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Thread: Afghan women: poets and writers

  1. #1
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    Default Afghan women: poets and writers

    I only have poems by three female Afghan poets, Makhfi Badakhshi, Nadia Anjuman and Rabia Balkhi.

    I don't know any other female poets or writers.
    Do you know of any other female Afghan writers who wrote in Dari or Pashto?
    Can you share some of their works? prose or poetry?
    Maybe a brief bio?

    Thanks~
    Last edited by *Zohra*; 04-04-2010 at 02:45 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    There are many female poets and writers but unfortunately they are less popular. There are a couple of nice books with the biography of a large number of female poets and writers (more than a 100 names), which are "parda nesheenaan-e sukhan-goy" by Khanum Maagah Rahmani and "Zanaan-e Sukhanwar-e Afghanistan" by Halim Tanweer.

    I remember only a few other names who are relatively more famous than others: Zebunnissa Makhfi, Mahjouba Herawi, Gawhar Shaad Begum (spouse of Shahrukh Mirza of Timurids), Jahan Ara Begum, Noor Jahaan Begum, Mastoora, and not to forget Nazo Ana (mother of Mirwais Khan Hotaki and a great Pashto poet), and Parween E'etesami of Iran.

    .
    Last edited by Algazel; 04-04-2010 at 08:59 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Algazel View Post
    There are many female poets and writers but unfortunately they are less popular. There are a couple of nice books with the biography of a large number of female poets and writers (more than a 100 names), which are "parda nesheenaan-e sukhan-goy" by Khanum Maagah Rahmani and "Zanaan-e Sukhanwar-e Afghanistan" by Halim Tanweer.

    I remember only a few names who are relatively more famous than others: Zebunnissa Makhfi, Mahjouba Herawi, Gawhar Shaad Begum (spouse of Shahrukh Mirza of Timurids), Jahan Ara Begum, Noor Jahaan Begum, Mastoora (somewhere from modern Iran), and not to forget Nazo Ana (mother of Mirwais Khan Hotaki and a great Pashto poet), and Parween E'etesami of Iran.

    .
    Thank you Algazel!

    I am going to ask one of my relatives in Afghanistan to find me those books.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Zohra jaani have you heard of Bahar e sa'eed?

    Here is a link to her thread: http://www.afghanforums.com/showthread.php?t=17126

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    ناديه انجمن

    چامه سرای جوان که تنها 25 بهار زنده گي را پشت سر گذاشته بود و در سال چهارم دانشکده زبان و ادبيات دانشگاه هرات مصروف آموزش بود، و يک سال پيش با يکتن از کارکنان آن دانشکده ازدواج نموده بود،پنجم نوامبر سال روان عيسايي قرباني رفتار خشونت اميز و وحشيانه شوهرش گرديد و درگذشت .

    اولين مجموعه شعری او به نام " گل دودی" چندی پيش انتشار يافت که بيان روشن احساس پهناور اونسبت به زنده گي است وهمان ساني که نشر اين کتاب گفتمان گسترده را در محافل ادبي هرات برانگيخت،به همان پيمانه مورد توجه و دلبسته گي دوستداران چکامه های نفيس و دلنشين اش قرار گرفت .

