-group known as the Popalzay and has close ties to the former king of Afghanistan Zahir Shah, another member of the Durrani tribe.


Current social conditions

Like most Pashtun groups, the Durrani can be sub-divided into smaller clans and subtribes (such as the aforementioned Popalzai) which will still acknowledge each other as kinsmen. The literacy rate of the Durrani is the highest of all of the Pashtun tribes in Afghanistan and hovers around 25%. Perhaps the most liberal of the Pashtun groups, the Durrani are currently at the forefront of rebuilding war-torn Afghanistan and are quickly filling the ranks of the military and are valued as city officials and policemen in cities such as Kandahar and Kabul. The Durrani in Pakistan are largely refugees, but many have become prominent merchants in Quetta and Peshawar. The Durrani continue to live in close proximity to other Afghans and culturally overlap in many ways with the Tajiks with whom they often share more cultural and socio-economic traits in comparison to the more tribal Pashtuns such as the Ghilzai, who are the other major Pashtun group in Afghanistan. The Durrani are part of Sarbans, a Pashtun tribal group.

Nick
07-05-2007, 08:38 AM
thank you very nick for ur information:)




farhad:dry:


You are more than welcome dear.

farikhtay
09-12-2007, 06:35 PM
i did check thoroughly but couldnt find them ,dont know .

so qureshi arent afghans?:o so that means i m half arab :D

You're Pakhtun. I know many Pakhtun Qureshis (who never spoke any other language besides Pakhto for generations) and yes, they look Pakhtun.

Edr!s
09-14-2007, 01:51 PM
Worbal Khana..I wish I could read in Pashto but sadly I can't....Could you do me a Favour by translating it into English...I thank you..:)
Farhad jan you really cant read Pashto :D That chart is written in Dari:lol:
but thanks Farhad for the information about all my watandars and my own tribe (Kakar)

OhMyGod!
09-15-2007, 12:11 AM
My mums fm Laghman and shes a "Jabar Khel"??

Any info...??

Pashto Dreamer
09-15-2007, 02:51 AM
My mums fm Laghman and shes a "Jabar Khel"??

Any info...??

In most cases the word Khel denotes clan.... it is a clan of some tribe.... not the tribe itself for example i ma Gaun Khel of the Khattak tribe..... i think the only exception to the rule is the tribe called Uthman Khel which is a tribe initself

ORBAL
09-16-2007, 06:19 PM
Farhad jan you really cant read Pashto :D That chart is written in Dari:lol:
but thanks Farhad for the information about all my watandars and my own tribe (Kakar)

There are a few references to that chart in Farsi since the historian who quotes it in his history book is written in Farsi. But the actual source is Pashto and all the names written are either Arabic or Pashto. So apart from a few references in Farsi the rest of the chart is in Pashto. I am looking for a proper script to upload it in English.

ORBAL
09-16-2007, 06:23 PM
You're Pakhtun. I know many Pakhtun Qureshis (who never spoke any other language besides Pakhto for generations) and yes, they look Pakhtun.


Yes I have cousins who are Quresh and Sayeed and they neither speak Arabic nor Farsi. They have spoken Pashto for generations. Language has very little to do with race.

Edr!s
09-16-2007, 11:02 PM
There are a few references to that chart in Farsi since the historian who quotes it in his history book is written in Farsi. But the actual source is Pashto and all the names written are either Arabic or Pashto. So apart from a few references in Farsi the rest of the chart is in Pashto. I am looking for a proper script to upload it in English.
Good I am looking forward for it :thumbup1:

OhMyGod!
09-19-2007, 11:41 PM
In most cases the word Khel denotes clan.... it is a clan of some tribe.... not the tribe itself for example i ma Gaun Khel of the Khattak tribe..... i think the only exception to the rule is the tribe called Uthman Khel which is a tribe initself

Thanks. Is there anyway of knowing what tribe my mums family originates from (apart from asking her and going back to Laghman to find out)

Farhad
09-20-2007, 05:47 AM
Thanks. Is there anyway of knowing what tribe my mums family originates from (apart from asking her and going back to Laghman to find out)

What is your mom's last name or which district in Laghman was she born in ? By that you might be able to narrow it down..

reyes
09-20-2007, 06:03 AM
Yousafzai here

Farhad
09-20-2007, 08:37 AM
My mums fm Laghman and shes a "Jabar Khel"??

Any info...??



Jabar Khel are sub tribes of Ahmadzai. They are well know for as a prestigeous sub tribe. The reason for that is that it use to have strong leaders and a very primitive war-monging character. They use to be a very powerful.Even in present time, there are many tribesmen who own hundreds of hectares of fertile land across the eastern provinces. Jabel Khel are mainly located in Laghman, Nangahar, logar and Kabul.

Farhad
09-20-2007, 08:38 AM
Yousafzai here

Really, I am a Yusofzai from both side of my parents.

DeIslamShagird
09-20-2007, 01:11 PM
Farhad! Best post I've seen in a long time. Very educational and wonderful for our younger generations who don't know much about their tribes. Good deed.

Farhad
09-20-2007, 01:33 PM
Farhad! Best post I've seen in a long time. Very educational and wonderful for our younger generations who don't know much about their tribes. Good deed.

Thank you. Just want others to know a little about thier tribes..

OhMyGod!
09-22-2007, 10:05 PM
Jabar Khel are sub tribes of Ahmadzai. They are well know for as a prestigeous sub tribe. The reason for that is that it use to have strong leaders and a very primitive war-monging character. They use to be a very powerful.Even in present time, there are many tribesmen who own hundreds of hectares of fertile land across the eastern provinces. Jabel Khel are mainly located in Laghman, Nangahar, logar and Kabul.

My mums from Char Bagh of Laghman and her maidan name was Jabar Khel. Does that still fit the description of being an Ahmadzai?:shy: And Ahmadzai's are from the family of the Ghilzai's right??

Farhad
09-23-2007, 08:51 AM
My mums from Char Bagh of Laghman and her maidan name was Jabar Khel. Does that still fit the description of being an Ahmadzai?:shy: And Ahmadzai's are from the family of the Ghilzai's right??

Yes, Every Jabar Khel in That section are sub tribes of Ahmadzai and Ahmadzai belong to Ghilzai Tribe which were wondering Kochi tribes which many centuries ago some of the tribes settled and became farmers and Martial Tribes

Pashto Dreamer
09-23-2007, 10:38 AM
Yousafzai here

damn u yousezais! nah just kiddin u guys are cool.... 1 of my mates is a yousefzai Pashtoon

Pashto Dreamer
09-23-2007, 10:43 AM
Really, I am a Yusofzai from both side of my parents.

lol Farhad it only matters what tribe ur dad belongs to coz u follow ur dads side.... e.g if ur mom is Khattak but ur dad is Mohmand then u r Mohmand Pashtoon

Farhad
09-23-2007, 07:26 PM
lol Farhad it only matters what tribe ur dad belongs to coz u follow ur dads side.... e.g if ur mom is Khattak but ur dad is Mohmand then u r Mohmand Pashtoon

I know that My dear Brother but I just want to state that Dad & Mom are both Yusofzai.:winking0001:

OhMyGod!
09-24-2007, 03:24 AM
Yes, Every Jabar Khel in That section are sub tribes of Ahmadzai and Ahmadzai belong to Ghilzai Tribe which were wondering Kochi tribes which many centuries ago some of the tribes settled and became farmers and Martial Tribes

Thanks mate! :)

Farhad
09-24-2007, 05:01 AM
Thanks mate! :)

You are most welcome:)

reyes
09-25-2007, 03:33 AM
Really, I am a Yusofzai from both side of my parents.

Well that makes two of us here :)

Farhad
09-29-2007, 06:39 PM
Well that makes two of us here :)

Which part of Afghanistan are you from ? Are you Yusofzai from Qandahar, Kabul, Nengahar or Swat ?

Navid
09-29-2007, 08:37 PM
Jeta Paro

reyes
09-30-2007, 12:15 PM
Which part of Afghanistan are you from ? Are you Yusofzai from Qandahar, Kabul, Nengahar or Swat ?

Well if im honest, im not 100% sure...
my moms family have always lived in Kabul, but we seem to have some family in Swat aswell.. but both sides of my family are pashtoon

sahar786
10-26-2007, 06:23 AM
ohh they are all pashtun tribes?? is there such thing as farsiwan or tajik tribe? like do they have names nn stuff too.. lol i was jus wonderin...

Farhad
10-26-2007, 11:13 AM
ohh they are all pashtun tribes?? is there such thing as farsiwan or tajik tribe? like do they have names nn stuff too.. lol i was jus wonderin...

I am sure there are Tribes within the Tajiki Nation, I'll Try to look it up for you..:)

wardakstar
10-27-2007, 05:58 PM
these all trib are in sol and heart , ( for afghan) are ( paraday ) , they love to be with Pakistani . , but in Afghanistan these are not even like to call them self afghan .( they call them self pashtoon ) , also these are, love to even speak ( afghan pashto) with Pakistani Urdu accent , like jelal abti , and laghamani , and kamaie . love to be talk and sing and dress like peshowri , and Qandahari love to be like kowata wallah . and from other said we have a city to name of heart . who even control total economic of city of mashhad during war and even now , they never ever call them self Irani , or not even love to talk or use Irani word or accent in there conversation , a 25% test of long time ago now also they have in there language . but when you ask them ,are you from Iran . quickly they answer you , alhamdulellah I am from Afghanistan . but all our pashtoon like always have Pakistani ( shinakhte card ) and passport , and they never even thinks of Afghanistan , . from all this Pashtun tribal show me one who don a great job for Afghanistan .


sorry bro but i find ur opinion a bit disrespectful. How can you blame a refugee who grows up in a foreign soceity and expect him not take up an accent i.e. pashtu accent of Peshawari's. You would probably be very happy your kid to pick up an english accent in AMerica or britain. And i am not sure to how big is the spectrum of your friends in terms of Afghans from different part of countries. BUt i know quite a few AFGHANS whose mother tongue is dari, but common when they talk, you would probably think that they were iranians, they would listen to their music and all that stuff. BUt i wouldnt blame those guys bcz half of their lives have been spent in exile from their country as a refugee. I wonder once more to if you have ever been to HERAT. if you havent then you go there you would think you have been to Iran. I am still proud of each herati, there is no denial that there accents are remarkably similar to Iranians.
Plus Pashtuns having shnakhte card.. common you would probably have American/European or whatever nationallity so that you could improve your life and career prospects. So how would have a refugee sent his son to school for the best education if he didnt have a shnakhte card? THere was only one seat for an Afghan in Peshawar Medical school.
One of the difinte facts or near to a fact statement would be:
Afghans on a whole are much more influenced by Indian culture than Pakistani, and there is no difference b/w their cultures whatsoever.
Be True Afghan and have Respect for ALL the tribes, languages, Accents and The countrymen.
Afghanistan has hundreds of cultures, and we should be proud of each of them..
Respect.

wardakstar
10-27-2007, 06:00 PM
Salaam alikum Farhad jaana,
Dera manana for enriching us, with information about our great Pashtun tribes.
I wonder to why Wardak/Noori? are missing from the list?
Thanks

Farhad
10-28-2007, 10:05 AM
Salaam alikum Farhad jaana,
Dera manana for enriching us, with information about our great Pashtun tribes.
I wonder to why Wardak/Noori? are missing from the list?
Thanks

The Wardaks are Karlani Pashtoons by origin. This tribe came into being in the region of Barmal Ghar of the Sulaiman range of mountains and from there the whole group of the Karlanis spread into the regions they inhabit today.
To their west lie the mountains of Hazarajat and to the other direction the Ghilzai tribes. Their area from north to south is like an oasis, surrounded by mountains to east and west. Their dwelling places lies in the Parapamisos mountains that divide Logar from Kharwara and the western range of mountains belong to Hazarajat. The river that flows to the south of their region is wrongly called the Ghazni river and waters a lot of their fields. Their northern territory is watered by the Logar river. The famous villages of this region are: Tangey, Sheikhabad, Saidabad, Shniz, Khwat, Jaghtu, Dai Mirdad and Chak.

Some Wardaks also live in the provinces of Kunar, Herat, Hilmand, Zabul, Ghazni and Baghlan. Those Wardaks that live in Kunar dwell in Loy Goriga, Ganshal and Jandul. The elders of Ganshal say that their original region is that of the Wardaks and they belong to the clan of Mayar. About 170 years earlier a few Wardak came to the region of Dir and some stayed there, while others went to Jandul and Ganshal. From Ganshal some families of the Wardaks went to Dangam 140 years ago. They became the farmers of the Salarzais and after some time they cultivated fallow land, which they later bought. Some Wardaks think that their ancestors fled and came here in the first governmental year of Amir Abdul Rahman Khan. Later they were given land by the Khan of Asmar and they stayed here. They cultivated their own land then. There is less trading by them and they are intermingled with the Salarzais and the Mamonds. All aspects of life, including their accent of language is influenced by those two tribes. Also, this part of Wardaks that live in Herat, have their own region, which is called Wardak area, and belongs to the administrative unit of Angil. Some Wardak live in Helmand province in the districts of Nadali and Nawe Barakzai. Other Wardaks live in the periphery of Rawalpindi in Chach and Natu. The abode of the Wardaks is very green, cultivated and fertile, but the autumn (fall) period is very short. Rice, wheat and barley are the products of it. Wardaks are all busy in agriculture and they are very hard working. Some of them are also cattle breeders. Their villages are very small. The names of their famous clans are the following:

Mamak, Mayar, Mirkhel, Noori, Larrem, Gadai, Malekyarkhel, Khwaremkhel, Adinkhel and Massrikhel. The clan of Mirkhel is the biggest by number and then come the Mayar.