    نيست شوقى كه زبان باز كنم، از چه بخوانم

    من كه منفور زمانم، چه بخوانم چه نخوانم

    چه بگويم سخن از شهد، كه زهر است به كامم

    واى از مشت ستمگر كه بكوبيده دهانم

    نيست غمخوار مرا در همه دنيا كه بنازم

    چه بگريم، چه بخندم، چه بميرم، چه بمانم

    من و اين كنج اسارت، غم ناكامى و حسرت

    كه عبث زاده*ام و مهر ببايد به دهانم

    دانم اى دل كه بهاران بود و موسم عشرت

    من پر بسته چه سازم كه پريدن نتوانم

    گرچه ديرى است خموشم، نرود نغمه زيادم

    زان كه هر لحظه به نجوا سخن از دل برهانم

    ياد آن روز گرامى كه قفس را بشكافم

    سر برون آرم از اين عزلت و مستانه بخوانم

    من نه آن بيد ضعيفم كه زهر باد بلرزم

    دخت افغانم و برجاست كه دايم به فغانم

    ****

    شب است و شعر می*زند شرر به لحظه*هاى من

    ز شوق شانه می*كشد به رشته صداى من

    چه آتشى است واعجب كه آب می*دهد مرا

    و عطر روح می*دمد به پيكر هواى من

    ندانم از كدام كوه، كدام كوه آرزو

    نسيم تازه می*وزد به فصل انتهاى من

    ز ابر نور می*رسد چنان زلال روشنى

    كه نيست حاجتى دگر به اشك*هاى*هاى من

    جرقه*هاى آه من ستاره ريز می*شود

    به عرش لانه می*كند كبوتر دعاى من

    سرشك بيخودانه ام به خط خط كتاب او

    نگاه كن چه بى بهانه می*چكد خداى من

    ز حرف حرف دفترى ز واژه واژه محشرى

    قيامتى رسيده از سكوت ديرپاى من

    مخر، مدر، حرير وهمى مرا كه خوشترم

    به شب كه شعر می*زند شرر به لحظه*هاى من

    Last edited by Anbarin; 04-04-2010 at 06:08 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    I forgot Mahestee Ganjawee (from Sultan Sanjar Saljoqi's court, and has a very tragical story) and Aisha Durani (from Temor Shah's period).

    You might be interested in these:

    A very interesting article by Ustad Jawed
    Az Raab'ea taa Parween
    Sher'e zanaan-e afghanistan

    .
    Last edited by Algazel; 04-04-2010 at 09:10 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Anbarin View Post
    Zohra jaani have you heard of Bahar e sa'eed?

    Here is a link to her thread: http://www.afghanforums.com/showthread.php?t=17126
    I haven't heard of her but I will add her name to my list. I will read the poems in that thread and look a the blog Shareef posted. Thanks.

    Thanks for the links.

    Quote Originally Posted by Algazel View Post
    I forgot Mahestee Ganjawee (from Sultan Sanjar Saljoqi's court, and has a very tragical story) and Aisha Durani (from Temor Shah's period).

    You might be interested in these:

    A very interesting article by Ustad Jawed
    Az Raab'ea taa Parween
    Sher'e zanaan-e afghanistan

    .
    Thank you Algazel for giving me some great resources online and several names to research.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    ^ You're welcome.

    If you search for each individual name in google, you will find all their biography and some poetry.

    Check this for Mahestee Ganjawee:
    http://www.rawzana.com/Maeste%20-ganjawie.htm

    Check this for Gawhar Shaad Begum:
    http://turkistanjenubi.wordpress.com...-%DA%A9%DB%8C/

    Said Makhdoom Raheen, the newly appointed Minister of Culture who was also in that post in the transitional government, was very interested by Gawhar Shaad Begum. He encouraged the authors of Academy of Sciences to research on her, and held several conferences about her life and works. But non of the research papers or conferences' results are available on the net.

    .
    Last edited by Algazel; 04-07-2010 at 12:27 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Mujib View Post
    Women poets?
    Yeah, Kinda like Men chefs.
    Inspirational Msg# 2: Toghether we can all make Omarius feel Love

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Mujib View Post
    Women poets?
    I was a bit concerned at first as well
    but I reflected further and realised that theres only like 1 in 3,000 female poets.

    I think the reason (now dont kill me anyone) is because they lack the ability to express their emotions in a structured format such as a poem. You wonder why Rumi has about 300,000 beits, and Rabia Balkhi has 35 beits?

    Because Rumi would sit and say "okay I need to express my love right now.. it will end in "hech mago".. qamar hech mago, shakar hech mago, safar hech mago, degar hech mago... and ramal meter... fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun..."

    Rabia Balkhi by contrast would say "I need to express my love right now...... I need to go shout at Baktash"

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Shareef View Post
    I was a bit concerned at first as well
    but I reflected further and realised that theres only like 1 in 3,000 female poets.

    I think the reason (now dont kill me anyone) is because they lack the ability to express their emotions in a structured format such as a poem. You wonder why Rumi has about 300,000 beits, and Rabia Balkhi has 35 beits?

    Because Rumi would sit and say "okay I need to express my love right now.. it will end in "hech mago".. qamar hech mago, shakar hech mago, safar hech mago, degar hech mago... and ramal meter... fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun, fa'ilatun..."