Farhad
10-28-2007, 10:10 AM
ohh they are all pashtun tribes?? is there such thing as farsiwan or tajik tribe? like do they have names nn stuff too.. lol i was jus wonderin...



Tajiks are entirely considered as One tribe (ethnic) and they are not divided into many tribals as the Afghans are. Tajik may have migrated into many lands in Central Asia but they are always considered as One.

If anyone has more informations please enlighten us all:)

sahar786
10-29-2007, 06:25 AM
oh sorryy i meant.. like.. u now know theres pashtun tribes.. well I'm not pashtun so I'm wonderin like are there tribes for other afghans too like hazaras and tajiks(farsi zaban ppl) UGhh im soo confuseddddd!

sahar786
10-29-2007, 06:25 AM
I didn't mean the tajiks from tajikistan lol

Farhad
10-29-2007, 06:43 AM
oh sorryy i meant.. like.. u now know theres pashtun tribes.. well I'm not pashtun so I'm wonderin like are there tribes for other afghans too like hazaras and tajiks(farsi zaban ppl) UGhh im soo confuseddddd!

I know what you mean my dear..when I mention Afghans Tribes that's means Pashtun Tribal Nation..and when I say Tajik it also means all Tajiks from all corner of them world and so far I tried to look for any information available on Tajik but non has better info on thier tribal society and therefore I took as Tribalistic society dont exist in Tajik nation.

sahar786
10-29-2007, 06:47 AM
ohh ok! thanks. This is really interesting stuff, I'd love to read more stuff on this.

Nainawaaz
10-29-2007, 11:07 AM
Well, if you investigate more of your past, you will proabably end up ethnically pashtun, like most of the afghans.

Pashto Dreamer
10-30-2007, 01:10 AM
Well, if you investigate more of your past, you will proabably end up ethnically pashtun, like most of the afghans.

lol:D

sahar786
10-30-2007, 03:16 AM
true hahaha! well my grandmas side speaks pashto soo that explains a lot :S LOL!

Nainawaaz
10-30-2007, 07:06 AM
Well there you go Sahar jan, you have the true " afghan " blood in you..lol

ORBAL
10-30-2007, 08:44 AM
ohh they are all pashtun tribes?? is there such thing as farsiwan or tajik tribe? like do they have names nn stuff too.. lol i was jus wonderin...

Sahar jan it’s easy. You can make your own tribe. Just add the “zad” or “zai” bit to your surname and this by itself can be a tribe provided it passes from the father’s side.

There are also different tribes among the Arabs and Jews. In the case of Jews the linage is usually traced from mother’s side.

sahar786
10-30-2007, 10:19 AM
hahah ooo ! thankss!

sidkhan
12-15-2007, 09:45 AM
HI Farhad,

This is a fantastic place and it is amazing the information you have managed to distibute.

I unfortunately know very little about my people except that we are Suleman Khels. My great grandfather moved to the Hazara district, in particular Tarbela when he was middle aged. Would you be able to offer more information about my people ? your help would be greatly appreciated.

Spartan-117
12-15-2007, 01:53 PM
Thanx for that Farhad. Im Yousufzai as well!

Farhad
12-16-2007, 11:22 AM
Thanx for that Farhad. Im Yousufzai as well!

You are welcome and Where are you from ? Kandahar, Kabul, Nengahar , Swat , India or Malaysia ?

Farhad
12-16-2007, 11:51 AM
HI Farhad,

This is a fantastic place and it is amazing the information you have managed to distibute.

I unfortunately know very little about my people except that we are Suleman Khels. My great grandfather moved to the Hazara district, in particular Tarbela when he was middle aged. Would you be able to offer more information about my people ? your help would be greatly appreciated.



This is a video of the Sulaimankhel tribe which is found in both Pakistan & Afghanistan performing the traditional Atan dance.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4U4sphdTgMA


They are known as a fierce tribe and are well respected in both countries. Some of the fighters in this tribe fought valiantly in many historic wars(from the time of Alexander the Great, To Chengiz Khan, Mahmud of Ghazni to more recent historical battles as that of involving the British.

Please pay attentions to the Longi worn by the Sulaimankhels.

Sulaiman Khel belong to the Ahmadzai Tribes which are from the Ghilzai Tribe. They are mostly from Waziristan and Paktia,later migrated to NWFP and mainly in the Marwat area. Many have also migrated further east, as you've mention in the Hazara District on the east of Abaseen River (Indus) and have adopted Hindko is thier language (Those in the Hazara) the others still maintain Pashto as the First Language.

If you are intrested to know more about Sulaiman Khel please click on the Fourth link in thise Google Page and later you'll received an Abode page stating all the names related to the Sulaiman Khel (Ahmadzai ) tribes & Clan


http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4ADBF_enCA225CA225&q=sulaiman+khel+



Thank you

Spartan-117
12-16-2007, 02:20 PM
You are welcome and Where are you from ? Kandahar, Kabul, Nengahar , Swat , India or Malaysia ?

Mardan originally but that goes back like 4 generations or so.

Selgy
12-17-2007, 08:44 AM
sAlaaamona!!!\

hey anyone have any information about the Hussain Khel tribe please let me know ???

Vivazpta
12-17-2007, 10:42 AM
Do you have any info on them already? Which part of the region do they live in? Are they a sub-tribe of one of the major tribes? With the Khel names often times there are several different sub-tribes with the same name.

Farhad
12-17-2007, 01:31 PM
Mardan originally but that goes back like 4 generations or so.

Nice place ..My mom's Parents are from Madyan in central Swat.

Farhad
12-17-2007, 01:32 PM
sAlaaamona!!!\

hey anyone have any information about the Hussain Khel tribe please let me know ???

Insha'Al'lah I will try to get some information on your Clan..

Selgy
12-17-2007, 09:56 PM
Insha'Al'lah I will try to get some information on your Clan..

thank you, but don't forget i'm wating for you.

Farhad
12-18-2007, 04:59 AM
thank you, but don't forget i'm wating for you.

Insha'Al'lah.I am kinda busy with my Fiscal Reports..:) I will soon

Pashto Dreamer
12-18-2007, 06:12 AM
erm ive said it b4 khel is a clan not a tribe.... a clan is part of a tribe like me im Gaun Khel of Khattak tribe....tribes are divided in2 subtribes then clans so i am khattak and sub tribe is akora khattak and khel is gaun khel..... the only exception i think is Uthman Khel which is a tribe in its own right

sidkhan
12-18-2007, 10:10 AM
Farhad,

Many thanks for the info. Is there anywhere where I can find out the origins of the Ghilzai tribe and history about them?

Once again thanks for your help, its opened a whole new world for me to explore.

Sid

Vivazpta
12-18-2007, 12:05 PM
Is there anywhere where I can find out the origins of the Ghilzai tribe and history about them?


The Ghilzai are the largest Pashtun tribe with numerous different sub tribes. They are the chief rivals of the Durrani tribes for control of Afghanistan. As far as their origins go, there are a couple theories that I know of.

- The common historical belief is that the Ghilzai tribes are originally Turkic in origin, and arrived in Afghanistan in the 10th century. They then mixed with the local inhabitants and emerged as a Pashtun tribe with a unique dialect of Pashtu as their language. Olaf Caroe makes this argument in his book "The Pathans." The name Ghilzai comes from the Turkic word Khalaj which evolved through time from Khalaj to Khalji to Ghalji to Ghalzai or Ghilzai.

- A more traditional belief is that all Pashtun tribes are descended from Qais, who met with the Prophet Mohammad and then brought Islam to the Afghan people. Qais had a son named Bitan. Bitan had a daughter named Bibi Mato who was raped by a Turkish prince Hussein. Because of this Bibi had a son who she named Ghilzai, which means "Son of the thief." All of the Ghilzai tribes then descended from him.

Selgy
12-20-2007, 11:21 AM
Insha'Al'lah.I am kinda busy with my Fiscal Reports..:) I will soon

thakns a world bro,

Selgy
12-23-2007, 11:26 PM
salaam guyz

im from logar my mom is Stanikzai and my father is Hussain khel, i have been searching alot to find the main trib that Hussian Khel belong to, so anyone with help please do tell me and i read all of the thread but didn't find it, waiting for the replies.

Nick
12-26-2007, 05:23 PM
The Ghilzai are the largest Pashtun tribe with numerous different sub tribes. They are the chief rivals of the Durrani tribes for control of Afghanistan. As far as their origins go, there are a couple theories that I know of.

- The common historical belief is that the Ghilzai tribes are originally Turkic in origin, and arrived in Afghanistan in the 10th century. They then mixed with the local inhabitants and emerged as a Pashtun tribe with a unique dialect of Pashtu as their language. Olaf Caroe makes this argument in his book "The Pathans." The name Ghilzai comes from the Turkic word Khalaj which evolved through time from Khalaj to Khalji to Ghalji to Ghalzai or Ghilzai.

- A more traditional belief is that all Pashtun tribes are descended from Qais, who met with the Prophet Mohammad and then brought Islam to the Afghan people. Qais had a son named Bitan. Bitan had a daughter named Bibi Mato who was raped by a Turkish prince Hussein. Because of this Bibi had a son who she named Ghilzai, which means "Son of the thief." All of the Ghilzai tribes then descended from him.


This is just Bulsht. People who don't anything about Turkic shell ask my, I have been there and i have seen it, and i am going to believe some bulsht 100 years old Pan-Turkic ideology that Ahmadzais are Turkic. Hell to that, the only reason Turkic wanted to claim Afghans is because of Ghazniwads from most highest rang to lowest were all from Ghalzai tribes since this empire was located in Ghazali land. We all know both father and grandfather of Mahmud Ghazniwi were Turkic, but his empire which made of people of Ghazni and surrounding areas.


- A more traditional belief is that all Pashtun tribes are descended from Qais, who met with the Prophet Mohammad and then brought Islam to the Afghan people. Qais had a son named Bitan. Bitan had a daughter named Bibi Mato who was raped by a Turkish prince Hussein. Because of this Bibi had a son who she named Ghilzai, which means "Son of the thief." All of the Ghilzai tribes then descended from him

That theory is bulsht, and if we think about Ghalzais are over 13-15 million people (9 million alone in Afghanistan) are bastards of Turks? Hell to anyone for saying such foolish words. There is no facts behind this. LOL This is for those idiots who have no brain cells to calculate, or to consider facts.


And no as far facts are concern Turks were brought into Bokara and Samarkand from north and they were all Kufars, they were nothing but slaves and soon the became to be converted soldiers hired by many muslim empires such as the Afghan Samanid Army.
Among few of those slaves were like Alp-tagin, earning himself a great name. And besides as far as we know Facts and sources from Afghanistan, Persia, Arabs, Indians and even Chinese containing names of many Maga tribes which break the bones of this such foolish and childish theory.

I will give you an example: Ferdowsi clearly marks the Suris' whom are one of the large sub tribe of Ghalzais.

During the times of Khosrow Parviz A tribal leader name Suri from Khorasan made an uprise, and finally made to be as Governor since he was powerful enough to harm King Khosrow Parviz. When Khosrow Parviz was prisoned and killed by his own son Shirui. When Shirui died his young son Ardeshir III ruled, anyways still loyal old man Suri managed to get his hands off from another Afghan named Ghorazi (Most likely an Abadaliate) who killed King Ardeshir son of Shirui (Ardeshir III), at that moment Suri was smart and knew that Ghorazi would be killed and soon after two months Ghorazi was killed, by two princesses name Puran Dokht and Azarm Dokht. The rest of his man fled back to Afghanistan (Khorasan). The control was short and both princess gave control to Farrokhzad.

Still Suri only a Governor, It has been said that even during 9 months rule of Farrokhzad, and Suri was still alive and ruling as slave Governor, but his power was growing. However during the times of young man Yazdegerd III who was also grandson of Khorsow Parviz, Suri was long death and his tribe was united stronger then ever by Suri's son Mahuy Suri declared himself as king of Khorasan (Modern day Afghan land). Still Yazdegerd was a young weak king who had little control of his empires and most of the things were taken control by his uncles and his loyal vizers.

When message of Islam came from Mohammad (May peace be upon him) to king Yazdegerd III, he sends his general Son of Hormozd in command to take care of all this unworthy massage and thought of it nothing but a wind.

Anyways by the time when Arabs win the war and Sayd bin Wagas "invades Persia" 630s , takes over Persian capital, (Ctesiphon) in province of Khvvrvaran located in modern day of Iraq. Yazdegerd III runs away and reaches Khorasan, and send a later to king Mahuy Suri before reaching. But Mahuy Suri wanted to expand like any emperor, and like modern Afghans did not liked Iranians and so he plained to kill him, and take over his wealth and throne and soon he did and so Mahuy Suri becomes lord of not just Khorasan but also reaches border with province of Pars instate of attacking Iraq where Arabs were still new with their rules (I believe a peace deal may have been made with Arabs). Soon he turns and makes his way to Bokara, where he's then killed by Governor general of Bokara. It wasn't long before soon Islam reaches Afghanistan.

LOL for all we know of this theory about Quis has little frame with it, since it was written as a theory, and still up to this day, no prove or connection has been found to relate a population of 13-15 million Afghans with confusion years gaps in between to these Chinki Turks. LOL A Turkish prince named Hussein (A Muslim) raped Bibi Matorola daughter of Quis ?????who lived long and even meet Mohammad (May peace be upon him) gave birth to a son name Ghalzi???????????? LOL That Women must of beet 400 years or something to last until the Turks converted to Islam LOL THAT MUST BE GAZALI not GHALZAI LOL Lets see when Mohammad died Islam barely reached Afghanistan so how can we connect Turks with this time frame with yet the Turks were nothing but slaves and were mostly kufars until the end of Khilafa.

Ghalzais LOL = Turkics LOL What a stupidity. And besides I think people are confused with small Suljak tribes of Gazzali of Turkistan whom were muslims LOL Which means far beyond to connect with your theory.:yes: Good job thought, but still naive do you really think Ghalzais look Chinki? LOL and have flat nose? Well I don't know, but do me a favor dear, read some books. Its a good idea when facing history.

Farhad
12-28-2007, 04:28 PM
sAlaaamona!!!\

hey anyone have any information about the Hussain Khel tribe please let me know ???

Wazir are divided into two tribes, the Ahmadzai and Othmanzai. Hussain Khel is one of the main sub-clan of Ahmadzai and the other main sub clan of Ahmanzai is Kalokhel. Hussain Khel are closely related to The Wazir, Gurbaz and Lalawazir in the Kugiani in Nengahar and along the Safed Koh range. So they are usually described as being a tribe of Karlani Pashtuns.
Other place where Ahmadzai can be found is Paktia, Khost and Paktika and also in the Tribal area in the east of the Durand line.


The Wazir are mainly located in the two Tribal Area of North and South Waziristan. The Mehsud Tribe is also one of the main Tribe of the Waziristan.

knockout_artist
12-28-2007, 04:48 PM
farhad what about "tahir kheli" and "burki"

knockout_artist
12-28-2007, 04:55 PM
i didn't know ghazali/bangush were pashtoons. hmmm

Farhad
12-28-2007, 05:47 PM
farhad what about "tahir kheli" and "burki"



Tahirkheli History
In 1749 A.D Ahmad Shah Abdali (The ruler of Afghanistan) came to Peshawar. At that time Boland Khan, the son of Tahir Khan was the landlord of area called "Khare and Gandar" (Ref: Hayat-e-Afghani - written in 1867 by Hayat Khan page 184).

Tahir Khan acquired the land just before Ahmad Shah conqured it and as Ahmad Shah Abdali was happy with Boland Khan, he formally gave this land (Kharee, Gandgar and Hirro) to Boland Khan (Ref: Hayat-e-Afghani - written in 1867 by Hayat Khan page 185).

Tahir Khan belonged to the "ALLIZAI" tribe which is a sub tribe of "UTMAN ZAI". Therefore the Tahirkheli family tree starts as follows -



To View the Tahir kheli's Family Tree please visit here: http://www.tahirkhelis.com/family_tree/tree.htm

Farhad
12-28-2007, 05:54 PM
farhad what about "tahir kheli" and "burki"


I have to do much more home work on Burki, but I believe they are related to Niazi Tribe of Mianwali and Attock Area..

Most Famous Niazi is Imran Khan the greatest Cricket Player in the World

Selgy
12-28-2007, 06:27 PM
Wazir are divided into two tribes, the Ahmadzai and Othmanzai. Hussain Khel is one of the main sub-clan of Ahmadzai and the other main sub clan of Ahmanzai is Kalokhel. Hussain Khel are closely related to The Wazir, Gurbaz and Lalawazir in the Kugiani in Nengahar and along the Safed Koh range. So they are usually described as being a tribe of Karlani Pashtuns.
Other place where Ahmadzai can be found is Paktia, Khost and Paktika and also in the Tribal area in the east of the Durand line.


The Wazir are mainly located in the two Tribal Area of North and South Waziristan. The Mehsud Tribe is also one of the main Tribe of the Waziristan.

Salaam, Thanks a world dude, surely Allah j will reward you for your efforts.

Farhad
12-28-2007, 10:32 PM
Salaam, Thanks a world dude, surely Allah j will reward you for your efforts.


Salaam and you are most welcome.

Shaista
12-29-2007, 04:32 AM
Where is mandozai :(

Zanjeeeer
12-29-2007, 05:57 AM
can u guyz please stop this tribe thing .. chi faida we r all afghans man ... qawm qawm gofta kolle afghanistan kharab shod

Farhad
12-29-2007, 07:57 AM
Where is mandozai :(



Mandozai is one of the main Afghan Tribe in Khost Province bordering Tribal area in Pakistan. Mandozai belong to Ghilzai Pashtun just as other main tribes and Clan in Khost. There is another Mandozai which is located in Baluchistan. Ismael Khel, a Sub clan of Mandozai is well known for their support of Taliban in Khost Province.

Farhad
12-29-2007, 07:58 AM
can u guyz please stop this tribe thing .. chi faida we r all afghans man ... qawm qawm gofta kolle afghanistan kharab shod

No and if can't contribute then please leave without any comment. Thank You :)

Farhad
12-29-2007, 07:59 AM
i didn't know ghazali/bangush were pashtoons. hmmm

Indeed, They are and dont you just love it to come across such informations ?

ayesha
12-29-2007, 10:41 AM
dear farhad bro,
have u any information about kasi tribe. zamberyani and shirwani were the sons of kasi but kasi started from where?
thanks

Farhad
12-29-2007, 11:58 AM
dear farhad bro,
have u any information about kasi tribe. zamberyani and shirwani were the sons of kasi but kasi started from where?
thanks



Salam

Qais Abdul Rashid, The Father of Afghan had three sons. Sarban, Baitan and Ghourghusht.
Sarban later had two sons, Sharkhbun and Kharshbun. Kasi is the son of Kharshbun who later became the father of many tribes and Clans eg: Shinwari, Shirwani/Sherani.

The closest kindred to these tribes are of the eastern Afghans tribes of the eastern and the adjacent mountains to the north they are known as the Yusafzais, the Muhammadzai.


Ps: I have never heard of Zamberyani but I will con't to do some searching..

knockout_artist
12-29-2007, 12:03 PM
Indeed, They are and dont you just love it to come across such informations ?

yeah.
one question all the tribe you describe any of them non-pashtoon.
like uzbek-tajik-hazaras?

Farhad
12-29-2007, 12:08 PM
yeah.
one question all the tribe you describe any of them non-pashtoon.
like uzbek-tajik-hazaras?



No. These are all Afghan's Tribes and Clans. I doubt the Tajik, Uzbek or Hazara Encompass with Tribal System.

knockout_artist
12-29-2007, 01:20 PM
^ but does afghanistan not have uzbek/tajik/hazara population??
is that to you
afghan=pashtoon ?
then who are afghan nationals who are not pashtoons??

Farhad
12-29-2007, 01:28 PM
^ but does afghanistan not have uzbek/tajik/hazara population??
is that to you
afghan=pashtoon ?
then who are afghan nationals who are not pashtoons??


Pashtun = Afghan by Race

Tajik, Uzbek & Others = Afghan by birth & nationality


Ps: Dont confused with the Dari speaking Afghans because most of them are Afghan by Race but has adopted Farsi as thier main language...just as some Afghan in Paksitan has adopted Urdu and Hindko as thier language.

ayesha
12-30-2007, 04:16 AM
thanks brother,
i spelled itwrong it is zamariani. he was one the 12 sons of kasi.
plz refer some good books on the history of pkhtoons.

Farhad
12-30-2007, 05:13 AM
thanks brother,
i spelled itwrong it is zamariani. he was one the 12 sons of kasi.
plz refer some good books on the history of pkhtoons.



Salam and you are most welcome..


Ps: I like the lilac on your avatar

ayesha
12-31-2007, 11:25 AM
salam,
thanks, but do let me know about good books.

Farhad
01-01-2008, 04:46 PM
salam,
thanks, but do let me know about good books.

Please visit this site for the List of Books on Afghansitan


http://www.**********.com/books/books.html

https://www.vedamsbooks.com/afghan.htm


May be Orbal Khan might be able to help us on other books in his collections..


Ps: Hope admins won't delete the link of these site:)

Salomina
01-06-2008, 12:22 PM
Pashtun = Afghan by Race

Tajik, Uzbek & Others = Afghan by birth & nationality


Ps: Dont confused with the Dari speaking Afghans because most of them are Afghan by Race but has adopted Farsi as thier main language...just as some Afghan in Paksitan has adopted Urdu and Hindko as thier language.

Salom!
You a little bit are mistaken. Afghan = Pashtun yes, but only in Afghanistan.
Other ethnic groups, such as Tajik, Uzbeks, Hazaras. They are Afghani Tajik, Afghani Uzbeks and Afghani Hazaras.
1. Pushtun from Pakistan will not name itself the Afghan
2. Tajik from Tajikistan will not name itself the Afghan
3. Uzbek from Uzbekistan will not name itself the Afghan.
Besides, there is no such race as Afghan, only a nationality.
To which often confuse citizenship.
If you want define the Afghan race. You should know from what language in the original came the word Afghan,Also what is means?
In modern days can only identify Afghans by taking DNA taste.

Pashto Dreamer
01-06-2008, 03:18 PM
Salom!
You a little bit are mistaken. Afghan = Pashtun yes, but only in Afghanistan.
Other ethnic groups, such as Tajik, Uzbeks, Hazaras. They are Afghani Tajik, Afghani Uzbeks and Afghani Hazaras.
1. Pushtun from Pakistan will not name itself the Afghan
2. Tajik from Tajikistan will not name itself the Afghan
3. Uzbek from Uzbekistan will not name itself the Afghan.
Besides, there is no such race as Afghan, only a nationality.
To which often confuse citizenship.
If you want define the Afghan race. You should know from what language in the original came the word Afghan,Also what is means?
In modern days can only identify Afghans by taking DNA taste.

wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!
like it or not if u pashtoon u afghan!

Salomina
01-07-2008, 11:58 AM
wrong!!!!!!!!!!!!
like it or not if u pashtoon u afghan!

This slogan " like it or not if u pashtoon u afghan! " This all that you can tell? Discussion at a level of a kindergarten?
You want it or not, but sit on two chairs can nobody. Pushtun from territory of Pakistan cannot name itself Afghan.
For the beginning they need the Afghani citizenship. In the second to pay taxes as all citizens of Afghanistan. In the third to serve in the Afghani army. And then to deserve a rank of the Afghan. One of many problems of Afghanistan today, that Pushtuns from Pakistan can not decide who they are :confused1:

Farhad
01-07-2008, 03:38 PM
This slogan " like it or not if u pashtoon u afghan! " This all that you can tell? Discussion at a level of a kindergarten?
You want it or not, but sit on two chairs can nobody. Pushtun from territory of Pakistan cannot name itself Afghan.
For the beginning they need the Afghani citizenship. In the second to pay taxes as all citizens of Afghanistan. In the third to serve in the Afghani army. And then to deserve a rank of the Afghan. One of many problems of Afghanistan today, that Pushtuns from Pakistan can not decide who they are :confused1:

One to say other's level of discussion at the Kindergarten level is kinda lame when that person himself ignoring the actual fact.


Every Nation are named after the Indigenous people.

As you've mention the Tajik of Tajikisitan will not called themselves Afghan or the Uzbek of Uzbekistan wouldn't either. Did you ever consider thinking why is that ? and why is it the Tajik and Uzbek in Afghanistan are called Afghan ? Those Tajik & Uzbek in thier Respectives homeland would not called themselves Afghan becasue they do not belong to Afghan Race yet the same people in Afghanistan would becasue it is thier nationality. They are Citizen of Afghanistan and they are entitle to be called Afghans.

But why is it Afghan ? who are the Afghans ? Remember most countries are name after the Indigenous people. allow me to give you some examples : Malaysia is named after the Malays, Germany after Germans, England after the English and so is Afghanistan after the Afghans just as the Tajikistan after the Tajik and Uzbekistan after the Uzbeg.