    Rabia Balkhi by contrast would say "I need to express my love right now...... I need to go shout at Baktash"
    I beg your pardon!?

    Maybe it had something to do with freedom of expression granted to one gender and not the other? :-P Or, or, perhaps majority of female poets' works were never published? OR, since many of the classical male poets were also 'praise parrots' of some King or Shah, they were able to receive recognition and accolades but the females were kept in the backdrop?

    I dont know man, but that aint right. Lil Kim expresses herself equally as good, if not better, as Mystikal.
    ...murmle...

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Shareef View Post
    I was a bit concerned at first as well
    but I reflected further and realised that theres only like 1 in 3,000 female poets.

    I think the reason (now dont kill me anyone) is because they lack the ability to express their emotions in a structured format such as a poem. You wonder why Rumi has about 300,000 beits, and Rabia Balkhi has 35 beits?
    I don't agree with that. Rabia Balkhi might have had as much Ghazal and poetry as like any other famous male poet, but when her brother killed her, he also destroyed her whole Diwan. Right now a few pieces of her poetry have survived, but it doesn't mean that she had only 10 or 11 ghazals.

    Yes, the number of female poets have been very small compared to male poets, but still there is a good number of female poets. Most of them with a very good level of poetry. Zebunnissa Makhfi, Makhfi Badakhshi, Mahjooba Herawi and Mahestee Ganjawee's poetry are all very beautiful.

    Btw, what Rumi said is way incomparable to what Rabia Said. Rabia only said that she loved Baktash, while Rumi said: "az tu ba haq raseedam, ay haq-e haqguzaar-e man; Faash megoyam iin sukhan, Shams-e Man o Khudaay-e man"

    Hopefully, Turkish people weren't very strict in Islam and there weren't any strict Mullah's in Qunya, if not, they would have hung him just as they did Mansur Hallaaj.

    .

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Algazel View Post
    Hopefully, Turkish people weren't very strict in Islam and there weren't any strict Mullah's in Qunya, if not, they would have hung him just as they did Mansur Hallaaj.
    The people of Mawlana Rumi's (ra) watan were certainly strict Muslims. His tariqa grew amongst them before spreading to other parts. And his father, his teachers, and he himself were all strict mullahs. Mawlana Shams (ra) and Mawlana Rumi (ra) both condemned pseudo-sufis who in the name of Sufism contravened the Shari`a.

    Mansur al-Hallaj's (ra) was another case altogether.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Calm_Paroxysm View Post
    I beg your pardon!?

    Maybe it had something to do with freedom of expression granted to one gender and not the other? :-P Or, or, perhaps majority of female poets' works were never published? OR, since many of the classical male poets were also 'praise parrots' of some King or Shah, they were able to receive recognition and accolades but the females were kept in the backdrop?

    I dont know man, but that aint right. Lil Kim expresses herself equally as good, if not better, as Mystikal.
    I hear ya man, I agree with you too.

    I just said what I said to annoy FatimaJaan who was online at the time, and expected to get some humorous reaction from her. But I think she read my post, went "meh", then continued to browse the "Post Your Eyes" thread.

    Not that I was seeing whose online, or anything.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Algazel View Post
    I don't agree with that. Rabia Balkhi might have had as much Ghazal and poetry as like any other famous male poet, but when her brother killed her, he also destroyed her whole Diwan. Right now a few pieces of her poetry have survived, but it doesn't mean that she had only 10 or 11 ghazals.

    Yes, the number of female poets have been very small compared to male poets, but still there is a good number of female poets. Most of them with a very good level of poetry. Zebunnissa Makhfi, Makhfi Badakhshi, Mahjooba Herawi and Mahestee Ganjawee's poetry are all very beautiful.

    Btw, what Rumi said is way incomparable to what Rabia Said. Rabia only said that she loved Baktash, while Rumi said: "az tu ba haq raseedam, ay haq-e haqguzaar-e man; Faash megoyam iin sukhan, Shams-e Man o Khudaay-e man"

    Hopefully, Turkish people weren't very strict in Islam and there weren't any strict Mullah's in Qunya, if not, they would have hung him just as they did Mansur Hallaaj.