The name Afghan belong to those who speak Pashto, who are also called Pashtun , Pakhtun or Pathan( After the language they speak) Afghan is the race and this entirely belong to whose origin are Pashto speaking people. Not to dispute that most Afghans have adopted other languages eg: Dari, Farsi, Urdu or Turkic but thier blood are still an Afghan Blood and by that no matter where do they live they will always belong to a Race of Afghans.

As you mention that the Afghan is Pakistan does not have the right to be called Afghans and yet your explanation is flaw. If you've been to the Paksitan and had taken a look at the ID card of the Pashtun/Pathan/Pakhtun then you will see on thier ID card the race stated on it is " Qaum e Afghan" Not Pashtun, Not Pakhtun.

They forever will be an Afghan and no one have the Right to deny them thier birth right as Afghan race. ( You can deny them the Afghan Citizenship but not the Race). On my ID Card also stated "Bangsa Afghan" Means " Afghan Race" A Chinese born in German will always be a Chinese and an Afghan born anywhere in this world will always be an Afghan race though he will not have the Afghansitan's Citizenship.

This Thread is About the Afghan Tribes and if you need to Continue to discuss more about this then we can do it in another Thread.

I thank you in advance.

Salomina
01-08-2008, 11:34 AM
One to say other's level of discussion at the Kindergarten level is kinda lame when that person himself ignoring the actual fact.


Every Nation are named after the Indigenous people.

As you've mention the Tajik of Tajikisitan will not called themselves Afghan or the Uzbek of Uzbekistan wouldn't either. Did you ever consider thinking why is that ? and why is it the Tajik and Uzbek in Afghanistan are called Afghan ? Those Tajik & Uzbek in thier Respectives homeland would not called themselves Afghan becasue they do not belong to Afghan Race yet the same people in Afghanistan would becasue it is thier nationality. They are Citizen of Afghanistan and they are entitle to be called Afghans.

But why is it Afghan ? who are the Afghans ? Remember most countries are name after the Indigenous people. allow me to give you some examples : Malaysia is named after the Malays, Germany after Germans, England after the English and so is Afghanistan after the Afghans just as the Tajikistan after the Tajik and Uzbekistan after the Uzbeg.

The name Afghan belong to those who speak Pashto, who are also called Pashtun , Pakhtun or Pathan( After the language they speak) Afghan is the race and this entirely belong to whose origin are Pashto speaking people. Not to dispute that most Afghans have adopted other languages eg: Dari, Farsi, Urdu or Turkic but thier blood are still an Afghan Blood and by that no matter where do they live they will always belong to a Race of Afghans.

As you mention that the Afghan is Pakistan does not have the right to be called Afghans and yet your explanation is flaw. If you've been to the Paksitan and had taken a look at the ID card of the Pashtun/Pathan/Pakhtun then you will see on thier ID card the race stated on it is " Qaum e Afghan" Not Pashtun, Not Pakhtun.

They forever will be an Afghan and no one have the Right to deny them thier birth right as Afghan race. ( You can deny them the Afghan Citizenship but not the Race). On my ID Card also stated "Bangsa Afghan" Means " Afghan Race" A Chinese born in German will always be a Chinese and an Afghan born anywhere in this world will always be an Afghan race though he will not have the Afghansitan's Citizenship.

This Thread is About the Afghan Tribes and if you need to Continue to discuss more about this then we can do it in another Thread.

I thank you in advance.

That you speak that is not the fact too.
You give an example the different countries. I want too:)
Look, the Tadjiks live in Russia. Many of them assimilated. They are named by Russian Tadjiks. They were born in Russia, they have a Russian citizenship. The native language Russian. Ethnically they Tadjiks but citizenship at them Russian. Therefore they Russian Tadjiks. It for example. Anything personal against Tadjiks I not have .
You agree that residing at Russia does not do Tadjiks Russian?
Then Tadjiks why living in Afghanistan you define as Afghans?
They the Afghani Tadjiks. With citizenship. But they cannot be ethnic Afghans.
I agree with that that Pushtun is Afghan . I do not agree with definitions.
Everyone define this as wants. And the essence is not present.

If to speak scientific language on which system the nations and races are defined all.
As to Afghans as ethnic group. Here there is a problem. All Pushtuns different. Different DNA. That carries you as nation to different races.
I once again shall repeat such term as Afghans the race does not exist in the nature and in a science. I suggest to familiarize, please look. http://racialreality.110mb.com/
I do not belong to Pushtuns and to Afghanistan. I simply understand from personal acquaintance with Pushtuns. Why the some people are externally similar to persians, pakistanies, Italians, caucasus, Jews at last. Why externally all of you of different nationalities. But consider itself as one people moreover and one race. So cannot be.

It will be interesting to me to read through that new to my self. As to learn at last. What is or who such was Afghan that in honour of it have named the nation and the country?

All blessings

ORBAL
01-08-2008, 04:24 PM
Salom!
You a little bit are mistaken. Afghan = Pashtun yes, but only in Afghanistan.
Other ethnic groups, such as Tajik, Uzbeks, Hazaras. They are Afghani Tajik, Afghani Uzbeks and Afghani Hazaras.
1. Pushtun from Pakistan will not name itself the Afghan
2. Tajik from Tajikistan will not name itself the Afghan
3. Uzbek from Uzbekistan will not name itself the Afghan.
Besides, there is no such race as Afghan, only a nationality.
To which often confuse citizenship.
If you want define the Afghan race. You should know from what language in the original came the word Afghan,Also what is means?
In modern days can only identify Afghans by taking DNA taste.

I was going to take the effort to counter your post in a more intelligible way but it seem your intellectual inclination doesn’t warrant that. Instead I thought of an emotional remedy:

Pull out your sword and slay any one, that says Pashton and Afghan are not one! Arabs know this and so do Romans: Afghans are Pashtons, Pashtons are Afghans!

[K. Khattak]

Farhad
01-08-2008, 07:59 PM
I was going to take the effort to counter your post in a more intelligible way but it seem your intellectual inclination doesn’t warrant that. Instead I thought of an emotional remedy:

Pull out your sword and slay any one, that says Pashton and Afghan are not one! Arabs know this and so do Romans: Afghans are Pashtons, Pashtons are Afghans![K. Khattak]



Allow me to add the years of Khushal Khan Khattak, Born 1613 - Died 1691

Hazok
01-08-2008, 09:24 PM
hey idk if anybody could help me, but i guess im just trying to trace my roots and see what tribe/ or what part of the country I am. Father and mother born and raised in kabul, but couple generations back are traced to istalef, grandfather's name was fazilhaq, my last name is fazli, so im guessing somewhere around there, but i really have no idea.

if anybody could help it'd be greatly appreciated.

Selgy
01-09-2008, 01:39 AM
Wazir are divided into two tribes, the Ahmadzai and Othmanzai. Hussain Khel is one of the main sub-clan of Ahmadzai and the other main sub clan of Ahmanzai is Kalokhel. Hussain Khel are closely related to The Wazir, Gurbaz and Lalawazir in the Kugiani in Nengahar and along the Safed Koh range. So they are usually described as being a tribe of Karlani Pashtuns.
Other place where Ahmadzai can be found is Paktia, Khost and Paktika and also in the Tribal area in the east of the Durand line.


The Wazir are mainly located in the two Tribal Area of North and South Waziristan. The Mehsud Tribe is also one of the main Tribe of the Waziristan.

Salaam, hey Brother, you told me that Hussain Khel is the main clan of Ahmadzai, but when i asked at home they said that Hussain Khel is part of Arabs that came afghanistan, and are mostly religous people and people of afghanistan ( mostly provinces) respect them like they do same with the Sayeds, so what is the fact ???

Salomina
01-09-2008, 04:36 AM
I was going to take the effort to counter your post in a more intelligible way but it seem your intellectual inclination doesn’t warrant that. Instead I thought of an emotional remedy:

Pull out your sword and slay any one, that says Pashton and Afghan are not one! Arabs know this and so do Romans: Afghans are Pashtons, Pashtons are Afghans!

[K. Khattak]

I do not know what to answer such posts. To argue with you on a level of intellectuality? To answer something insulting back?
It is silly. As was silly to write about my intellectuality if you have not understood my post.

More than once I heard this slogan. But it was for a long time and today a reality it another.
All of you write that " Pashton is Afghan ". But anybody from you does not know why.
Anybody from you does not know that such or who such Afghan? I mean historically, what this word means?
Also what word Pashton means?

ORBAL
01-09-2008, 06:06 AM
I do not know what to answer such posts. To argue with you on a level of intellectuality? To answer something insulting back?
It is silly. As was silly to write about my intellectuality if you have not understood my post.

More than once I heard this slogan. But it was for a long time and today a reality it another.
All of you write that " Pashton is Afghan ". But anybody from you does not know why.
Anybody from you does not know that such or who such Afghan? I mean historically, what this word means?
Also what word Pashton means?


Salomina I know you have trouble expressing yourself in proper English but that is ok if your posts were factually correct! So before anything else, can you plz tell us whether you’re a serious researcher with proper credentials or just a layman trying to stir people? If you think you have proper credentials please let us know so I can shed more lights on and try and answer the questions you posed.

kHaiiSta
01-09-2008, 06:23 AM
I do not know what to answer such posts. To argue with you on a level of intellectuality? To answer something insulting back?
It is silly. As was silly to write about my intellectuality if you have not understood my post.

More than once I heard this slogan. But it was for a long time and today a reality it another.
All of you write that " Pashton is Afghan ". But anybody from you does not know why.
Anybody from you does not know that such or who such Afghan? I mean historically, what this word means?
Also what word Pashton means?

since we don't know, you might as well tell us...:)

Salomina
01-09-2008, 10:18 AM
Salomina I know you have trouble expressing yourself in proper English but that is ok if your posts were factually correct! So before anything else, can you plz tell us whether you’re a serious researcher with proper credentials or just a layman trying to stir people? If you think you have proper credentials please let us know so I can shed more lights on and try and answer the questions you posed.
Each country has a name, it is translated on other languages. For example the name of the country Argentina has come from the word "silver".
Lebanon from " white mountains ". Serbia from the word "mountain ash". Austria from " east kingdom ".
I the fan of history. Probably my English language is not so clear. But my questions are very simple. If you know English language and history of Afghanistan............

So to me it is not clear. Why I the third time ask the same question?:blink:

Salomina
01-09-2008, 10:32 AM
since we don't know, you might as well tell us...:)
I not the teacher.
It is interesting to hear from you.:) Simply it wanted to communicate. I have shown my point of view. So discussion has begun. :)

Farhad
01-09-2008, 01:39 PM
Each country has a name, it is translated on other languages. For example the name of the country Argentina has come from the word "silver".
Lebanon from " white mountains ". Serbia from the word "mountain ash". Austria from " east kingdom ".
I the fan of history. Probably my English language is not so clear. But my questions are very simple. If you know English language and history of Afghanistan............

So to me it is not clear. Why I the third time ask the same question?:blink:


Afghanistan = Land of the People of Afghan Race.


Pashtun/Pakhtun/Pathan = People of Afghan Race and this 3 names are given to them after the Language they speak.


Some country's name cannot be translated but we just understood it.

ORBAL
01-09-2008, 10:24 PM
Each country has a name, it is translated on other languages. For example the name of the country Argentina has come from the word "silver".
Lebanon from " white mountains ". Serbia from the word "mountain ash". Austria from " east kingdom ".
I the fan of history. Probably my English language is not so clear. But my questions are very simple. If you know English language and history of Afghanistan............

So to me it is not clear. Why I the third time ask the same question?:blink:

What language do you speak?

Salomina
01-10-2008, 01:22 AM
Afghanistan = Land of the People of Afghan Race.


Pashtun/Pakhtun/Pathan = People of Afghan Race and this 3 names are given to them after the Language they speak.


Some country's name cannot be translated but we just understood it.

Dear Farhad, the term “Afghan race” not exist.
Read about 2 social sciences.
Anthropology is the human being.
Etymology is the study of the history of words.

The race is only classification of human beings.
Read about it, so you will be convinced. Classifications as”Afghan race” does not exist.
I sorry, but it is the fact.

I personally read 3 versions etymology of “Afghanistan”. Nobody knows what correct.
I quote you “Some country's name cannot be translated but we just understood it”
Each word has the roots in any language.
I liked one of versions. “Upa-Ghana-Stan” It means “ the ground of the incorporated tribes”
But I do not know pashtu. I do not know if the correct.:)

Salomina
01-10-2008, 01:31 AM
What language do you speak?
And then you will ask me what colour of my eyes.
But never will you answer my question.

Pashto Dreamer
01-10-2008, 04:52 AM
And then you will ask me what colour of my eyes.
But never will you answer my question.

another desifies pakified pashtun! goodness after only 60 yrs u guys have been totaly brainwashed.... ur ancestors didnt take crap frm any1 yet 60 yrs of pakiland and ur all desified! :D

Pashto Dreamer
01-10-2008, 06:19 AM
btw i am khattak pashtun and am frm NWFP!!!!!!! or should dat be pukhtunkhwa lol

Salomina
01-10-2008, 06:20 AM
another desifies pakified pashtun! goodness after only 60 yrs u guys have been totaly brainwashed.... ur ancestors didnt take crap frm any1 yet 60 yrs of pakiland and ur all desified! :D

It not about me. I not from Pakistan, also I do not belong to hindo iranian race....
I not brainwashed.
Brain washed that person who has the wrong Impression about me.
I did not get my education from Pakistan madrasa. :angry:

Pashto Dreamer
01-10-2008, 07:06 AM
then the question arises are u pashtun?

Salomina
01-10-2008, 07:40 AM
No

ORBAL
01-10-2008, 03:24 PM
And then you will ask me what colour of my eyes.
But never will you answer my question.

No, I don’t care what color eyes you have! The reason why I asked you was so you can express yourself in whatever language you speak best because I can hardly follow your incoherent gibberish in English. So either express yourself in an intelligent way or stop making fun of yourself. There is no point me quoting tons of literature to prove you wrong when you can’t comprehend in English!

Pashto Dreamer
01-10-2008, 03:30 PM
No, I don’t care what color eyes you have! The reason why I asked you was so you can express yourself in whatever language you speak best because I can hardly follow your incoherent gibberish in English. So either express yourself in an intelligent way or stop making fun of yourself. There is no point me quoting tons of literature to prove you wrong when you can’t comprehend in English!

ur mean! lol not every1 has english as a 1st language or grew up in an english spking country

ORBAL
01-10-2008, 03:36 PM
ur mean! lol not every1 has english as a 1st language or grew up in an english spking country

No, I am thinking that the person might be speaking other European languages such as German or Dutch etc so I can refer him/her to appropriate sources when I quote. I know the question of English is irrelevant in everyday talk but when it comes to understanding complex jargon or reading literature one must be able to grasp it. Otherwise there is no point me quoting.

Pashto Dreamer
01-10-2008, 03:45 PM
No, I am thinking that the person might be speaking other European languages such as German or Dutch etc so I can refer him/her to appropriate sources when I quote. I know the question of English is irrelevant in everyday talk but when it comes to understanding complex jargon or reading literature one must be able to grasp it. Otherwise there is no point me quoting.

lol suppose so :) btw wht tribe u frm?

Angoor
01-10-2008, 03:54 PM
I dont think this salomina guy even knows himself what he is arguing about let alone be able to make us understand no matter what language he speaks.

ORBAL
01-10-2008, 03:54 PM
lol suppose so :) btw wht tribe u frm?

If I could change one thing for Pashtun would be to get rid of the tribes and unite them under one tribe and under one banner - the great tribe of “Afghan”! This was the dream of Ahmad Shah Baba as well as Khushal Baba.

But to answer your question, both my mother and father are Popal and originally from Karz of Kandahar.

Salomina
01-11-2008, 11:58 AM
No, I don’t care what color eyes you have! The reason why I asked you was so you can express yourself in whatever language you speak best because I can hardly follow your incoherent gibberish in English. So either express yourself in an intelligent way or stop making fun of yourself. There is no point me quoting tons of literature to prove you wrong when you can’t comprehend in English!

I have only asked you, what means the word Afghan? Why Farhad has understood my English? And you are not.
Its simply problem with you! Because you just can’t answer to my question.
English tongue it’s not my mother tongue and yours. Also I do not speak either dalpaki language or Pashto.

Salomina
01-11-2008, 11:58 AM
I dont think this salomina guy even knows himself what he is arguing about let alone be able to make us understand no matter what language he speaks.

First of all I am not the guy; secondly your way of the thinking looks like very primitive old lady.
You don’t know me and don’t judge people without knowing them.

Yerpon
01-12-2008, 05:05 AM
Farhada ddera sha chaar de wukrra. Manëna wrora.

ORBAL
01-12-2008, 06:05 AM
I have only asked you, what means the word Afghan? Why Farhad has understood my English? And you are not.
Its simply problem with you! Because you just can’t answer to my question.
English tongue it’s not my mother tongue and yours. Also I do not speak either dalpaki language or Pashto.


I have only asked you, what means the word Afghan? Why Farhad has understood my English? And you are not. Its simply problem with you! Because you just can’t answer to my question.

I understood you too but the problem is that you need to be familiar with the abc of linguistics, morphology of names and words, and basic anthropology. That’s why I first asked for your credentials and then asked you to see which other language you speak. But obviously you're a layman. This is why I think you need good command in English language to make sense of literature and be able to argue your point in a concise manner.


Because you just can’t answer to my question.
English tongue it’s not my mother tongue and yours. Also I do not speak either dalpaki language or Pashto.

Ok, here is something for you to read and let me know what you think:


Afghan evidently derives from Sanskrit Ashvaka or Ashvakan (q.v),
the Assakenois of Arrian[1]. This view was propounded by scholars like
Dr Christian Lassen, J. W. McCrindle [2] etc and has been supported by
numerous modern scholars [3] [4] [1]. In Sanskrit, word ashva (Iranian
aspa, Prakrit assa) means "horse", and ashvaka (Prakrit assaka)
means "horseman". Pre-Christian times knew the people of
eastern Afghanistan as Ashvakas (horsemen), since they raised a fine
breed of horses and had a reputation for providing expert cavalrymen.
The fifth-century-BCE Indian grammarian Panini calls them Ashvakayana

Read the rest here:

THE ORIGIN OF "AFGHAN" (http://www.hinduwebsite.com/history/afghan_name.asp)

Salomina
01-13-2008, 05:56 AM
Orbal, stop lecture to me! I have not come to this forum to listen useless information’s.

About what you recommended me to read.
In the firs it’s old news. It can be found in many sites of the Internet. It’s very strange that you have chosen the Hindu website to show me. Why you should recommend me the Hindu website but not Afghan website? You are representing Afghanistan not India.

“By blood, we are immersed in love of you.
The youth lose their heads for your sake.
I come to you and my heart finds rest.
Away from you, grief clings to my heart like a snake.
I forget the throne of Delhi
when I remember the mountain tops of my Afghan land.
If I must choose between the world and you,
I shall not hesitate to claim your barren deserts as my own.”
Ahmad Shah Durrani
I am not interesting about other countries theory and meanings.
I am interested only by Afghan publishers.

Article are collection all theories. Are you thinking the facts are is not present? Why you have chosen this theory about horses? Why Norwegian orientalist Lassen it is convincing for you?:confused1:

Yerpon
01-13-2008, 08:33 AM
Well, I think most of the times "Afghan" refers to Pashtuns. But on few occasions it is a term used for the east Iranians - Pashtuns, Tajiks and the others (eg. Pamiris, Nuristanis, Kashmiris, etc.).

Angoor
01-13-2008, 01:35 PM
First of all I am not the guy; secondly your way of the thinking looks like very primitive old lady.
You don’t know me and don’t judge people without knowing them.

keep ur hair on. Dont b so uptight. im just having fun with ya.

ORBAL
01-13-2008, 03:27 PM
Orbal, stop lecture to me! I have not come to this forum to listen useless information’s.

About what you recommended me to read.
In the firs it’s old news. It can be found in many sites of the Internet. It’s very strange that you have chosen the Hindu website to show me. Why you should recommend me the Hindu website but not Afghan website? You are representing Afghanistan not India.

“By blood, we are immersed in love of you.
The youth lose their heads for your sake.
I come to you and my heart finds rest.
Away from you, grief clings to my heart like a snake.
I forget the throne of Delhi
when I remember the mountain tops of my Afghan land.
If I must choose between the world and you,
I shall not hesitate to claim your barren deserts as my own.”
Ahmad Shah Durrani
I am not interesting about other countries theory and meanings.
I am interested only by Afghan publishers.

Article are collection all theories. Are you thinking the facts are is not present? Why you have chosen this theory about horses? Why Norwegian orientalist Lassen it is convincing for you?:confused1:


I think I am debating a retard here! Forget anthropology, you urgently need to attend classes designed for those with special needs such the one with down-syndrome!

Pashto Dreamer
01-13-2008, 03:29 PM
I think I am debating a retard here! Forget anthropology, you urgently need to attend classes designed for those with special needs such the one with down-syndrome!

yesh!!!!!
lol u r cruel.... no need 2 insult :)

ORBAL
01-13-2008, 04:11 PM
^^

This is the only way to put sense in the minds of dull individuals. The question is about the origin of the word “Afghan”. He/she first comes with loads of statements and questions. It would take me months to start anthropological lessons about how human societies go through certain changes and how names come to beings when we trace their morphology. This is why I asked this person if he/she know any other European language so I can quote. Without knowing the principles and basic in a clear language, it would be like me going like merry-go round and round and talking to a brick wall.

ORBAL
01-13-2008, 04:11 PM
...

ORBAL
01-13-2008, 04:12 PM
^^

This is the only way to put sense in the minds of dull individuals. The question is about the origin of the word “Afghan”. He/she first comes with loads of statements and questions. It would take me months to start anthropological lessons about how human societies go through certain changes and how names come to beings when we trace their morphology. This is why I asked this person if he/she know any other European languages so I can quote. Without knowing the principles and basic in a clear language, it would be like me going like merry-go round and round and talking to a brick wall.

Salomina
01-14-2008, 05:42 AM
I think I am debating a retard here! Forget anthropology, you urgently need to attend classes designed for those with special needs such the one with down-syndrome!
O yes. Continue to cover yours Dyslexia with such stupid behaviour. Down syndrome it’s about you. You have all the symptoms. Probably as the person you have Intellectual limitation. You do not understand the simple subject. Also, that you recommended me to read, probably not in your power to understand. And you are even not capable to explain yours point of view. So stop to rape your brain.
I know even for monkey it’s possible to learn to use the computer.
Before the conversation with you I thought that it simply gossips.
Conclusion is one. You understand nothing about anthropology, etymology and history of Afghanistan. So stop to spend my time with nonsense.
You are the small, silly boy. Dioti zoya!http://s9.rimg.info/4b435ec34fd661a2adf282dbbc23872f.gif (http://smiles.rc-mir.com/smile.92177.html)
I fill sorry for people like you. Go back to school.
I know Afghani people. The Afghani man will not offend the woman because they have an honour. But it is not about you and not about the pashtun clown, pardons a dreamer………

ORBAL
01-14-2008, 04:19 PM
O yes. Continue to cover yours Dyslexia with such stupid behaviour. Down syndrome it’s about you. You have all the symptoms. Probably as the person you have Intellectual limitation. You do not understand the simple subject. Also, that you recommended me to read, probably not in your power to understand. And you are even not capable to explain yours point of view. So stop to rape your brain.
I know even for monkey it’s possible to learn to use the computer.
Before the conversation with you I thought that it simply gossips.
Conclusion is one. You understand nothing about anthropology, etymology and history of Afghanistan. So stop to spend my time with nonsense.
You are the small, silly boy. Dioti zoya!http://s9.rimg.info/4b435ec34fd661a2adf282dbbc23872f.gif (http://smiles.rc-mir.com/smile.92177.html)
I fill sorry for people like you. Go back to school.
I know Afghani people. The Afghani man will not offend the woman because they have an honour. But it is not about you and not about the pashtun clown, pardons a dreamer………


I fill sorry for people like you.


You shouldn’t “fill” for people! :o

There is no point me wasting time with you. This thread is for Afghans who’d want to know more about their family tree. Unless you want to contribute something positive, there is no reason for you to flood this tread with trash.

AfghanResistance
06-29-2008, 07:22 AM
salam all brothers. i were doing some research on the yusufzai tribe and i stumbled upon this forum. ive registered with the forum just because i love this tread in particular, specificly what FARHAD e mehtaab has contributed. may Allah reward you for your efforts.

Im from the major tribe of the yusufzai from both sides of my parents.
Im from the major sub tribe of nikpi khel from both sides of my parents once again and
Im from the minor sub tribe of khoidad khel from my fathers side and from the minor sub tribe of khushal khel from my mothers side.

i wonder if anyone can help me out, maybe you brother farhad.
im looking for more about the yusufzai tribe. i read in the britannica encyclopedea a while back that the mughal tribe feared the powerful yusufzai's, for they were not only a major force resisting the mughals but also politically influencing their neighbours the gilzais in terms of fighting the mughals.

it said that the elders of the yusufzai were called to a jirga in order to come to a peace deal and compromise. They asked them to come without any weapens and as the talks went on the yusufzai elders were all killed. The remaining tribe of the yusufzai knowing that they were the only tribe in danger for resisting puposes at the time they had no option but to migrate.

what ive mentioned above is from the top of my head from reading some literature some years back. can any one give me the full details or correct me where ive gone wrong.

thanks in advance for all replies

lughmani
07-11-2008, 09:14 AM
i am from balakot (mansehra). you didnt mention us in swatis subclan.
lughmani

Omaid
07-11-2008, 09:45 AM
salam all brothers. i were doing some research on the yusufzai tribe and i stumbled upon this forum. ive registered with the forum just because i love this tread in particular, specificly what FARHAD e mehtaab has contributed. may Allah reward you for your efforts.