    .
    Do you know what the major sources are for the life of Rabiah Balkhi?

    I have a copy of Attar's "Ilahinama", and I guess that contains the longest description of her. But are their any accounts of her in other memoirs of poets, history books, etc., which shed a bit more light on her as an historical personality?

    I visited her ziyarat in Balkh, which was actually erected in the 20th century by the Ministry of Culture. It struck me how much we have invested in her as an historic personality, yet contain such scanty information about who she was, where she lived, or anything more about her.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Shareef View Post
    I just said what I said to annoy FatimaJaan who was online at the time, and expected to get some humorous reaction from her. But I think she read my post, went "meh", then continued to browse the "Post Your Eyes" thread.
    Edit: I did get a humorous reaction from her.. Soulja boy tell em!!!

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Mujib View Post
    The people of Mawlana Rumi's (ra) watan were certainly strict Muslims. His tariqa grew amongst them before spreading to other parts. And his father, his teachers, and he himself were all strict mullahs. Mawlana Shams (ra) and Mawlana Rumi (ra) both condemned pseudo-sufis who in the name of Sufism contravened the Shari`a.

    Mansur al-Hallaj's (ra) was another case altogether.
    Hadhrat Mawlana experienced his spiritual revolution only after meeting Shams-e Tabrezi (qad). Before that, he was like any other Islamic scholars. Perhaps the only difference between him and some other scholars was that he believed in Tasawwuf because he had met Shaykh Attar Naishapuri (rah) on their way from Balkh to Qunya, but he was only 12 at that time.

    And it is necessary to emphasize that Mawlana could not and did not follow the Sharee'ah as he should have. Check his Diwan-e Shams, you will find unlimited number of verses which are in contradiction with the outward Sharee'ah. Just consider the verse which I quoted earlier where he considers Shams as his God. That's not a metaphor, so that you can interpret the word "God" as something else, but he really meant it.

    Even Shams's practices are known to have not been exactly consistent with the Sharee'ah. In "Khate Sewwom" it has been reported that once Shams was in Samaa' (dancing). At the moment, the Mu'azzen called for prayer and they all heard it. Shams did not stop dancing. Then one of his mureeds stopped him and said: Ya Shaykh it's time for prayer. Then he said: berawed shumaa namaaz koned, maa raa parwaaye namaaz nest.

    And personally I believe that Mawlana's practices cannot be considered a Tariqah. He was a lover of God, and he was bestowed Ma'refah through Shams (qadassallahu sarahul aziz), and the "partaw-e tajalliyaat" was so excessive that he could not tolerate to keep himself within the boundaries of Sharee'ah.

    But yeah, Shams was a Murshid and had mureeds.

    Edit: Yeah, actually I had forgotten that his father was into Tasawwuf and linked to Ahmad Ghazali (Rah), but we don't have any record that Mawlana Jalaluddin himself practiced very deeply his father's tareeqah until meeting Shams Tabrezi.
    Last edited by Algazel; 04-08-2010 at 05:53 AM.

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    Default Re: Afghan women: poets and writers

    Quote Originally Posted by Shareef View Post
    Do you know what the major sources are for the life of Rabiah Balkhi?

    I have a copy of Attar's "Ilahinama", and I guess that contains the longest description of her. But are their any accounts of her in other memoirs of poets, history books, etc., which shed a bit more light on her as an historical personality?

    I visited her ziyarat in Balkh, which was actually erected in the 20th century by the Ministry of Culture. It struck me how much we have invested in her as an historic personality, yet contain such scanty information about who she was, where she lived, or anything more about her.
    Shaykh Attar (rah)'s description about Rabiya is the most detailed. As he considered her to be a Wali'ullah, and her love was actually "Eshq-e Haqiqi" but channeled through Baktash.

    I think Mawlana Jami (rah) has also given some accounts of her life in his Nafahaat-ul-Uns, but I am not sure, I have not read it myself.

    There are only a few of her Ghazals available, and one of our contemporary scholars, Gulam Habib Nawabi (who has passed away) has done an extensive research on her, but still it is insufficient because all of her poetry were destroyed. And I think it was him who encouraged the Ministry of Culture of that time to re-build her tomb.

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