Im from the major tribe of the yusufzai from both sides of my parents.
Im from the major sub tribe of nikpi khel from both sides of my parents once again and
Im from the minor sub tribe of khoidad khel from my fathers side and from the minor sub tribe of khushal khel from my mothers side.

i wonder if anyone can help me out, maybe you brother farhad.
im looking for more about the yusufzai tribe. i read in the britannica encyclopedea a while back that the mughal tribe feared the powerful yusufzai's, for they were not only a major force resisting the mughals but also politically influencing their neighbours the gilzais in terms of fighting the mughals.

it said that the elders of the yusufzai were called to a jirga in order to come to a peace deal and compromise. They asked them to come without any weapens and as the talks went on the yusufzai elders were all killed. The remaining tribe of the yusufzai knowing that they were the only tribe in danger for resisting puposes at the time they had no option but to migrate.

what ive mentioned above is from the top of my head from reading some literature some years back. can any one give me the full details or correct me where ive gone wrong.

thanks in advance for all replies

Migrate from where?

AfghanResistance
07-11-2008, 10:01 AM
Migrate from where?

the yusufzai's from kandahar, they conquered the swat vally and the surrounding vacinity from the the original inhabitants of afghans who call themselves swati's. they live if im correct around the hazara areas of the nwfp.

bijoux27
07-11-2008, 10:45 AM
Thanks this is some really interesting information. :)

QnzJ
01-04-2010, 02:08 PM
Interesting thread
I am Hindko speaking Pathan (Jadoon) from Pakistan.

Jadoon is a Pashtun tribe. They are very patriotic by nature and they sacrifice their lives for the sake of their beloved country.They live in the districts of Abbottabad and Swabi of N.W.F.P of Pakistan. Their spoken language is Pashto in Swabi and mostly Hindko in Abbottabad. Jadoons were freedom fighters and they showed bravery against their rivals, especially the Sikhs and the British with other prominent Pashtun tribes of the region like Swati, Tareens and Mashwanis. Jadoons leader Sakhi Jan Jadoon has been martyred during the freedom efforts against the Sikhs in the 18th century. Jadoons captured lower hazara (Haripur,Abbottabad) in 18th century and settled there. They are divided into two great clans namely Salar and Mansoor.

Shams1
01-04-2010, 02:58 PM
^^witch beloved country they fought for.

sabir
01-04-2010, 05:15 PM
Interesting thread
I am Hindko speaking Pathan (Jadoon) from Pakistan.

Jadoon is a Pashtun tribe. They are very patriotic by nature and they sacrifice their lives for the sake of their beloved country.They live in the districts of Abbottabad and Swabi of N.W.F.P of Pakistan. Their spoken language is Pashto in Swabi and mostly Hindko in Abbottabad. Jadoons were freedom fighters and they showed bravery against their rivals, especially the Sikhs and the British with other prominent Pashtun tribes of the region like Swati, Tareens and Mashwanis. Jadoons leader Sakhi Jan Jadoon has been martyred during the freedom efforts against the Sikhs in the 18th century. Jadoons captured lower hazara (Haripur,Abbottabad) in 18th century and settled there. They are divided into two great clans namely Salar and Mansoor.

Do you know the meaning behind the word "Pathan"?

UmarUmar
01-04-2010, 05:18 PM
^^

Haze, can you tell me who made Khushal Khan Khattak the national poet of Afghanistan?

Pashto Dreamer
01-05-2010, 02:06 AM
^ I think hes just been regarded as the national poet....

Phoebus Apollo
01-06-2010, 10:38 AM
I'm a Mohmand :)....Mohmands also live in Logar because my family is from there, but there isn't a big community of them. Do you know that Rahman Baba, the great poet, was a Mohmand and so was the first Afghan, Abdul Ahad Mohmand, who ever went to space?

Thaumaturge
01-06-2010, 01:20 PM
Duniya?:worried:

UmarUmar
01-06-2010, 01:46 PM
Duniya?:worried:

I'll go one step futher. Im from the universe. ;)

sabir
01-06-2010, 07:31 PM
I'm a Mohmand :)....Mohmands also live in Logar because my family is from there, but there isn't a big community of them. Do you know that Rahman Baba, the great poet, was a Mohmand and so was the first Afghan, Abdul Ahad Mohmand, who ever went to space?

I knew about Abdul Ahad, And wow.

Can you speak Pashto? What kind of dialogue do you guys have?

UmarUmar
01-06-2010, 07:37 PM
since everyone else has said this tribe thing I will get it out of the way as well.

I am mixed Hotak (father) and Tokhi (mother). 100% Ghilzai. lived all over afghanistan. kunduz, mazar, jalalabad. Currently Kabul.

Ghilzai Brap Brap. hehe

Phoebus Apollo
01-06-2010, 09:20 PM
My dad can speak Pashto. I also knew Pashto because I lived in Peshawar as a refugee for 9 years. Now, that I have been here in Canada for like 10 years, I remember very little Pashto. I think Mohmands speak Northern Pashto but I am not sure. Durand Line has divided Mohmand territory in half..The areas of the Mohmand agency being in Pakistan while the rest in Afghanistan.

UmarUmar, I heard Ghilzai's are of Turkish descent. They came from Central Asia in the 10th century. IS that true because most Pashtuns are supposedly descended from Aryans and are Indo-European. I read in a book that both Yusufzais and Ghilzais are descended from Turks.

sabir
01-06-2010, 10:25 PM
My dad can speak Pashto. I also knew Pashto because I lived in Peshawar as a refugee for 9 years. Now, that I have been here in Canada for like 10 years, I remember very little Pashto. I think Mohmands speak Northern Pashto but I am not sure. Durand Line has divided Mohmand territory in half..The areas of the Mohmand agency being in Pakistan while the rest in Afghanistan.

UmarUmar, I heard Ghilzai's are of Turkish descent. They came from Central Asia in the 10th century. IS that true because most Pashtuns are supposedly descended from Aryans and are Indo-European. I read in a book that both Yusufzais and Ghilzais are descended from Turks.

Pashtuns are claimed by everyone, everyone you meet say we are part of them.

From the Greek,Lost tribes of Israel,Iran,Turk,Aryan etc.

FatimaJaan
01-06-2010, 10:51 PM
I think I had told Misz I would share these in another thread, well here ya go, enjoy:

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h241/wafysworld86/abdali.jpg
http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h241/wafysworld86/ghilzai.jpg

There was one more page but I can't seem to find it now, aah well.

Algazel
01-07-2010, 08:30 AM
A question:

Why are there tribes among Pashtuns? I mean, at the beginning, probably each ethnic group lived in tribes, but later on, as they were urbanized, they left off their tribal distinctions. So why do Pashtuns take their tribal relationship very serious until now? I think calling oneself a Pahstun, is already enough, no need for making small tribal separations. They all have exactly the same culture and exactly the same language (though some very minor dialectal differences from region to region, but overall it is the same).

The question might sound a bit ridiculous, but it just came to my mind and i didn't know the reason.

.

sabir
01-07-2010, 09:18 AM
A question:

Why are there tribes among Pashtuns? I mean, at the beginning, probably each ethnic group lived in tribes, but later on, as they were urbanized, they left off their tribal distinctions. So why do Pashtuns take their tribal relationship very serious until now? I think calling oneself a Pahstun, is already enough, no need for making small tribal separations. They all have exactly the same culture and exactly the same language (though some very minor dialectal differences from region to region, but overall it is the same).

The question might sound a bit ridiculous, but it just came to my mind and i didn't know the reason.

.
Each tribe has its own unique History that contributes to the overall Pashtun history. Some are famous for being leaders while conquering parts of present day India,Persia and building the Afghan empire etc. But me personally, I believe in unification.



But usually, a Pashtun would not tell a non-Pashtun " I am a Karzai" or " I am a Mohmand". This tribal talk usually begins when a Pashtun meets one another. That's when the tribal bonanza initiates, especially in the Pashtun heartlands. In Quetta for example, If you are a "Noorzai" or "Achakzai" etc, non-Pashtuns are automatically shaking cause they know how large that tribe is and what they are capable of doing in Quetta and etc.

SALLAHUDIN
01-07-2010, 09:20 AM
A question:

Why are there tribes among Pashtuns? I mean, at the beginning, probably each ethnic group lived in tribes, but later on, as they were urbanized, they left off their tribal distinctions. So why do Pashtuns take their tribal relationship very serious until now? I think calling oneself a Pahstun, is already enough, no need for making small tribal separations. They all have exactly the same culture and exactly the same language (though some very minor dialectal differences from region to region, but overall it is the same).

The question might sound a bit ridiculous, but it just came to my mind and i didn't know the reason.

.

Its just to recognise each other in terms of tribal relationship, most Pashtoons belongs to one tribe, and each sub-tribe belongs to the ruler or tribal leader. For example, Hotaki's linage goes to Amir Mirwais Khan Hotaki Neeka, therefore, the founder of Hotaki tribe is Mirwais Khan Neeka and same goes with other tribes, It kind of makes sense and its important among Pashtoons. I come from Ahmadzai tribe, If I trace my lineage then I know who was the founder of my tribe. Now if anyone claims that he/she is from Ahmadzai tribe, It will be easier for me to trace his/hers lineage, whether that person really is Ahmadzai.

And there is more into it

SALLAHUDIN
01-07-2010, 11:46 AM
I think I had told Misz I would share these in another thread, well here ya go, enjoy:

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h241/wafysworld86/abdali.jpg
http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h241/wafysworld86/ghilzai.jpg

There was one more page but I can't seem to find it now, aah well.

Thanks for sharing sister, its master piece but they dont look in good condition, you gotta look after it:)

UmarUmar
01-07-2010, 01:51 PM
My dad can speak Pashto. I also knew Pashto because I lived in Peshawar as a refugee for 9 years. Now, that I have been here in Canada for like 10 years, I remember very little Pashto. I think Mohmands speak Northern Pashto but I am not sure. Durand Line has divided Mohmand territory in half..The areas of the Mohmand agency being in Pakistan while the rest in Afghanistan.

UmarUmar, I heard Ghilzai's are of Turkish descent. They came from Central Asia in the 10th century. IS that true because most Pashtuns are supposedly descended from Aryans and are Indo-European. I read in a book that both Yusufzais and Ghilzais are descended from Turks.

no man. Ghilzais are just the more nomadic of the pashtun tribes so they travel between india and central asia. They are indo iranians just like the majority of other afghans. These turkish and jewish theories are all false. Study it closely and you will see its all BS. Its also BS that all pashtuns had one ancestor Qais Abdur Rashid. Don't believe everything you read. I can give you link if you want to debunk that turkish and jewish descent theory.

Yousafzi are related to Durrani tribes and they are originally from Kandahar. They migrated to Peshawar from Kandahar. Peshawar used to be dominated by non pashtun poeple but pashtuns migrated there and subdued there lands. The same is true for Swat valley.

UmarUmar
01-07-2010, 01:57 PM
A question:

Why are there tribes among Pashtuns? I mean, at the beginning, probably each ethnic group lived in tribes, but later on, as they were urbanized, they left off their tribal distinctions. So why do Pashtuns take their tribal relationship very serious until now? I think calling oneself a Pahstun, is already enough, no need for making small tribal separations. They all have exactly the same culture and exactly the same language (though some very minor dialectal differences from region to region, but overall it is the same).

The question might sound a bit ridiculous, but it just came to my mind and i didn't know the reason.

.

There are tribes because majority of pashtuns still live in rural areas and their bonds are not yet broken. Tribal identity is similar to regional identity. You have many non pashtun afghans who identify themselves by the place where they live such as Herawi, mazari and badakhshi. Now a days tribal names are just surnames. The ties are becoming weaker and weaker and it will probably be eliminated in the next 100 years. As Haze pointed out. To non pashtuns we just say we are Afghan but amongst ourselves we talk about tribes when conversation develops further. Its like when you meet someone you say I am Afghan and if they want to know more you say your from Kabul.

wardakstar
01-08-2010, 02:43 AM
It is lovely when you join the elders and when they tell you stories of how the different tribes came to being and have so many jokes about the different tribes.. it is amazing.

I love the one about Zaazee baabaa and Wardak baabaa : D

Aab o Aatash
01-08-2010, 06:54 AM
A question:

Why are there tribes among Pashtuns? I mean, at the beginning, probably each ethnic group lived in tribes, but later on, as they were urbanized, they left off their tribal distinctions. So why do Pashtuns take their tribal relationship very serious until now? I think calling oneself a Pahstun, is already enough, no need for making small tribal separations. They all have exactly the same culture and exactly the same language (though some very minor dialectal differences from region to region, but overall it is the same).

The question might sound a bit ridiculous, but it just came to my mind and i didn't know the reason.

.

It's mostly for defensive purposes. Pashtoons were and still are mostly rural agriculturalists living on country that is scarce in arable land and water. Familial ties become very important in such an environment to ensure you get what you worked for. Clans would thus live in fortified villages in tribal districts, affording protection against marauders and opportunists.

The areas were tribal connections were most lax were around large urban centres such as Kabul and Jalalabad. It was these places that provided most of the detribalized autocrats of the central governments whom the tribes never really trusted. To them, the central government was mostly one clan asserting its authority over others.

Yes, Pashtoons share a culture and language but they are fiercely competitive with each other as a result of the environment they live in.

Fereshteh
02-25-2010, 11:09 PM
Hello. Do you have information on these tribes?
Mangal
Mullagori
Zaimukht

wardakstar
02-26-2010, 01:33 AM
mangal and zadran were the brothers of Wardak baba -)

i think.

Shams1
02-26-2010, 03:51 AM
na wardaki lala

Wardak Zazai and Tori are brothers ,Zadran and Mangal are same tribe,I'm not going to tell you why Wardak zazai and Tori fallen out with each other I'm sure you already know.:D:D:D

Thaumaturge
02-26-2010, 08:03 AM
It is quite possible that Ghalji (Ghilzais) are descended from a strain of Turks; but That doesn't mean they're not "Aryan" or of Indo-European Stock. Due to influences from Turkic movements many originally Indo-European Speakers adopted Turkic language and then again adopted Indo-European languages, The Bottomline is Pashtuns on the whole share cultural, linguistic and genetic affinities with Scythian Peoples, and the name Sakazai( tribe of Scythians) is still widely used amongst Pashtuns. Ghaljis were probably Turko-Scythic or of Ghorid origins.

Omarius
03-03-2010, 10:44 PM
half Noori/wardak, half Durrani. All farsi zuban.

dream boy
03-16-2010, 11:51 AM
salam alikum farhad brother i think you should start it from qais Abdur Rashid
Sarban
1Kasi or Kassi
2. Durrani
3. Tanoli
4. Tareen
5. Shirani
6. Yusufzai
7. Burki (Urmar)
8. Babore
9. Jaffar
10. Ustarana
11. Barech
Batan

1. Seyani
2. Dotanni
3. Niazi
4. Nasar
5. Swati
6. Shinwari
7. Suri
8. Lodi
9. Marwat
10. Baittani
11. Ghilzai
Ghourghusht

1. Kakar
2. Mando
3. Gadoon/Jadoon
4. Safi
5. Naghar
6. Pani
7. Daavi
8. Babai
Karlan

1. Afridi
2. Bangash
3. Dawari
4. Khattak
5. Khugyani
6. Mahsud
7. Orakzai
8. Wardak
9. Wazir
10. Zazi (Dzadzi)
11. Mangal

dream boy
03-16-2010, 11:52 AM
In Alphabetical Order

Achakzai

is a Pashtun subtribe of Barakzai Clan. there are various other subtribes within the Achakzai clan like ( Adozai,Shamshozai,sultanzai,matakzai,ishaqzai,aliz ai,shakarzai,hamidzai and ghabizai ) mainly settled in Pakistan. The village or hometown of the Achakzai's is Qilla Abdullah in Balochistanand in the pashtun dominated areas of Afghanistan mainly in Kandahar Urzgan and Helmand provinces. Various political figures aroused in the history of Achakzai tribe like Mula Abdullah khan who fought against the British Raj of India in the 19th centrury when they extended to the border of Afghanistan. Esmat Muslim was achakzai of The Adozai subclan and was a renowned militry leader of the Soviat backed regime in Aghanistan. The people of the region opposed the occupation. Major cities of The achakzai dwelling are Chaman along the border of Afghanistan in Pakistan and Spin Boldak on the side of Afghanistan. Gulistan and Toba Achakzai also abdullah Khan and Quetta. The Achakzai's have demanded a separate province for the Pashtun ethic group, a province that should include Quetta, Qilla Abdullah, Mianwali and Pastun parts of Balochistan, NWFP, FATA and named as Pashtunistan. Some famous Achakzai's are Mahmood Khan Achakzai (MNA & Chairman of Pakhtunkhwa Milli Awami Party), and his father was another respectable politician, Shaheed Abdul Samad Khan Achakzai. Historically Achakzais are brave intelligent and parioitic people. They have always fought for their land and have a good sense of discussion and critical thinking. Most of the achakzais are very good in negotiation and conflict resolution.In addition, achakzai's are famous for their ouitspokeness.




Afridi

Men from the Afridi tribe in battleAfridi (Urdu: آفریدی ) (Pashto: اپريدي ) is a Pashtun tribe. The Afridi tribe is the most powerful and dominant tribe of the Khyber Agency. The Afridis inhabat about 1000 miles of rough hilly area in the eastern Safed Koh range west of the Peshawarvalley. Maidan in Tirah which can be accessed by the Kajurhi plains and the valleys of Bara and Churah. The tribe numbers in about 315,000 people.

The famous historian Herodotus mentions a country bordering on the banks of the Indus occupied by a people called the Pactyae who were divided into four nations, one which was the Aparthea, or Aparutai, identified with the modern Afridis. They lay claim to an inaccessible upland area of refuge, the Tirah and it's central place, Maidan and at Bagh. As a result, they have literally have been able to force every passing conqueror to pay toll tax for use or passafe through the Khyber Pass. Some writers think that some tribes like the Afridis and Khattaks are indigenous, considering, for instance, that the afrids inhabited this terrain even during prehistoric times, which is before the recorded movement of other notable Pakhtun tribes to their present abodes. Olaf Caroe and Aurel Stein are reported to have suggested that the Afridis may be the original inhabitants of the Gandhare area rather than an integral part of the great clans allegedly descended from the tribes of Israel.

There are eight clans in the Afridi tribe. Adam Khel, Aka Khel, Kamar Khel, Kambar Khel, Kuki Khel, Malikdin Khel, Zakka Khel, and Sipah. All of the Afridi clans have their own areas in the Tirah, and most of them extend down into the Khyber over which they have always exercised the right of toll. The Malikdin Khel live in the center of the Tirah and hold Bagh, the traditional meeting place of Afridi jirgas or assemblies. The Aka Khel are scattered in the hills south of Jamrud. All of this area is included in the Khyber Agency. The Adam Khel live in the hills between Peshawar and Kohat. Their preserve is the Kohat Pass. In which several of the most important Afridi gun factories are located. The afridi Adam khel is further divided into seven clans as Jawakies, Bosti khel, Sherakies, Zarghoon Khel, Tor Chaaper, Akhorwal and Hassan Khel
Most Afridis have a meat eating cuisine eat kabob, lamb curry, chicken curry, goat curry, sheep, keema, Pata Teeka, and much more. Their vegetable cuisine consists of bendai(okra), choley, cuarka (red beans), dal, and more. Their desserts include keer (rice pudding), meenchai (sugared noodles). They drink a lot of chai.


Famous Afridis

Khatir Afridi , a prominent poet who wrote over 40,000 poems in his only four years of writing poetry. He died very young at the age of 32. He has only one son left who has collected all his poems and made a book out of them , a book which has achieved a good market value among the speakers of Pushto.
Shahid Afridi, famous in the world of cricket for his destructive batsmanship, once a pinch-hitter but now an all-rounder in the Pakistan ODI cricket team. Holds world record for fastest 100 (off only 37 balls).
Ayub Afridi, an associate of Abdul Qadir, described as a notorious drug baron.[1]
Ehsan Faraaz Afridi Khan, the notorious Ehsan Faraaz Afridi Khan is a cricketer from the province of Slough. His reputation precedes him wherever he goes. He was given the nickname "ACE" because of his formidable ability to get the wickets.

Dr Munawar Khan Afridi President & Chairman of WHO in the sixties




Ahmadzai
Ahmadzai is one of the largest tribes of Pashtuns.

Belonging to the Ghalzai or Ghaljai family of Pashtuns, the father of the tribe Ahmad Aba (father Ahmad) is buried in Paktika province in the southern part of Afghanistan.

Ahmadzai tribe originally sprung from the Junoobi province of the country, now divided in three provinces known as Paktya, Paktika and Khost. The tribe lives, apart from the three provinces, in Logar, Kabul, Maidan, Ghazni, Kapisa, Laghman, Nangarhar, Baghlan, Kunduz, Takhar and Balkh provinces.

A large part of the tribe lives in the south-eastern side of the Durnad line in Waziristan, Pakistan.

A number of Ahmadzai sub-tribes are Kuchi (nomads).

The former president of Afghanistan, Dr Mohammad Najibullah professor Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai are among the famous people of the tribe.


Alizai
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Alizai is a village in Pakistan located in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas near the Afghan border.

The United States has maintained detention facilities in Alizai, Pakistan. It is rumored that this site has been used to torture prisoners.[1][2]


Alizai

There are Three Places Named 'Alizai' In 'Kurram Agency' But the place we are talking about is Alizai Lower Kurram Agency. It is a Tehsil.It is occupied By Turi Tribe{Shia}.There are also Sunni Muslims in Alizai surroundings.It is the most Peaceful place in Kurram Agency.The people of Alizai are highly educated.It is near afghan border.This is the only place where every man can live a happy and peaceful life.




Barakzai

Barakzai or Barakzay is a Pashtun clan, belonging to Afghanistan and some also to Pakistan. The "Barakzai Dynasty" was the line of rulers in Afghanistan in the 19th and 20th centuries. Following the fall of the Durrani Empire in 1818, chaos reigned in the domains of Ahmed Shah Durrani's empire as various sons of Painda Khan struggled for supremacy. Afghanistan temporarely ceased to exist as a single nation, disintegrating for a brief time into a fragmented collection of small units. Dost Mohammad Khan gained preeminence in 1826 and founded the dynasty about 1837. Thereafter, his descendants ruled in direct succession until 1929, when King Amanullah Khan abdicated and his cousin Mohammed Nadir Shah was elected king. The most prominent subclan of the Barakzai Pashtun tribe is the Mohamedzai (Mohammadzai) clan, of which the several last kings had come from, including Mohammad Zahir Shah, the last king of Afghanistan.


List of Barakzai rulers

Emirate of Afghanistan

Emir Dost Mohammad Khan (1818-August 1839)
Emir Dost Mohammad Khan (1843-June 9, 1863)
Emir Shir Ali Khan (June 1863-February 21, 1879)
Emir Ya'qub Khan (February 1879-October 1879)
Emir Abdur Rahman Khan (October 1879/July 22, 1880-October 3, 1901)

Kingdom of Afghanistan

King Habibullah Khan (October 3, 1901 - February 20, 1919)
King Amanullah Khan (February 28, 1919 - January 14, 1929)
King Inayatullah Khan (January 14, 1929 - January 17, 1929)
King Mohammed Nadir Shah (October 17, 1929 - November 8, 1933)
King Mohammed Zahir Shah (November 8, 1933 - July 17, 1973)



Baburkhel

Baburkhel is a Pashtun tribe notably settled in the Nowshera District, Sarhad, Pakistan.

Babarkhel have settled in areas as far as at Zhob and there are small communities of Babarkhel, at Quetta, Multan and Dera Ismail Khan as well as in Muzaffargarh District.




Bangash

Bangash is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan. They are found mainly in the district and city of Kohat (also known as Kohistan) and in various surrounding towns such as Tirah, Obbatal, Darsamand, Hangu which is located in Kohat distric, Toghbala and Toraori in the Sarhad of Pakistan. Some Bangash are also settled in Khorasan and Mazandaran in Iran. Bangash are also found in India, especially in Farrukhabad. The Nawab of Farrukhabad was from the Bangash Tribe whose dynasty ruled until 1801 when power was transferred to the British. The Bangash speak the Pushtu dialect of Pashto.







Baranzai

Baranzai is a Pashtun tribe in the North West Frontier Province and Balochistan provinces of Pakistan.



Battanni

Battanni is the name of a small tribe who originally resided in the regions of Dera Ismail Khan district of North West Frontier Province of Pakistan.




Bazai

Bazai is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan.



Chamkanni

Chamkanni is the name of a small Pashtun tribe of Afghanistan. The Chamkannis residing in the western part of the Kurmana valley are considered to be a distinct race. During the Tirah Campaign (1897-98) of the British Raj, the bands of rebellious Chamkannis were also attacked.


Darpa Khel

Darpa Khel is a Pashtun tribe settled in Pakistan.



Daulat Khel

Daulat Khel, along with the Maghdud Khel, Mahmud Khel, Mahsud Khel, Khulozai, Umar Khel and Yusaf Khel, is a sub-division of the Kakazai, Tarkanis/Mamund tribe of the Pashtuns located in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Dilazak

TheDilazak 17:02, 3 January 2007 (UTC)==DILAZAK-AN AFGHAN TRIBE ==

It is an Afghan Tribe which descended into the valley of Peshawar (Pakistan) in Smanyid's dynasty from 'Suleman Range’ between 750 AD and 850 AD. They were the First of all Afghans and were Muslims by that time. They expelled or subdued local people of Swati, Degan and Tirahi castes. By the time of Mehmood Ghaznavi, they had reached up to Sind River (Also called Abaseen & Neelaab. They participated in Mehmood Ghaznavi's campaigns in large numbers under their leader Malik Yahya. Later they extended up to present day Hassan Abdal (Near Taxila) and towards north up to Abbott Abad. Around 1520 AD, another Afghan Tribe Yousafzi was expelled from Kabul (Afghanistan) by the uncle of Mughal Emperor Zaheeruddin Muhammad Babur, Mirza ulugh Beg. The Yousafzi's migrated to Peshawar valley and sought help from The Dilazak which was granted to them by The Dilazak. Later on relation between the two Tribes deteriorated and a long war ensued. Ultimately Yousafzi along with few other tribes (Including Utmanzi-Cousins of The Dilazak) were able to push away The Dilazak east of Sind River under their leader Malik Ahmed Khan after 20 Years. Tragedy of The Dilazak did not end here. The Mughals had fluctuating relations with the Afghans. To their hard luck, The Dilazak were on the eastern side of Sind River and thus totally accessible to a properly trained huge Mughal Army. Around 1607 AD, Mughal Emperor Jahangir (Muhammad Saleem) once visiting Kabul in Afghanistan, left His large Army under the command of Zaffar Khan Koka son of Zain Khan Koka and ordered him to wipe out The Dilazak and arrest the leaders of Khhattar Tribe (Non-Afghan).Zain Khan Koka did it well and deported 0.1 million (1,00,000) families of The Dilazak to Lahore for onward dispersal in whole of India. Only few families of The Dilazak survived from this tragic event. These families still survive. Today they are found in Districts Abbott Abad, Haripur, Charsadda, Swat, Peshawar (All in North West Frontier Province) and Attock (In Punjab Province). They are in districts Shahjehan Pur & also in village Shahjahanpur District(Meerut)on Meerut Garh Road(Uttar Perdesh), Jullandhar (Indian Punjab), Bari Town (Rajasthan) and Dilazi & other villages in Andhera Perdesh-old Deccan), Western Bengal and few other regions of India. References to this article are more than 100 English books and same no of Urdu/Pashto and Persian books. However, read 'The Pathans" by Sir Olaf Caroe, 'Baburnama' by Anitta S.Beverage, 'Taareekh-e-Khanjehani Wa Makhzan-e- Afghani' by Nematullah Hurvi etc. If you want to know anything more about this Karrani (Karlani) Tribe, Send an E mail to me at dilazak1@yahoo.com




Daulatzai

The Daulatzai are one of the Pashtun tribes of northern Afghanistan. They reside mainly in the province of Balkh, and also in parts of surrounding provinces.


Davi

Davi (also spelled as Dawee, Daavi or Daway) is a Pashtun tribe and the brother of the Kakar tribe. Both are the sons of Ghorghosht tribe. Ghorghosht was the third and youngest son of Qais Abdur-Rashid, the father of Pashtuns. Davis are traditionally known for their bravery, hardness and simplicity. They are said to be hospitable. They are living in Balochistan, especially in Quetta, Pishin, Zhob, Chaman and everywhere where Kakar lives. In Sarhad they are living in Katlang village and in sawaldhere village.


Durrani

Durrani (Persian: درانی) or Abdali (Persian: ابدالی) tribe is one of the two largest Pashtun tribes of Afghanistan and is also found in large numbers in western Pakistan. They are estimated to be roughly 20% of the population of Afghanistan and number around 7 million there with another 1-2 million found in Pakistan and hundreds of thousands also live in northeast Iran. The Durrani are the most "Persianized" of Pashtun tribes, often bilingual in Dari (or Afghan Persian), as well as arguably being among the most urbanized and educated of the Pashtuns in Afghanistan.

The Durrani have been prominent leaders, as the royal family of Afghanistan is derived from the tribe, and a substantial number of Durrani are bureaucrats and public officials, as well as businessmen and merchants. The particular dialect of Pashto favored by the Durrani tends to be tinged with a slight Persian inflection and is considered the more genteel and urbane dialect, often viewed by Pashtuns overall as the more 'proper' dialect, as opposed to the rougher "Pukhtu" version favored in the north and by most of the Pashtuns of Pakistan. The Durrani, like most other Pashtuns, are Muslim and are mostly of the Hanafi Sunni Islamic sect and, like most Pashtuns, continue to follow the Pashtun honor code known as Pashtunwali.


A brief history

The Durrani are, like other Pashtuns, primarily descendants of Aryan invaders of the Iranian variant (as well as the various invaders, such as the Greeks, and migrants who have passed through Afghanistan over the centuries) and probably arose in what is today southern Afghanistan near the Suleiman Mountains at some point between 2000 BCE to 1500 BCE. The Durrani were known as the Abdali since Islamic times and frequently lived under Persian rule in ancient times. They emerged near the city of Kandahar and were most likely Pagan, Buddhist and Zoroastrian in religion prior to the coming of Muslim Arabs who began the conversion of the local population to Islam. The Abdalis appear to have begun to spread out during the early Middle Ages along with other Pashtun tribes and came to inhabit most of what is today Afghanistan by 1000 CE at the latest. Often affiliated with the Persians of Iran, some rose to upper ranks of the Persian military during the reign of the Safavids and gained particular prominence under the rule of Nadir Shah. One of his prominent generals was a young Pashtun Abdali chieftain named Ahmad Shah Abdali who would later make himself the king of Afghanistan.

The name 'Durrani' or 'Durr-i-Durran' means the 'pearl of pearls' in Persian and was given to the Abdali tribe in 1747 when Ahmad Shah Abdali united the Pashtun tribes following a loya jirga and changed his own name to Ahmad Shah Durrani when he became the king of Afghanistan and founded the Durrani Empire. Since this period, the kings of Afghanistan have been of Durrani extraction. The Durrani were the most divided Pashtun tribe during the rule of the Ghilzai-dominated Taliban, with some having openly opposed them. The Durrani are the politically dominant Pashtun group in Afghanistan as the current President of Afghanistan is Hamid Karzai who is of the Durrani sub-group known as the Popalzay and has close ties to the former king of Afghanistan Zahir Shah, another member of the Durrani tribe.


Current social conditions

Like most Pashtun groups, the Durrani can be sub-divided into smaller clans and subtribes (such as the aforementioned Popalzai) which will still acknowledge each other as kinsmen. The literacy rate of the Durrani is the highest of all of the Pashtun tribes in Afghanistan and hovers around 25%. Perhaps the most liberal of the Pashtun groups, the Durrani are currently at the forefront of rebuilding war-torn Afghanistan and are quickly filling the ranks of the military and are valued as city officials and policemen in cities such as Kandahar and Kabul. The Durrani in Pakistan are largely refugees, but many have become prominent merchants in Quetta and Peshawar. The Durrani continue to live in close proximity to other Afghans and culturally overlap in many ways with the Tajiks with whom they often share more cultural and socio-economic traits in comparison to the more tribal Pashtuns such as the Ghilzai, who are the other major Pashtun group in Afghanistan. The Durrani are part of Sarbans, a Pashtun tribal group.



Edo-Khel

Edo-Khel is a Pashtun tribe whom inhabit the mountainous and vallied regions of south-eastern Afghanistan; mainly Wardak and Logar.




alam alikum farhad brother i think you should start it from qais Abdur Rashid
Sarban
1Kasi or Kassi
2. Durrani
3. Tanoli
4. Tareen
5. Shirani
6. Yusufzai
7. Burki (Urmar)
8. Babore
9. Jaffar
10. Ustarana
11. Barech
Batan

1. Seyani
2. Dotanni
3. Niazi
4. Nasar
5. Swati
6. Shinwari
7. Suri
8. Lodi
9. Marwat
10. Baittani
11. Ghilzai
Ghourghusht

1. Kakar
2. Mando
3. Gadoon/Jadoon
4. Safi
5. Naghar
6. Pani
7. Daavi
8. Babai
Karlan

1. Afridi
2. Bangash
3. Dawari
4. Khattak
5. Khugyani
6. Mahsud
7. Orakzai
8. Wardak
9. Wazir
10. Zazi (Dzadzi)
11. Mangal

dream boy
03-16-2010, 11:53 AM
alam alikum farhad brother i think you should start it from qais Abdur Rashid
Sarban
1Kasi or Kassi
2. Durrani
3. Tanoli
4. Tareen
5. Shirani
6. Yusufzai
7. Burki (Urmar)
8. Babore
9. Jaffar
10. Ustarana
11. Barech
Batan

1. Seyani
2. Dotanni
3. Niazi
4. Nasar
5. Swati
6. Shinwari
7. Suri
8. Lodi
9. Marwat
10. Baittani
11. Ghilzai
Ghourghusht

1. Kakar
2. Mando
3. Gadoon/Jadoon
4. Safi
5. Naghar
6. Pani
7. Daavi
8. Babai
Karlan

1. Afridi
2. Bangash
3. Dawari
4. Khattak
5. Khugyani
6. Mahsud
7. Orakzai
8. Wardak
9. Wazir
10. Zazi (Dzadzi)
11. Mangal

mass hysteria
03-21-2010, 12:51 AM
reppin niazi

Lailoma
04-08-2010, 08:35 PM
I am Durrani

Lailoma
04-08-2010, 08:37 PM
My dad can speak Pashto. I also knew Pashto because I lived in Peshawar as a refugee for 9 years. Now, that I have been here in Canada for like 10 years, I remember very little Pashto. I think Mohmands speak Northern Pashto but I am not sure. Durand Line has divided Mohmand territory in half..The areas of the Mohmand agency being in Pakistan while the rest in Afghanistan.

UmarUmar, I heard Ghilzai's are of Turkish descent. They came from Central Asia in the 10th century. IS that true because most Pashtuns are supposedly descended from Aryans and are Indo-European. I read in a book that both Yusufzais and Ghilzais are descended from Turks.


Yeah Mohmands speak Eastern Pashto.....since they are mostly in the East: Kunar, Nangarhar, etc

Whisper
04-14-2010, 01:36 PM
Great thread, really interesting...thanks!

RIZWAN TAREEN
11-28-2011, 10:25 PM
i,want to know about tor tareen tribes

RIZWAN TAREEN
11-28-2011, 10:28 PM
i have my family tree. i am tor tareen
any one have tor tareens family tree pls, contect me

borheezy
11-28-2011, 11:17 PM
omg is this the same rizwan?!

http://www.gifsforum.com/images/gif/omg/grand/aigle_omg_gif.gif

gordfdmox
11-29-2011, 02:28 AM
thank you very much for this great article about finding the right information. It was really helpfull to me.

dinosaur khan
12-02-2011, 10:06 PM
@Rizwan tareen
Tor tareen lives in balochistan. Both speen tareen and tor tareen are sections of main tareen family.
Some tareens live in hazara, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, the famous tareen of that region would be ayub khan, a dictator of pakistan. ayub khan even diclared himself chief of tareen tribe of balochistan.

saima11
01-30-2012, 04:59 PM
does anyone know about mian mithu sahib a khalil muttezai pathan who migrated to jullundher via peshawar and or delhi, was he an urmer?

subahtajnin
01-31-2012, 12:47 AM
thnx

HazaraPukhtunkhwa
07-09-2012, 05:43 PM
I have to do much more home work on Burki, but I believe they are related to Niazi Tribe of Mianwali and Attock Area..

Most Famous Niazi is Imran Khan the greatest Cricket Player in the World

Burki are not related to Niazis. The closest relative to Niazis are Lodis. In fact, Lodi was the umbrella under which Niazi branch existed. I use past tense because most Lodis and Niazis have lost the tribal structure and almost all live in the cities...of Punjab. I have an Uncle whose family is the remnant of the Lodi Dynasty of India and now they are all in Pakistan. Lodis mostly now speak only Urdu but Niazis now speak Hindko as their native tongue. Rarely you find a Niazi who speaks Pashto same as Jadoon or any other tribe for that matter who moved away too much from the Pashtun stronghold: Awan, Taherkhelis, Jadoon (Hazara not Sawabay), Tareen (in Hazara not Balochistan), Utmanzai (in Hazara-Tor Ghar), Shilmani, Swati all now speak Hindko. All are Pashtun though by lineage.

HazaraPukhtunkhwa
07-09-2012, 05:47 PM
I have to do much more home work on Burki, but I believe they are related to Niazi Tribe of Mianwali and Attock Area..

Most Famous Niazi is Imran Khan the greatest Cricket Player in the World

May be you think they are related because Imran Khan is half Niazai and half Burki. But Burki are not related to Niazis as such. The closest to Niazis are Lodis.